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All CBDs receive a five-day training course on iCCM. (...) In addition to key iCCM management staff, other staff interviewed included the IRC’s Primary Health, Nutrition, and Child Protection Managers. Separate interview guides were developed for each type of informant, with focus on the following topics:  Program successes, issues, and challenges in terms of policy, advocacy, funding, ownership, and sustainability and strategies for effective programming during crises (for policymakers);  Key technical areas of the program, including training and overall resource management, supervision and service delivery, referral system, supply chain, communication, and social mobilization, M&E, and information systems (for program implementers);  Supports provided to CBDs and how these supports were affected by the conflict (for health workers). (...) The focus group guides were developed for each type of informant and focused on the following topics:  Past and current situation of the iCCM program in the field  Their opinions on their role in supporting and/or utilizing iCCM services  For CBD Supervisors: Factors contributing to success and difficulties, as well as consideration about the functionality of the current program and suggestions for the future  For community leaders: Perspectives on the context and impact of iCCM programming and conflict within the overall community, including any community-level decision-making processes that were enacted during the conflict  For CBDs: Their successes and difficulties and their assessments of whether they are able to effectively carry out their work  For caregivers: Opinion of the CBD’s work, care seeking behaviors, access to care, their experience during the emergency, and how the program could be improved to better meet their needs Sample size The original research plan allowed for a maximum number of KIIs and FGDs based on available resources: 11 Group Methods Sample size Research topics Policy makers Semi- structured IDI 8-10 IDIs (6 NGO partners + 2-4 MoH and donor/agency representatives) 1.
Language:English
Score: 1404801.7 - https://www.unicef.org/media/61571/file
Data Source: un
It adds that the TRIPS Council’s work on these topics is to be guided by the TRIPS Agreement’s objectives (Article 7) and principles (Article 8), and must take development issues fully into account. > Back to TRIPS issues back to top TRIPS news  News about the TRIPS Council and intellectual property in the WTO, prepared for non-specialists. back to top Briefing  Background and the current situation on Article 27.3(b), traditional knowledge and biodiversity back to top Secretariat documents  Summaries of issues raised and points made: The TRIPS Agreement and Convention on Biological Diversity. (...) Document no Communication from Title Date TN/C/W/61 (also circulated as WT/GC/W/633) Director-General Report on Issues Related to the Extension of the Protection of Geographical Indications Provided for in Article 23 of the TRIPS Agreement to Products other than Wines and Spirits and those Related to the Relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the Convention on Biological Diversity 21 April 2011 TN/C/W/59 Brazil, China, Colombia, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Peru, Thailand, the ACP Group, and the African Group Draft decision to enhance mutual supportiveness between the TRIPS Agreement and the Convention on Biological Diversity 19 April 2011 TN/C/W/52 TN/C/W/52/Add.1 TN/C/W/52/Add.2 and TN/C/W/52/Add.3 Albania, Brazil, China, Colombia, Ecuador, the European Communities, Iceland, India, Indonesia, the Kyrgyz Republic, Liechtenstein, the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Pakistan, Peru, Sri Lanka, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey, the ACP Group and the African Group + Croatia + Georgia + Moldova Draft Modalities for TRIPS Related Issues 19 July 2008, 24 July 2008, 25 July 2008, 29 July 2008 TN/C/W/50 (also circulated as WT/GC/W/591 ) Director-General Report on Issues Related to the Extension of the Protection of Geographical Indications Provided for in Article 23 of the TRIPS Agreement to Products other than Wines and Spirits and those Related to the Relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the Convention on Biological Diversity   TN/C/W/49 , TN/C/W/49/Add.1 and TN/C/W/49/Add.2 (also circulated as WT/GC/W/590 + Add.1 and Add.2 ) Brazil, China, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, Paraguay, Peru, South Africa, Tanzania, Thailand, Venezuela, least-developed countries (LDC) Group and African-Caribbean-Pacific (ACP) Group + African Group + Sri Lanka Appropriate action to be taken/decided by the General Council on TRIPS & CBD 28 May 2008, 13 June 2008 and 10 July 2008 IP/C/W/504 Japan The Patent System and Genetic Resources 17 October 2007 IP/C/W/493 Peru Combating Biopiracy — the Peruvian Experience 14 September 2007 IP/C/W/491 Norway The Relationship between the TRIPS Agreement, CBD, and Protection of Traditional Knowledge — Amending the TRIPS Agreement to Introduce an Obligation to Disclose the origin of Genetic Resources and Traditional Knowledge in Patent Applications — Answer from Norway to Questions Posed by Switzerland in the TRIPS Council 7 May 2007 IP/C/W/484 Peru Response to Comments Contained in Document IP/C/W/469 Relating to the Peruvian Communication IP/C/W/458 2 November 2006 IP/C/W/475 Brazil Response to Questions Raised on the Draft Amendment to TRIPS — Article 29bis 26 July 2006 IP/C/W/474 , Add.1 , Add.2 , Add.3 , Add.4 , Add.5 , Add.6 , Add.7 , Add.8 and  Add.9 Brazil, India and others Doha Work Programme — The Outstanding Implementation Issue on the Relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the Convention on Biological Diversity — Revision (Also circulated as WT/GC/W/564/Rev.2 and TN/C/W/41/Rev.2) 5 July 2006 IP/C/W/473 Norway The Relationship between the TRIPS Agreement, the Convention on Biological Diversity and the protection of traditional knowledge — Amending the TRIPS Agreement to Introduce an Obligation to Disclose the Origin of Genetic Resources and Traditional Knowledge in Patent Applications (Also circulated as WT/GC/W/566 and TN/C/W/42) 14 June 2006 IP/C/W/472 Japan The Patent System and Genetic Resources 13 June 2006 IP/C/W/470 Bolivia, Cuba, Ecuador, India, Sri Lanka and Thailand Submission in Response to the Communication from Switzerland (IP/C/W/446) 21 March 2006 IP/C/W/469 United States Article 27.3(b), Relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the CBD, and the Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Folklore 13 March 2006 IP/C/W/459 Brazil, India and others The relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the protection of traditional knowledge: Technical observations on the United States submission IP/C/W449 18 November 2005 IP/C/W/458 Peru Analysis of Potential Cases of Biopiracy 7 November 2005 IP/C/W/449 United States Article 27.3(b), relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the CBD, and the protection of traditional knowledge and folklore 10 June 2005 IP/C/W/447 Peru Article 27.3(b), relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the CBD and protection of traditional knowledge and folklore 8 June 2005 IP/C/W/446 Switzerland The relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the protection of traditional knowledge and folklore and the review of implementation of the TRIPS Agreement under Article 71.1 30 May 2005 IP/C/W/443 Brazil, India The relationship between the TRIPS agreement and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the protection of traditional knowledge. Technical observations on issues raised in a communication by the United States (IP/C/W/434) 18 March 2005 IP/C/W/442 India, Brazil, and others The relationship between the TRIPS agreement and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the protection of traditional knowledge — elements of the obligation to disclose evidence of benefit-sharing under the relevant national regime 18 March 2005 IP/C/W/441 Rev.1 Peru Article 27.3(b), relationship between the TRIPS agreement and the CBD and protection of traditional knowledge and folklore 19 May 2005 (original 8 March 2005) IP/C/W/438 India, Brazil, and others The relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the protection of traditional knowledge — elements of the obligation to disclose evidence of prior informed consent under the relevant national regime 10 December 2004 IP/C/W/434 US Article 27.3(b), relationship between the TRIPS agreement and the CBD, and the protection of traditional knowledge and folklore 26 November 2004 IP/C/W/433 Switzerland Further observations by Switzerland on its proposals regarding the declaration of the source of genetic resources and traditional knowledge in patent applications 25 November 2004 IP/C/W/429 , with Rev.1 , Add.1 , Add.2 , and Add.3 Brazil, India and others Elements of the Obligation to Disclose the Source and Country of Origin of Biological Resources and/or Traditional Knowledge used in an Invention 21 September 2004 to 10 February 2005 IP/C/W/423 Switzerland Additional Comments By Switzerland on its Proposal Submitted to WIPO Regarding the Declaration of Source of Genetic Resources and Traditional Knowledge in Patent Applications 26 June 2003 IP/C/W/420 and Add.1 India, Brazil, and others The Relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the CBD: Checklist of Issues 2 March 2004 IP/C/W/404 African group Taking Forward the Review of Article 27.3(b) of the TRIPS Agreement 26 June 2003 IP/C/W/403 India, Brazil, and others The Relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the CBD and the Protection of Traditional knowledge 24 June 2003 IP/C/W/400/ Rev.1 Switzerland Article 27.3(b), the Relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the CBD, and the Protection of Traditional Knowledge 18 June 2003 IP/C/W/393 US Access to Genetic Resources Regime of the US National Parks 28 January 2003 IP/C/W/383 EC Review of Article 27.3(b) of the TRIPS Agreement, and the Relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the CBD and the Protection of Traditional Knowledge and Folklore — “A Concept Paper” 17 October 2002 IP/C/W/356 and Add.1 India, Brazil, and others The Relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the CBD and the Protection of Traditional Knowledge 24 June 2002 IP/C/W/341 US Technology Transfer Practices of the US National Cancer Institute’s Departmental Therapeutics Programme 25 March 2002   More documents: Search Documents Online for all documents on Article 27.3b, traditional knowledge and biodiversity since 1995 These links open a new window: allow a moment for the results to appear.
Language:English
Score: 1346217.6 - https://www.wto.org/english/tratop_e/trips_e/art27_3b_e.htm
Data Source: un
FAO - SFM Case Detail: Experiences, case studies, and assessments FAO.org english Sustainable Forest Management (SFM) Toolbox Background Modules Tools Cases News E-learning Gateway Register Case Details Experiences, case studies, and assessments http://www.cbd.int/invasive/assessments.shtml The Conference of the Parties (COP) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) has recognized that there is an urgent need to address the impact of invasive alien species (IAS), and established IAS as a cross-cutting issue at its fourth meeting. The decision of COP 6 included adoption of Guiding Principles for the Prevention, Introduction and Mitigation of Impacts of Alien Species that Threaten Ecosystems, Habitats or Species (decision VI/23). (...) Type of Case Website Publisher CBD Region Global Biome All Forest Type All forest types (natural and planted) Primary Designated Function All Contact us Terms and Conditions Scam Alert Report Misconduct Jobs Procurement Governing Bodies Office of the Inspector General Evaluation Legal Office Ethics Office FAO organizational chart Regional Office for Africa Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific Regional Office for Europe and Central Asia Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean Regional Office for the Near East and North Africa Country Offices X Follow us on                                         Download our App © FAO, 2022
Language:English
Score: 1340327.5 - https://www.fao.org/sustainabl...cases/case-detail/en/c/230942/
Data Source: un
First, the dynamics and pyrotechnics that sparked the negotiations and adoption of the 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD); 5   second, the negotiations of the first major treaty under CBD auspices, namely the 2000 Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety; 6 and third, the negotiations and adoption of the 2010 Nagoya-Kuala Lumpur Supplementary Protocol on Liability and Redress to the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, 7 as well as the 2010 Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from Their Utilization to the Convention on Biological Diversity. 8 CBD was adopted with three major objectives: “…conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilization of genetic resources”. 9 Some of the main issues that States grappled with were: guiding principles and general obligations; jurisdiction; components of biodiversity; relationship with other international treaties; relationship with customary law; in situ and ex situ conservation; impact assessment; liability and redress; biotechnology and use of genetic resources; intellectual property rights; financial provisions; and a host of others which developed countries felt were very contentious issues. 10 The mandate of the CBD was so vast that while addressing biodiversity concerns, a more challenging problem arose—that of conflict between certain rules of international trade and mandates of other existing international treaties and processes. The negotiations of CBD, which were long and protracted, with participants often spending sleepless nights, created a deep sense of mistrust between the developed and the developing world. (...) The first instrument to be born out of CBD was the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety. The overarching and guiding principle of the Protocol was the precautionary approach contained in Principle 15 of the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development.
Language:English
Score: 1329260.8 - https://www.un.org/en/chronicl...itment-sustainable-development
Data Source: un
First, the dynamics and pyrotechnics that sparked the negotiations and adoption of the 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD); 5   second, the negotiations of the first major treaty under CBD auspices, namely the 2000 Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety; 6 and third, the negotiations and adoption of the 2010 Nagoya-Kuala Lumpur Supplementary Protocol on Liability and Redress to the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety, 7 as well as the 2010 Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from Their Utilization to the Convention on Biological Diversity. 8 CBD was adopted with three major objectives: “…conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilization of genetic resources”. 9 Some of the main issues that States grappled with were: guiding principles and general obligations; jurisdiction; components of biodiversity; relationship with other international treaties; relationship with customary law; in situ and ex situ conservation; impact assessment; liability and redress; biotechnology and use of genetic resources; intellectual property rights; financial provisions; and a host of others which developed countries felt were very contentious issues. 10 The mandate of the CBD was so vast that while addressing biodiversity concerns, a more challenging problem arose—that of conflict between certain rules of international trade and mandates of other existing international treaties and processes. The negotiations of CBD, which were long and protracted, with participants often spending sleepless nights, created a deep sense of mistrust between the developed and the developing world. (...) The first instrument to be born out of CBD was the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety. The overarching and guiding principle of the Protocol was the precautionary approach contained in Principle 15 of the Rio Declaration on Environment and Development.
Language:English
Score: 1329260.8 - https://www.un.org/en/node/25904
Data Source: un
Impact Global Citizens Resources News and Events Youth Guides Challenge Badges Resources Explore YUNGA’s range of resources on this page! (...) See UNFCCC document s: especially " Beginner's guide to the convention " and " Climate Change Information Kit " available in different languages. Mahiake et le gardien de la mangrove NY FIOMPIANA KARPA AN-TANIMBARY IZARASOA SY NY DINAN'ANDAVAKORANA The Shark Fin Soup The Smart Fish WOD 2016 Annual Report Infographics Addressing rural youth distress migration YUNGA Flyer EN  -  ES  -  FR  - HI -  IT - JP -  RU Useful Links Building the #ZeroHunger Generation International Day of Forests 2017  CBD: Biological diversity for kids CBD: The Green Wave Introduction to UNFCCC for kids Office of the Secretary General’s Envoy on Youth UNEP: TUNZA UNEP: Green Passport UNESCO Education portal UNFCCC Youth Portal UNFPA: Youth section of UNFPA UN HABITAT Youth UNICEF: Voices of Youth WHO Children and Youth World Bank: Youthink!
Language:English
Score: 1328357 - https://www.fao.org/yunga/resources/en/
Data Source: un
Paragraph 23 of the National Plan on CBD of Turkmenistan refers to the need to revive local traditional pasture management methods. (...) According to the Strategic Plan on CBD of Turkmenistan, one of the goals is to strengthen regional and international cooperation in order to exchange experiences and implement a biodiversity strategy and action plan on CBD. (...) The Kyrgyz Republic has acceded to CBD, the Nagoya Protocol, TRIPS, UNESCO Conventions, etc.
Language:English
Score: 1324720.6 - https://www.wto.org/english/tr...rs_e/2018/chapter_8_2018_e.pdf
Data Source: un
MEDIUM-TERM PROGRAMME OF WORK OF THE CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES
Distr. GENERAL UNEP/CBD/COP/1/13 25 October 1994 ORIGINAL: ENGLISH CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES TO THE CONVENTION ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY First meeting Nassau, 28 November - 9 December 1994 Item 9 of the provisional agenda MEDIUM-TERM PROGRAMME OF WORK OF THE CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES Note by the Interim Secretariat 1. (...) The matters contained in resolutions 2 and 3 were discussed by the Intergovernmental Committee at both its sessions, and recommendations have been made to the Conference of the Parties (see reports of the Intergovernmental Committee on its first and second sessions UNEP/CBD/COP/1/3 and UNEP/CBD/COP/1/4). 8. An agenda for scientific and technical research required to implement the provisions of the Convention is outlined in the report of the Open- ended Intergovernmental Meeting of Scientific Experts on Biological Diversity (UNEP/CBD/IC/2/11) and in the note on an Agenda for Scientific and Technical Research (UNEP/CBD/COP/1/16). 9. (...) UNEP/CBD/COP/1/13 Page 8 (d) Providing the organizing framework for the work of the Subsidiary Body on Scientific, Technical and Technological Advice; (e) Providing the basis upon which the work programme of the Secretariat to the Convention would be elaborated; (f) Providing guidance to other entities whose work may be relevant to the Convention; (g) Guiding the clearing-house mechanism and the financial mechanism in the development of their respective supports to the parties; (h) Indicating the nature of the tasks which the Convention machinery is intended to accomplish.
Language:English
Score: 1316649.8 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...en&DS=UNEP/CBD/COP/1/13&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
The Executive Secretary of the CBD, Dr. Braulio Dias made a presentation focusing on the close inter relationship between the three objectives of the CBD. The Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) was adopted in 1992 and now has near- universal membership with 193 Parties. (...) Shakeel Bhatti made a presentation focusing on the relationship between the ITPGRFA and CBD, the ITPGRFA’s core ABS system and ongoing collaboration. 17.
Language:English
Score: 1313593.3 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/second/68/cbdsummary.pdf
Data Source: un
The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has a longstanding history of collaborating with the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), as evidenced by a number of decisions and joint work programmes adopted or endorsed by the CBD Conference and Governing and Statutory Bodies of FAO. The CBD Programme of Work on Agricultural Biodiversity,1 adopted in the follow-up to a joint FAO/ CBD assessment of instruments in this area, identifies assessments, adaptive management, capacity building and mainstreaming as important cornerstones of this collaboration. (...) The CBD secretariat and FAO consult regularly and closely collaborate in the preparation of COP-13. 6.
Language:English
Score: 1308315.8 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/..._WITHIN_AND_ACROSS_SECTORS.pdf
Data Source: un