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Challenges of daylighting • Glare is experienced when direct sunlight penetrates into buildings and reflects off surfaces, causing visual discomfort. (...) Daylight availability The source of daylight is the sun and it may reach the building in the following ways as illustrated by Figure 01. • Direct sunlight along a straight path from the sun, through an opening to a given point; • Diffuse light through the sky and clouds; • Reflected light – either externally by the ground and surrounding buildings or internally by walls, ceilings and other internal surfaces These factors determine the illuminance level at any point in the room. (...) Phillips, D. (2004) Daylighting: Natural Light in Architecture. Amsterdam; Boston: Architectural Press.
Language:English
Score: 1196921.4 - https://unhabitat.org/sites/default/files/2020/07/gh070e.pdf
Data Source: un
Well from an African perspective, I believe FLW can be addressed through the processing of such foods by natural means (drying). Most African countries are blessed with abundant sunlight.
Language:English
Score: 1189582.3 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/zh-hans/comment/9511
Data Source: un
السيد Jean-Laurent Bungener consultant فرنسا 13.02.2013 Trees are the better way to preserve soil living organisms and manage microclimate that limit quick change in soil exposure to drought and sunlight or running water But this take time. Depending on the local climate 15 years to 50 years are necessary to benefit of trees effect. (...) This is for me the key challenge, not misuse natural capital. One concrete example was the presence of earthworm under old faidherbia tree on the top of a hill in burkina faso under minus 600mM annual  rainfall. earthworms benefit of faidherbia impact on soil humidity and earthworm have theyre cast under the top soil layer.
Language:English
Score: 1189582.3 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/ar/comment/4945
Data Source: un
السيد Jean-Laurent Bungener consultant فرنسا 13.02.2013 Trees are the better way to preserve soil living organisms and manage microclimate that limit quick change in soil exposure to drought and sunlight or running water But this take time. Depending on the local climate 15 years to 50 years are necessary to benefit of trees effect. (...) This is for me the key challenge, not misuse natural capital. One concrete example was the presence of earthworm under old faidherbia tree on the top of a hill in burkina faso under minus 600mM annual  rainfall. earthworms benefit of faidherbia impact on soil humidity and earthworm have theyre cast under the top soil layer.
Language:English
Score: 1189582.3 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/index.php/ar/comment/4945
Data Source: un
Sun Path: Understanding the movement of the sun during the day and throughout the year allows for a qualitative analysis of the sunlight or shading of a site or part of a building. (...) On the roof, use light-coloured surfaces which refl ect more sunlight and absorb less heat. Step 4: Energy Solar energy: With an appropriate urban design, buildings are oriented along the East- West axis. (...) Vegetation 3. Permeable area 4. Natural vertical ventilation 5. Natural lighting 6.
Language:English
Score: 1187714.2 - https://unhabitat.org/sites/default/files/2020/07/gh059e.pdf
Data Source: un
(c) This resistance may be weakened under the action of direct sunlight. (d) The natural fertility of the bottom soil will be lost, and it will take some time to develop it over the membrane. 3. (...) TABLE 4 Relative properties and requirements of synthetic membranes Properties Thermo-plastic membranes Elastomer membranes Polyethylene (PE) Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) Butyl rubber Relative cost Small Medium High Ageing Good Not so good Good Resistance to impact Low Medium High Susceptibility to sunlight Poor to medium 1 Medium to good Protection required Normal use Soil layer at least 15 cm thick None Trampling by livestock, people, equipment Soil layer at least 25 cm thick with bottom 7.5 cm very fine sand 2 Soil layer 20-25 cm thick with bottom 7.5 cm very fine sand Joining or patching Heat, special cement, or tape Solvent cement Special cement Minimum membrane thickness over sands 0.20 mm or 8 mils 0.20 mm or 8 mils 0.38 mm or 15 mils over gravels 0.38 mm or 15 mils 0.38 mm or 15 mils 0.76 mm or 30 mils Placement in pond Lay with 10% slack Lay smooth but slack Lay smooth but slack 1 During manufacture, can be treated for increased resistance to sunlight 2 In some cases, a layer of geotextile is used to give additional strength. (...) If so, you should use a covering sheet of plastic, butyl or felt over the upper edge that extends at least 20 cm below the pond water level to protect the main membrane from heat and sunlight. The sheet can be dug into the same trench as the main membrane.
Language:English
Score: 1187394.9 - https://www.fao.org/fishery/st...ng/General/x6709e/x6709e03.htm
Data Source: un
STUDY ON THE CLIMATIC AND OTHER GLOBAL EFFECTS OF NUCLEAR WAR : REPORT OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
Beyond one month, agriculturaL production and the survival of natural ecosysgems would be threatened by a considerable reduction in sunlight, temPerature depressions of several degrees below normal and suppression of precipitation and summer monsoons. (...) Dust effectively scatters sunlight, reflecting a portioa of the incoming solar radiation back to sPace. (...) Dense patches of dust could cause significant reduction of sunlight reaching the surface underlying the cloud.
Language:English
Score: 1177615.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...sf/get?open&DS=A/43/351&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
The following slight defects, however, may be allowed, provided these do not affect the general appearance of the produce, the quality, the keeping quality and presentation in the package: „ a slight defect in shape „ slight skin defects due to rubbing or sunburn, suberized stains due to resin exudation (elongated trails included) and healed bruises not exceeding 3, 4, 5, 6 cm2 for size groups A, B, C, D respectively „ scattered rusty, black or white lenticels „ a yellowing of green varieties due to exposure to direct sunlight, not exceeding 40% of the surface of the fruit, excluding necrotic stains. 2.2.3 Class II This class includes mangoes which do not qualify for inclusion in the higher classes, but satisfy the minimum requirements specified in Section 2.1 above. (...) In Classes I and II, scattered suberized rusty lenticels, as well as yellowing of green varieties due to exposure to direct sunlight, not exceeding 40% of the surface and not showing any signs of necrosis are allowed. allowed, provided the mangoes retain their essential characteristics as regards the quality, the keeping quality and presentation: - defects in shape; - skin defects due to rubbing or sunburn, suberized stains due to resin exudation (elongated trails included) and healed bruises not exceeding 4 cm² for size groups A and B, 5 cm² for size group C, 6 cm² for size group D, and 7 cm² for size group E. In Classes I and II, scattered suberized rusty lenticels, as well as yellowing of green varieties due to exposure to direct sunlight, not exceeding 40% of the surface and not showing any signs of necrosis are allowed. the mangoes retain their essential characteristics as regards the quality, the keeping quality and presentation: „ defects in shape „ skin defects due to rubbing or sunburn, suberized stains due to resin exudation (elongated trails included) and healed bruises not exceeding 5, 6, 7, 8 cm2 for size groups A, B, C, D respectively „ scattered rusty, black or white lenticels „ a yellowing of green varieties due to exposure to direct sunlight, not exceeding 40% of the surface of the fruit, excluding necrotic stains. 3.
Language:English
Score: 1171980.9 - https://unece.org/DAM/trade/ag...CE_CodexStdsMango_Surapong.pdf
Data Source: un