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“Conventional therapy” has not been formally explained/defined in any of the state documents or regulatory acts. 3. (...) What kind of information and data are collected by States to understand the nature and extent of so-called “conversion therapies”? 5. Has there been an identification of risks associated with practices of so-called “conversion therapy”? (...) Have any State institutions taken a position in relation to practices of so-called “conversion therapy”? There have been no cases of “conversion therapy” in the country yet.
Language:English
Score: 1096364.7 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...rnment_of_Georgian_IE_SOGI.pdf
Data Source: un
IE SOGI - eReport_V1_20200529 United Nations Independent Expert on protection against violence and discrimination based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity - IESOGI REPORT ON CONVERSION THERAPY WHAT IS CONVERSION THERAPY? “Conversion therapy” is used as an umbrella term to describe interventions of a wide-ranging nature, all of which have in common the belief that a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity (SOGI) can and should be changed. (...) Conversion therapy currently happens in a multitude of countries, in all regions of the world. (...) WHAT ARE THE CONSEQUENCES OF “CONVERSION THERAPY” PRACTICES? The methods and means commonly utilized to implement practices of “conversion therapy” lead to psychological and physical pain and suffering.
Language:English
Score: 1095459.4 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...on/ConversionTherapyReport.pdf
Data Source: un
IE SOGI - eReport_V1_20200529 United Nations Independent Expert on protection against violence and discrimination based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity - IESOGI REPORT ON CONVERSION THERAPY WHAT IS CONVERSION THERAPY? “Conversion therapy” is used as an umbrella term to describe interventions of a wide-ranging nature, all of which have in common the belief that a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity (SOGI) can and should be changed. (...) Conversion therapy currently happens in a multitude of countries, in all regions of the world. (...) WHAT ARE THE CONSEQUENCES OF “CONVERSION THERAPY” PRACTICES? The methods and means commonly utilized to implement practices of “conversion therapy” lead to psychological and physical pain and suffering.
Language:English
Score: 1095459.4 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...es/ConversionTherapyReport.pdf
Data Source: un
Botswana was one of the first countries in Africa to establish a national antiretroviral therapy programme. The implementation of antiretroviral therapy started in 2002 and expanded to 23 sites in 2004. (...) Botswana began providing antiretroviral therapy in 2002 in Gabarone. By the end of 2004, 23 sites were providing antiretroviral therapy. (...) Resource requirements and funds committed for scaling up antiretroviral therapy in 2004-2005 7. WHO support for scaling up antiretroviral therapy 6.
Language:English
Score: 1094850 - https://www.who.int/3by5/support/june2005_bwa.pdf
Data Source: un
A national antiretroviral therapy protocol has been developed and revised in accordance with WHO simplified treatment guidelines. (...) Health services need to be strengthened to provide a more vigorous response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic and to support scaling up antiretroviral therapy. The major constraints to scaling up antiretroviral therapy are the lack of human resources capacity and management skills. (...) The national antiretroviral therapy target set by the government for the end of 2005 has since been revised.
Language:English
Score: 1093318.4 - https://www.who.int/3by5/support/june2005_dji.pdf
Data Source: un
Training various categories of health workers is critical for scaling up antiretroviral therapy. Laboratory capacity to diagnose and monitor the people receiving antiretroviral therapy needs to be strengthened. (...) Resource requirements and funds committed for scaling up antiretroviral therapy in 2004-2005 7. WHO support for scaling up antiretroviral therapy 6. (...) During 2003, an estimated 1000 people received antiretroviral therapy. Most of the treatment of people living with HIV/AIDS occurs through the private sector, which has made antiretroviral therapy available since 2001 for those who can afford it.
Language:English
Score: 1093084.3 - https://www.who.int/3by5/support/june2005_lso.pdf
Data Source: un
EMERGENCY SCALE-UP OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY IN RESOURCE-LIMITED SETTINGS:10 People living with HIV/AIDS and communities as leaders in antiretroviral therapy Recommendation 4. (...) EMERGENCY SCALE-UP OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY IN RESOURCE-LIMITED SETTINGS:14 The essential package of care and prevention services necessary to support antiretroviral therapy 3. (...) EMERGENCY SCALE-UP OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY IN RESOURCE-LIMITED SETTINGS:16 The essential package of care and prevention services necessary to support antiretroviral therapy 5.
Language:English
Score: 1092950.1 - https://www.who.int/3by5/publi...ions/documents/en/zambiaen.pdf
Data Source: un
Scaling up antiretroviral therapy in Zambia requires guaranteeing continued funding for drugs and supplies. (...) Resource requirements and funds committed for scaling up antiretroviral therapy in 2004-2005 7. WHO support for scaling up antiretroviral therapy 6. (...) By the end of 2009, it is proposed that all hospitals and health centres in Zambia will be providing antiretroviral therapy. • As of September 2004, an estimated 13 636 people were accessing antiretroviral therapy in Zambia; 13 555 people were receiving antiretroviral therapy through the public sector and an additional 81 people were receiving antiretroviral therapy at a designated MTCT-Plus site.
Language:English
Score: 1092588.3 - https://www.who.int/3by5/support/june2005_zmb.pdf
Data Source: un
Questions 1 to 8e will be answered together. 1. Conversion therapies in Germany In Germany, so-called “conversion therapies” are still being offered and conducted. (...) The Federal Government is planning a law to protect persons against such therapies. Federal Ministry of Health is in the process of drafting a separate law to protect persons against such therapies. (...) On these grounds, we consider so-called “conversion therapy” a human rights violation. Organizations and institutions that practice “conversion therapy” and other human rights violations cannot be partners of German development cooperation.
Language:English
Score: 1091606.3 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...ht_f%C3%BCr_IE_SOGI_final.docx
Data Source: un
Patient, Lascahobas Clinic, Haiti. Top: Before therapy for TB and AIDS, February/March 2003. Right: After therapy for TB and AIDS, September 2003. (...) The target By the end of 2005, 3 million eligible people in developing countries who need antiretroviral therapy will be receiving effective antiretroviral therapy. (...) Lifelong provision of therapy must be guaranteed to everyone who has started antiretroviral therapy.
Language:English
Score: 1090827.9 - https://www.who.int/3by5/publi...3by5StrategyMakingItHappen.pdf
Data Source: un