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R Scripts for computing adult and maternal mortality from DHS sibling survival histories. (...) Death by survey: Estimating adult mortality without selection bias from sibling survival data. (...) Masquelier, B. (2013). Adult mortality from sibling survival data: A reappraisal of selection biases.
Language:English
Score: 1856962.9 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...ons/pdf/technical/TP2019-2.pdf
Data Source: un
Siblings’ exposures were excluded from the adult and maternal mortality estimation where the DHS has been unable to impute a current age. (...) Death by survey: estimating adult mortality without selection bias from sibling survival data. (...) "Divergences in trends in child and adult mortality in sub-Saharan Africa: Survey evidence on the survival of children and siblings."
Language:English
Score: 1801580 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...ons/pdf/technical/TP2014-3.pdf
Data Source: un
Adult mortality analysis in sub-Saharan Africa relied heavily on surveys that collected retrospective data on the survival of parents or siblings. (...) Death by survey: Estimating adult mortality without selection bias from sibling survival data. (...) Participants remarked that estimates of adult mortality based on sibling histories generally seemed to be low compared to historical experience.
Language:English
Score: 1736335.7 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...5/EGM_AdultMort2008_Report.pdf
Data Source: un
It describes the basic child and adult mortality indicators that can be derived from these surveys and the different approaches possible to calculate estimates of these indicators. (...) While not strictly a rate, the arithmetic difference is used by convention for simplicity because in practice there is almost no difference between a rate calculated as the probability of dying between age 1 month and age 1 year and the arithmetic difference between the infant mortality rate and the neonatal mortality rate. Adult mortality indicators:  Adult mortality to age 60 (45q15): the probability of dying between exact ages 15 and 60 years;  Adult mortality to age 50 (35q15): the probability of dying between exact ages 15 and 50 years. The age of 15 years is generally used as the starting point for adult mortality estimates as it is roughly the age at which declining childhood mortality risks transition to increasing adult mortality risks (Hill, 2003).
Language:English
Score: 1710179 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...011-2_MortEstMajorSampSurv.pdf
Data Source: un
He suggests a two-stage process, by which the GB method is applied first to estimate any change in census coverage, and the SEG method is then applied to data after adjusting the census numbers for possible coverage change. Sibling Survival Analogous to the use of a birth history to measure infant and child mortality is the use of a sibling history (essentially the birth history of the respondent’s mother) to measure adult mortality. (...) Comparisons with other sources suggest that sibling survival tends to underestimate adult mortality (Stanton et al., 1997). (...) There can be no doubt, however, that the epidemic has had dramatic effects on adult mortality in certain populations. Timæus (2003) has used regression models with data on survival of siblings from Demographic and Health Surveys to document very large increases in adult mortality in a number of African populations.
Language:English
Score: 1681758.6 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...s/pdf/expert/5/HILL_Paper1.pdf
Data Source: un
She also mends and makes clothes for children and adults for a price, and has ventured into the side business of knitting ‘hulla’, a traditional cap worn by men and boys in northern Nigeria. (...) “Since our mother is not here, I am now responsible for my siblings, including ensuring they remain in school and complete their education,” she said. Related topics Life skills Nigeria More to explore Article From despair to hope and aspiration Previously lacking education, skills and economic power, young adults in Borno are now finding a renewed drive to succeed Read the story Article Young people advocate that leaders reimagine youth skills Young people in Nigeria are calling the government to set up structures to reduce the socio-economic impact of the pandemic on young people Read the story Footer Home What we do Research and reports Stories Press centre Take action About Us Situation of women and children Where we work Job Vacancies Tiny stories Related UNICEF Websites UNICEF in West & Central Africa U-Report Nigeria UNICEF Connect Generation Unlimited Voices of Youth Clean Nigeria Every Child in School Become a donor Social Footer Secondary Contact Us Legal Footer tertiary Report fraud, abuse, wrongdoing
Language:English
Score: 1623590.4 - https://www.unicef.org/nigeria...upporting-big-sister-big-heart
Data Source: un
Entire age range of childhood (0-17) Advantages: Understand full burden on children See inter-relationships among exposures Identify highest risk children Appreciate developmental patterns Promote collaboration, avoid fragmented response JVQ Logo JVQ Modules Module A: Conventional Crime – Robbery – Personal Theft – Vandalism – Assault with Weapon – Assault without Weapon – Attempted Assault – Kidnapping – Bias Attack Module B: Child Maltreatment – Physical Abuse by Caregiver – Psychological/Emotional Abuse – Neglect – Custodial Interference/Family Abduction Module C: Peer & Sibling Victimization – Gang or Group Assault – Peer or Sibling Assault – Nonsexual Genital Assault – Bullying – Emotional bullying – Dating Violence Module D: Sexual Victimization – Sexual Assault by Known Adult – Nonspecific Sexual Assault – Sexual Assault by Peer – Rape: Attempted or Completed – Flashing/Sexual Exposure – Verbal Sexual Harassment – Statutory Rape & Sexual Misconduct Module E: Witnessing & Indirect Victimization – Witness to Domestic Violence – Witness to Parent Assault of Sibling – Witness to Assault with Weapon – Witness to Assault without Weapon – Burglary of Family Household – Murder of Family Member or Friend – Witness to Murder – Exposure to Random Shootings, Terrorism or Riots – Exposure to War or Ethnic Conflict JVQ Modules NatSCEV JVQ Additions Community Crime Exposure – Family/friend Sexual Assault – Family/ friend Robbed – Family/friend Gun Threat Family Abuse Exposure – Parents Threaten Other Parent – Parents Break Objects – Parents Push Other Parent – Parents Slap, Choke, Beat Up – Any Teen or Grown-up Fight in Household School Violence Threat – Threaten School Bomb or Attack – School Vandalism Internet Victimization – Internet Harassment – Internet Sexual Victimizations JVQ Modules Major Victimization Types by Victim Age Physical Assault Witness Violence Property Victimization Maltreatment Sexual Victimization Any Victimization Indirect Exposure to Violence 3-year running average Victimization in Last Year Total and Selected Aggregates (Children 0-17, N=4549) 61 46 6 10 25 25 Physical Assaults, Bullying and Teasing in the Past Year 46% of the sample reported a physical assault 10% reported an assault-related injury 13% reported bullying and 20% reported being teased and harassed Boys have higher rates of most assault and bullying victimizations Physical assaults with no injury and bullying highest among elementary school age children (6-9) Other assault categories and dating violence highest among teenagers Assault perpetrators most often juvenile acquaintances and siblings Sexual Victimizations in the Past Year 8% of the 14-17 y o girls reported a sexual assault; 3% of boys Sexual victimizations highest among female teenagers Adult perpetrators responsible for 15% of total sexual victimizations and 29% of sexual assaults Most sexual victimizations perpetrated by acquaintances Child Maltreatment in the Past Year 10% of sample reported some form of child maltreatment; 17% of 14-17 y o Emotional abuse most common Physical abuse 8% 14-17 y o. 20% life time Rates similar for boys and girls (except sexual abuse) Rates lowest for pre-school age children Property Victimizations in the Past Year 25% of the sample reported property victimizations 5% experienced robbery, 7% theft, and 6% vandalism by non-siblings Boys have higher rates of property victimizations Most often perpetrated by juvenile acquaintances Odds Ratios for Occurrence of Other Victimization Type Given One Victimization Type PAST YEAR VICTIMIZATION Any Physical Assault Any Sexual Victimizat ion Any Maltreatm ent Any Property Victimizati on Any Witness Violence Exposur e to Violence Any Physical Assault 5.0 4.1 2.7 2.5 2.2 Any Sex Victimization 1.8 2.9 2.2 2.2 3.2 Any Maltreatment 1.8 3.3 2.1 2.4 2.7 Any Property Victimization 1.8 3.5 2.9 2.4 2.9 Any Witness Violence 1.7 3.1 3.3 2.4 3.2 Any Indirect Exp to Viol 1.4 3.5 2.6 2.1 2.3 • Of those with 1 type of direct victimization, 64.5% had 2 or more types of victimization • 10.9% ≥ 5 types of victimization (PY), 1.4%≥ 10 types (PY) Key contributions • New estimates not previously available, in particular of the full spectrum of child victimization • Estimates over full span of childhood • How many kids suffer from a single and multiple types of exposures • Increased risk created by any exposure • Implications: Need to ask about the full spectrum of victimization experiences (dating violence, emotional maltreatement, property victimization, exposure to violence in family and community) Need a more integrated approach among policy makers, programme designers, and practitioners that addresses the full spectrum For more information contact: David Finkelhor david.finkelhor@unh.edu http://www.unh.edu/ccrc mailto:david.finkelhor@unh.edu http://www.unh.edu/ccrc
Language:English
Score: 1578710.4 - https://violenceagainstchildre...ildren_exposed_to_violence.pdf
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Article From despair to hope and aspiration Previously lacking education, skills and economic power, young adults in Borno are now finding a renewed drive to succeed Fatima Shehu - Monitoring and Reporting Officer, UNICEF Maiduguri UNICEF/2021/Shehu 28 September 2021 Despite being affected by protracted conflict from a young age, 20-year-olds Amina Usman and Mohammed Aji Goni are now taking charge of their lives using vocational skills provided by the Borno State Agency for Mass Education (BOSAME), in collaboration with UNICEF. (...) For the Eid holiday, I gave my parents and siblings 6,000 naira each for food and new clothes. (...) Today, the once bleak future of these young adults has taken a turn for the better. Mohammed now pays his schools fees with ease and is currently enrolled in Primary 5.
Language:English
Score: 1578710.4 - https://www.unicef.org/nigeria...es/despair-hope-and-aspiration
Data Source: un
R Scripts for computing adult and maternal mortality from DHS sibling survival histories. (...) Death by survey: Estimating adult mortality without selection bias from sibling survival data. (...) Masquelier, B. (2013). Adult mortality from sibling survival data: A reappraisal of selection biases.
Language:English
Score: 1571989.3 - https://www.un.org/development...020/Jan/un_2019_techpaper2.pdf
Data Source: un
Methods for Estimating Adult Mortality | United Nations Population Division | Department of Economic and Social Affairs Skip to main navigation Skip to content Welcome to the United Nations. (...) UN Search Development Department of Economic and Social Affairs Population Search HOME COMMISSION THEMES DOCUMENTS EVENTS PUBLICATIONS ABOUT US Publications Current Publications Databases Datasets Data Booklet Manuals Population Facts Newsletter Expert Paper Series Technical Paper Series Maps Archive Methods for Estimating Adult Mortality Download Now This manual brings together existing methods for adult mortality estimation in situations where reliable and complete data registration systems are not available. The methods covered include census survival methods, growth balance methods, the extinct generations method, estimates from data on survival of parents, and estimates from data on survival of siblings. Copyright | Terms of Use | Privacy Notice | Contact | Fraud Alert | Help
Language:English
Score: 1559010.4 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...rtality/estimate-mortality.asp
Data Source: un