Home

关于 81 - 90 结果 957,237Organization repair. 搜索用时 8.786 秒.  
按日期排序/按关联排序
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON THE HUMAN RIGHTS OF MIGRANTS, JORGE BUSTAMANTE : ADDENDUM
During the NGO briefings in Atlanta, the Special Rapporteur heard from migrants and migrant human rights advocates from different organizations and who travelled from across the southern United States, including the Mississippi Immigrant Rights Alliance (MIRA), the New Orleans Workers’ Center for Racial Justice, the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), Queer Progressive Agenda (QPA), Raksha (South Asian community organization), the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund (MALDEF), the Georgia Department of Education Program, and the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Atlanta. Migrants and NGO advocates from these and other organization informed the Special Rapporteur of the plight of migrants in the south of the United States, where the migrant population is booming. 6.
语言:中文
得分: 869469.3 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...pen&DS=A/HRC/7/12/ADD.2&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
LETTER DATED 26 JANUARY 2018 FROM THE PANEL OF EXPERTS ON YEMEN MANDATED BY SECURITY COUNCIL RESOLUTION 2342 (2017) ADDRESSED TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL
107 sputniknews.com/middleeast/201703301052137016-yeminis-repair-soviet-missiles/。 108 https://english.alarabiya.net/en/features/2018/01/01/Who-are-the-Iranian-Revolutionary-Guard- officers-leading-Houthis-in-Yemen-.html。
语言:中文
得分: 867306.7 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...f/get?open&DS=S/2018/68&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
LETTER DATED 26 JANUARY 2018 FROM THE PANEL OF EXPERTS ON YEMEN MANDATED BY SECURITY COUNCIL RESOLUTION 2342 (2017) ADDRESSED TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL
107 sputniknews.com/middleeast/201703301052137016-yeminis-repair-soviet-missiles/。 108 https://english.alarabiya.net/en/features/2018/01/01/Who-are-the-Iranian-Revolutionary-Guard- officers-leading-Houthis-in-Yemen-.html。
语言:中文
得分: 867306.7 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc.../get?open&DS=S/2018/594&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
SG LETTER OF 29 MARCH 2017 ADDRESSED TO THE PSC (COLOMBIA)
The reform recognizes the productive and reproductive role of women and thus their fundamental contribution to rural development and the rural economy; and it will make every endeavour on their behalf and on that of the most vulnerable in society to guarantee conditions of well-being and quality of life and to consolidate their modes of organization and production. In the area of food and nutrition, comprehensive rural reform aims to ensure that the entire rural and urban population in Colombia has sufficient access to and availability of the foodstuffs they need for proper nutrition, in terms of timeliness, quantity, quality and price, especially in the case of boys and girls, pregnant or breast-feeding women and older adults, with priority given to food production and income generation. __________________ 1 Pursuant to Act No. 731 of 2002 establishing regulations in favour of rural women, a rural woman is any woman who, without distinction of any kind and irrespective of where she may live, takes part in a productive activity directly relating to the countryside, even where said activity is not recognized by the State’s information and measurement systems, or is unremunerated.
语言:中文
得分: 867150 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc.../get?open&DS=S/2017/272&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
IDENTICAL LETTERS DATED 10 AUGUST 2012 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF TH
Military engineering units were able to defuse five devices weighing 30 kg at the entrance to the city of Hamah, Muhradah Road and in the vicinity of the Khalidiyah roundabout. 2. 1500 Armed terrorists set fire to an ambulance belonging to the National Hospital in Suqaylibiyah when the ambulance was in a repair workshop. 3. 1710 An armed terrorist group detonated a booby-trapped car at the Ulayliyat Induction Branch, causing damage. 4
语言:中文
得分: 865972.8 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce.../get?open&DS=S/2012/623&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
HUMAN RIGHTS SITUATION IN PALESTINE AND OTHER OCCUPIED ARAB TERRITORIES :WRITTEN SUBMISSION BY THE INDEPENDENT COMMISSION FOR HUMAN RIGHTS OF THE STATE OF PALESTINE : NOTE / BY THE SECRETARIAT
The Israeli occupying power have set stringent requirements to restrict access to obtain construction licences or to repair and renovate existing homes. In this context, the Israeli High Court of Justice rendered a decision, approving the demolition of Khan al-Ahmar Bedouin community east of occupied Jerusalem, including the community’s mosque and school.
语言:中文
得分: 865972.8 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...t?open&DS=A/HRC/39/NI/2&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
LETTER DATED 25 FEBRUARY 2021 FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL AND THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVES OF THE MEMBERS OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL
.: General 25 February 2021 Resolution 2564 (2021) Adopted by the Security Council on 25 February 2021 The Security Council, Recalling all its previous relevant resolutions and statements of its President concerning Yemen, Reaffirming its strong commitment to the unity, sovereignty, independence, and territorial integrity of Yemen, Strongly condemning the ongoing escalation in Marib, Yemen, including the Houthi operation on 7 February 2021, and the continuation of Houthi attacks on Saudi Arabia, including on Abha International Airport, on 10 February 2021, and calling for an immediate cessation of attacks without preconditions, Stressing the need for de-escalation across Yemen and a nationwide ceasefire, and calling for implementation of the Secretary General's Global Ceasefire call as detailed in resolution 2532 (2020), as well as his 25 March 2020 call for an immediate cessation of hostilities in Yemen, Expressing concern at the ongoing political, security, economic and humanitarian challenges in Yemen, including the ongoing violence and enforced disappearances, and threats arising from the illicit transfer, diversion, destabilising accumulation, and misuse of weapons, Emphasising the environmental and humanitarian risk and the need, without delay, for access of UN officials to inspect and maintain the Safer oil tanker, which is located in the Houthi-controlled North of Yemen, and stressing Houthi responsibility for the situation and for not responding to this major environmental and humanitarian risk, and underscoring the need for the Houthis to urgently facilitate unconditional and safe access for United Nations experts to conduct an assessment and repair mission without further delay, ensuring close cooperation with the United Nations, Reiterating its call for all parties in Yemen to adhere to resolving their differences through dialogue and consultation, reject acts of violence to achieve political goals, and refrain from provocation, S/2021/189 3/6 21-02682 Reaffirming the need for all parties to comply with their obligations under international law, including international humanitarian law and international human rights law as applicable, and underlining the need to ensure accountability for violations of international humanitarian law and violations and abuses of human rights in Yemen, Expressing its support for and commitment to the work of the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen in support of the Yemeni transition process, and an inclusive Yemeni-led and Yemeni-owned political process, under UN auspices, with the full effective, and meaningful participation of women, and affirming the equality of the sexes and the need for full implementation of Yemen’s National Action Plan in accordance with resolution 1325 (2000), Welcoming the formation of the new cabinet of Yemen’s government, under the provisions of the Riyadh Agreement, calling for the full implementation of the Riyadh Agreement, and expressing support for the cabinet’s participation in the political process and calling for the swift resumption of talks between the parties, in full engagement with UN mediation efforts, Expressing its alarm that areas of Yemen remain under the control of Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) and about the negative impact of their presence, violent extremist ideology and actions on stability in Yemen, the Middle East region, and the Horn of Africa, including the devastating humanitarian impact on the civilian populations, expressing concern at the increasing presence and future potential growth of the Islamic State in Iraq and Levant (ISIL, also known as Da’esh) affiliates in Yemen, and reaffirming its resolve to address all aspects of the threat posed by AQAP, ISIL (Da’esh), and all other associated individuals, groups, undertakings and entities, Recalling the listing of AQAP and associated individuals on the ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida Sanctions List and stressing in this regard the need for robust implementation of the measures in paragraph 1 of resolution 2368 (2017) as a significant tool in combating terrorist activity in Yemen, Noting the critical importance of effective implementation of the sanctions regime imposed pursuant to resolution 2140 (2014) and resolution 2216 (2015), including the key role that Member States from the region can play in this regard, Encouraging efforts to further enhance cooperation, Condemning in the strongest terms the attack on Aden airport on 30 December 2020, which killed twenty seven innocent civilians, including a Yemeni Deputy Minister and three humanitarian and health personnel, and noting the planned Panel of Expert reporting on the Aden attack, Welcoming the work of the Panel of Experts on Yemen, established pursuant to resolution 2140 (2014), and which overcame the logistical challenges posed by Covid-19, Expressing grave concern at the threat to peace and security in Yemen arising from the illicit transfer, destabilising accumulation, and misuse of small arms and light weapons, Recalling the provisions of paragraph 14 of resolution 2216 (2015) imposing a targeted arms embargo, and calling on all Member States and other actors to comply with their obligations under the targeted arms embargo, Condemning the increasing number of incidents off the coast of Yemen, including attacks on civilian and commercial ships, and expressing concern over maritime smuggling of arms and related materials into and out of Yemen in violation S/2021/189 21-02682 4/6 of the targeted arms embargo, which pose a significant risk to the maritime security of vessels in the Gulf of Aden and Red Sea along the coast of Yemen, Condemning in the strongest terms violations of International Humanitarian Law and International Human Rights Law, as well as human rights abuses, including those involving conflict-related sexual violence in Houthi-controlled areas and recruitment and use of children in armed conflict across Yemen, as recorded in the Panel of Experts’ final report (S/2021/79), Expressing alarm over the obstacles that have been imposed on the work and access of the Panel of Experts during the course of its last mandate, Expressing serious concern at the devastating humanitarian situation in Yemen, including the growing risk of large-scale famine and the negative consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, and all instances of undue hindrances to the effective delivery of humanitarian assistance, including the recent interference in aid operations in Houthi-controlled areas as well as obstacles and the undue limitations on the delivery of vital goods to the civilian population occurring throughout Yemen, which is preventing vulnerable people from receiving the assistance they need to survive, Emphasising the necessity of discussion by the Committee established pursuant to paragraph 19 of resolution 2140 (2014) (“the Committee”) of the recommendations contained in the Panel of Experts reports, Determining that the situation in Yemen continues to constitute a threat to international peace and security, Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations, 1.
语言:中文
得分: 865972.8 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc.../get?open&DS=S/2021/189&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
LETTER DATED 27 APRIL 2021 FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL AND THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVES OF THE MEMBERS OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL
.: General 27 April 2021 Resolution 2573 (2021) Adopted by the Security Council on 27 April 2021 The Security Council, Reiterating its primary responsibility under the Charter of the United Nations for the maintenance of international peace and security and, in this context, the need to promote and ensure respect for international humanitarian law, Recalling all relevant Security Council resolutions, including resolutions 1265 (1999), 1894 (2009), 1998 (2011), 2175 (2014), 2286 (2016), 2417 (2018), and its Presidential Statements of 12 February 1999 (S/PRST/1999/6), 12 February 2013 (S/PRST/2013/2), 9 August 2017 (S/PRST/2017/14), 20 August 2019 (S/PRST/2019/8), and 29 April 2020 (S/PRST/2020/6), Reaffirming the full respect for the sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of all States in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, Reiterating the primary responsibility of States to protect the population throughout their territories, Gravely concerned about the level of violence against civilians in situations of armed conflicts, including indiscriminate attacks and establishment of military positions in densely populated areas, and their devastating impacts upon civilians, Emphasising with deep concern that ongoing armed conflicts have devastating impacts on civilians and civilian objects, including civilians engaged in duties related to the operation, maintenance or repair of civilian infrastructure that is critical to the delivery of essential services to the civilian population and their assets that are civilian as such, and on objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population, exacerbate existing socio-economic fragilities and vulnerabilities, overstretch limited resources, resulting in reduced access to essential services such as health care, water, sanitation, energy, posing devastating consequences for the civilian population, and hindering an effective humanitarian response, Recognizing the interconnectedness of certain essential services, as well as the vulnerabilities of objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population that can be damaged in situations of armed conflict, S/2021/407 21-05591 4/6 Reiterating the call on all parties to armed conflict to comply with their obligations under international humanitarian law including regarding respecting and protecting civilians and taking constant care to spare civilian objects, including such objects critical to the delivery of essential services to the civilian population, refraining from attacking, destroying, removing or rendering useless objects that are indispensable to the survival of the civilian population and respecting and protecting humanitarian personnel and consignments used for humanitarian relief operations, Further expressing concern about the misuse of objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population in contravention of applicable international law, that may endanger civilians and their ability to access essential services in situations of armed conflict, Recalling its deep concern at the military use of schools in contravention of applicable international law, recognising that such use may render schools legitimate targets of attack, thus endangering children’s and teachers’ safety as well as children’s education, Noting with concern the threats posed to civilian infrastructure, including that which supports essential services to the civilian population, by the use of any means or methods of warfare in violation of international humanitarian law, and the potentially devastating humanitarian impact of such use in situations of armed conflict, Noting that armed conflicts, violations of international humanitarian law and international human rights law, and destruction of or other damage to objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population can reduce or deprive civilians of access to essential services in situations of armed conflicts, and can be drivers of or aggravate forced displacement, compound the spread of infectious diseases in these contexts and hamper an effective public health response, Reiterating its commitment to pursue all possible avenues to prevent and end armed conflicts, including through addressing their underlying root causes in an inclusive, integrated and sustainable manner, Reiterating the need to strengthen efforts to resolve armed conflict and build sustainable peace and convinced that the protection of civilians in armed conflict and the protection of objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population should be an important aspect in this regard, Reiterating deep concern at the increasing number of civilians in ongoing armed conflict and related violence facing the threat of conflict -induced food insecurity and the threat of famine, Noting that the humanitarian situation in many armed conflicts can also be compounded by economic crises, increasingly frequent and severe weather events, and natural disasters and has deteriorated as a result of the impacts of the COVID -19 pandemic and, in this regard, reaffirming the need for combatting and sustainably recovering from the pandemic, Recalling the obligations of all parties to armed conflicts under international law, including international human rights law, as applicable, and international humanitarian law including the prohibition of attacks directed against civilians and civilian objects, medical personnel and humanitarian personnel exclusively engaged in medical duties, their means of transport and equipment, hospitals, and other medical facilities, Underlining the obligations of all parties to armed conflicts under international humanitarian law related to protecting civilians and civilian objects, meeting the basic S/2021/407 5/6 21-05591 needs of the civilian population within their territory or under their control, and allowing and facilitating the rapid and unimpeded passage of impartial humanitarian relief to all those in need, Stressing the particular impact that armed conflict has on women, children, including as refugees and internally displaced persons, and other civilians who may have specific vulnerabilities including persons with disabilities and older persons, including through increased risk of violence and lack of access to essential services, and stressing the protection and assistance needs of all affected civilian populations, Recalling its practice that mandates of UN peacekeeping and other relevant missions include, where appropriate and on a case-by-case basis, provisions regarding the protection of civilians, Stressing the need to fight against impunity and the importance of ensuring accountability for serious violations of international law, including international humanitarian law and international human rights law, Recognising the need to return as quickly as possible and in an inclusive and equitable manner provision of essential services, while building back better and providing more resilient essential services to the civilian population, in contributing to advancing the comprehensive approach to sustaining peace in countries in situations of armed conflict and post-conflict, and in this regard, welcoming relevant international and regional cooperation, 1.
语言:中文
得分: 865972.8 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc.../get?open&DS=S/2021/407&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON THE INDEPENDENCE OF JUDGES AND LAWYERS, LEANDRO DESPOUY : ADDENDUM
He also met with representatives from various international organizations and national cooperation agencies, including the American Bar Association’s Central European and Eurasian Law Initiative (ABA/CEELI), the Department for International Development (DFID) and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE). 4.
语言:中文
得分: 857370.1 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...DS=E/CN.4/2006/52/ADD.3&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
IMPLEMENTATION REPORT ON THE UNITED NATIONS GUIDELINES ON CONSUMER PROTECTION, 1985U+20132013 : NOTE / BY THE UNCTAD SECRETARIAT
TD/B/C.I/CLP/23 GE.13-50577 23 28 For example, Costa Rica, Malaysia. 29 For example, Botswana (Consumer Protection Office), Colombia (Superintendencia de Industria y Comercio), Costa Rica (Dirección de Apoyo al Consumidor), Malaysia (Ministry of Domestic Trade, Cooperatives and Consumerism), the United Republic of Tanzania (Fair Competition Commission). 30 For example, Bhutan (Office of Consumer Protection and Bhutan Agriculture and Food Regulatory Authority), the Dominican Republic (ProConsumidor and Ministerio de Industria y Comercio), the European Union (South African National Civic Organization), El Salvador (Defensoría del Consumidor, Ministerio de Salud and Consejo Nacional de Caldiad), Egypt (Consumer Protection Agency and Internal Trade Supply Police), Fiji (Department of Trade and Standards – Ministry of Industry and Trade), Indonesia (Ministry of Trade), Malaysia (Ministry of Health, Ministry of Domestic Trade, Cooperatives and Consumerism), Mexico (Profeco and Secretaría de Economía). 31 Related language is contained in the OECD Recommendation of the Council concerning Risk Management and Cost-Benefit Analysis in the Product Safety Field (http://acts.oecd.org/Instruments /ShowInstrumentView.aspx? (...) For that purpose, the OAS contributes to strengthening the institutional capacity at the national and regional levels through the organization of training activities and the promotion of the exchange of good practices. (...) TD/B/C.I/CLP/23 26 GE.13-50577 61 Consumers International suggests reference to the anti-competitive effects of certain international agreements including those reached by governments, e.g. the World Trade Organization agriculture and intellectual property agreements. 62 Poland (the Office of Competition and Consumer Protection runs an educational campaign entitled “Entrepreneur, don’t collude!”
语言:中文
得分: 856208.3 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...open&DS=TD/B/C.I/CLP/23&Lang=C
数据资源: ods