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For pest suppression , it is preferable to use mechanical control, biological control involving the use of natural enemies and biopesticides, and other sustainable methods rather than synthetic pesticides. IPM requires an understanding of the ecology of the forest, as well as knowledge of the biology of the affected (tree) species and of the pest and its natural control agents. For IPM to be effective, field staff must be trained to recognize pests, monitor population levels and use biological control agents and other suitable control methods. (...) Transport logs during the dormancy period of known pests and apply appropriate control measures at the final destination before the pests emerge.
Language:English
Score: 1350819.1 - https://www.fao.org/sustainabl...forest-pests/in-more-depth/en/
Data Source: un
Following the successful control of the biggest desert locust upsurge witnessed in decades, Kenya has taken lead in the development of a Migratory and Invasive Pests and Weeds Management Strategy. (...) Following the successful control of the biggest desert locust upsurge witnessed in decades, Kenya has taken lead in the development of a Migratory and Invasive Pests and Weeds Management Strategy. (...) Following the successful control of the biggest desert locust upsurge witnessed in decades, Kenya has taken lead in the development of a Migratory and Invasive Pests and Weeds Management Strategy.
Language:English
Score: 1344540.2 - https://www.fao.org/kenya/news/detail-events/en/c/1471396/
Data Source: un
They proposed that the goal of pest control strategies was to tolerate pest populations that were below specified threshold levels. (...) Reynolds to an FAO symposium in 1966 concerning the ecological approach inherent in integrated pest control. Box 6.1 Principles of integrated pest control 1. (...) Smith and H.T Reynolds 1966) Integrated pest control eventually became integrated pest management.
Language:English
Score: 1340212.7 - https://www.fao.org/3/ac834e/ac834e08.htm
Data Source: un
Use an ecosystem approach to prevent and or/suppress harmful organisms and anticipate potential pest problems. To reduce crops losses, control strategies   should take advantage of beneficial species of pest predators, parasites and competitors.  (...) This includes: modifying current practices with priority given to sustainable, biological and physical, provided that they supply satisfactory pest control identifying methods of biological control or disease suppression determining if pest control campaigns or activities should be established 4.  (...) Prevent buildup of pests or decrease their pest status Pest-resistant or highly competitive crop varieties Field sanitation, use of quality seeds and seed bed sanitation Crop rotation Inter-cropping Management of sowing, planting or harvesting dates Water/irrigation management Soil and nutrient management (including mulching, zero/low tillage, fertilizer management, proper irrigation) Hand-picking of pests or hand-weeding Traps or trap crops Mechanical/physical controls (including barriers, crushing devices and use of heat) Post-harvest loss prevention Manage pest populations using biological inputs ( Biological pest control agents are naturally occurring agents that are distinguished from conventional chemical pesticides by their unique modes of action, low use volume, and target species specificity.)
Language:English
Score: 1339515.5 - https://www.fao.org/pest-and-p...m/principles-and-practices/zh/
Data Source: un
Depending on the specifics of the pest populations in question, the following two main areas can be identified: phytosanitary matters (or plant health matters); pest control Modern approaches to crop protection combine various methods of pest control (agrotechnical, selection of tolerant/resistant cultivars, biological pest control, chemical pest control, etc.) to protect the crops at the minimum costs to the environment. Awareness of pest control methods that are alternatives to the use of chemicals is still insufficient. (...) A separate category includes projects on systems for the control of transboundary pests, such as locusts or wheat rusts. 
Language:English
Score: 1337185.5 - https://www.fao.org/europe/kno...estsandpesticidemanagement/en/
Data Source: un
The purpose of the IPPC is to secure common and effective action to prevent the spread and introduction of pests of plants and plant products and to promote appropriate measures for their control. (...) Monitoring and survelliance is thus important to ensure that new incursions are discovered before extensive damage occurs, and to provide data to support decisions on appropriate tactics of control once a problem has been detected. Integrated pest management (IPM) : “ is the careful consideration of all available pest control techniques and subsequent integration of appropriate measures that discourage the development of pest populations. (...) The use of IPM implies that pest management programmes are designed as an integral part of forest management, including both prevention and control strategies.
Language:English
Score: 1328515.2 - https://www.fao.org/forestry/pests/99467/en/
Data Source: un
WEB ANNEXES FOR THE REVISED PROGRAMME OF WORK AND BUDGET 2006-07 Programme 2C: Diseases and pests of animals and plants Programme Entity Time Frame Title 2CA02 2002-2009 Sustainable Intensification of Livestock Production Systems through Nuclear Techniques and Biotechnology 2CP01 2002-2011 Secretariat of the International Plant Protection Convention (IPPC) 2CP02 2002-2011 Pesticide Risk Reduction through Pesticide Management, IPM and the use of Biopesticides 2CP04 2006-2011 EMPRES - Migratory and Transboundary Invasive Plant Pests 2CP05 2006-2011 EMPRES - Progressive Control of Transboundary Animal Diseases 2CS01 2006-2011 Technical Support Services to Members and the Field Programme 2CA02: Sustainable Intensification of Livestock Production Systems through Nuclear Techniques and Biotechnology Development problem to be addressed: 53.     (...) It is predicated on the assumption that effective multilateral action is necessary to prevent the spread and introduction of pests and to promote measures for their control. (...) Regional and interregional cooperation and coordination for the management of these pests, including deployment of IPM strategies. Major Output(s) Desert Locust Information Service providing monthly bulletins, forecasts and special alerts Global and Regional Coordination of Desert Locust Management systems Strengthened national early warning and control capacities for desert locust management including contingency planning Technical advisory services to Governments on migratory pest control Early warning on transboundary invasive (non-migratory) pests Early reaction through national and supranational IPM strategies and programmes on transboundary invasive non-migratory pests Indicator(s) Effective use by National Plant Protection Services of upgraded electronic communication, data management and analysis systems and improved reporting procedures Effective use of improved applications and alternatives to chemical pesticides, especially environmentally friendly biopesticides Outcomes of reviews of the desert locust control capacity of selected countries aimed at enhancing contingency planning processes Improved national capacity to train field staff in locust survey reporting and control on a regular and sustainable basis Examples of policy decisions to control transboundary pests agreed among nations of the same region Improved national and regional strategies for transboundary invasive pests targeted by EMPRES 2CP05: EMPRES - Progressive Control of Transboundary Animal Diseases Development problem to be addressed: 69.    
Language:English
Score: 1328256.3 - https://www.fao.org/pwb/2007/J7290Add1e/J7290Add1e09.htm
Data Source: un
Integrated Pest Management (IPM) | Pest and Pesticide Management | Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations | IPM and Pesticide Risk Reduction | Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO.org العربية 中文 english français Русский Español Pest and Pesticide Management About Integrated Pest Management Pesticide Risk Reduction Guidelines/Standards Resources Partners News Principles and practices Desert Locust Fall Armyworm Wheat Rust Integrated Pest Management Integrated Pest Management (IPM) was developed in response to steadily increasing pesticide use that resulted in pest control crises (outbreaks of secondary pests and pest resurgence following development of pesticide resistance) and increasing evidence and awareness of the full costs to human health and the environment of the intensive use of pesticides. IPM  is the careful consideration of all available pest control techniques and subsequent integration of appropriate measures that discourage the development of pest populations. (...) It promotes the growth of a healthy crop with the least possible disruption to agro-ecosystems and encourages natural pest control mechanisms. The role of IPM in sustainable agriculture: Applies sustainable pest control
Language:English
Score: 1325914.8 - https://www.fao.org/pest-and-p...integrated-pest-management/en/
Data Source: un
General terms In this law the following general terms are applied: - quarantine – official confinement under restricted quarantine arrangements of under- quarantine material for observation and investigation or for subsequent inspection, testing and/or treatment; - plants – living plants and plants thereof, including seeds and genetic material; - plant quarantine – activities, designed to prevent the introduction and/or spread of quarantine pests organisms or to ensure their official control; - plant products – unmanufactured material of plant origin (including grain) and those manufactured products that, by their nature or that of their processing, may create a risk for the introduction and spread of pests; - under-quarantine material (regulated article) - any plant, plant product, storage place, packaging, transport, container, soil or any other organism, object or material, capable of harboring or spreading pests, deemed to require phytosanitary measures, particularly where international transportation is involved; - fumigation - treatment with a chemical agent that reaches the commodity wholly or partially in a gaseous state; - degassing - removal of poisonous substances; - quarantine phytosanitary measures - official measures or regulation, having the purpose to prevent the introduction or spread of quarantine pests, or to limit the economic impact of regulated non-quarantine pests; - pest – any type, species or biotype of plant, animals or pathogenic agents, injurious to plants or plant products; - quarantine pest – a pest of potential economic importance to the area endangered thereby and yet not present there or present, but not widely distributed and being officially controlled; - introduction – introduction of pest leading to its establishment; - quarantine phytosanitary area – an area, where a quarantine phytosanitary regime is declared as a result of detecting quarantine pests; - quarantine phytosanitary regime – quarantine phytosanitary measures, taken in a quarantine phytosanitary area; - phytosanitary certification – use of phytosanitary procedures leading to the issue of a phytosanitary certificate; - phytosanitary certificate – document, which approves conformity of under-quarantine material with rules and norms of plant quarantine; - state quarantine phytosanitary control – active implementation of obligatory phytosanitary regalements, as well as obligatory phytosanitary procedures having the purpose to destruct (liquidat) or localize quarantine pests or to manage regulated non- quarantine pests; - rules and norms for plant quarantine – regulatory legal acts, regulatory-technical and methodical documentation on plant quarantine; - import quarantine permit – official document, authorizing importation of the commodity in accordance with specified phytosanitary import requirements; - consignment – a quantity of plants, plant products and/or other materials, being moved from one country to another and covered (when required) by a single phytosanitary (a consignment may be composed of one or more commodities or lots); - lot – a number of units of a single commodity, identifiable by its homogeneity composition, origin, etc. forming part of a consignment; - free area – an area in which a specific pest does not occur demonstrated by scientific evidence, and in which, where appropriate, this condition is being officially maintained; - phytosanitary risk assessment - the process of evaluating biological or other scientific and economic evidence to determine whether an organism is a pest and the strength of phytosanitary measures to be taken against it; - consignment in transit – a consignment, which passes through a country without being imported, and that may be subject to phytosanitary measures; - re-exported consignment - consignment that has been imported into a country from which it is then exported. (...) Competence of the authorized state body Competence of the authorized state body: - secures following of plant quarantine rules and norms and ensures quarantine phytosanitary control on territory of the Republic of Tajikistan; - develops rules and norms of plant quarantine; - develops and approves the list of quarantine pests; - defines principles of classification of quarantine pests and delivery of phytosanitary pest risk analysis in accordance with the principles of international standards; - performs phytosanitary certification of under-quarantine material and issues phytosanitary certificate; - issues import quarantine permit for the import of under-quarantine material in accordance with the principles of international standards; - prepares a list of under-quarantine materials in accordance with the requirements of international standards and presents to the Government of the Republic of Tajikistan for adoption; - defines (stipulates) conditions and requirements in relation to under-quarantine materials at the time of importation to the Republic of Tajikistan and exportation from the Republic of Tajikistan in accordance with the principles of international standards; - controls the performance of phytosanitary measures against quarantine pests; - assesses pests, spreading in the Republic, which are not enlisted as quarantine pests and takes a decision on the classification of the pests being assessed; - conducts inspection surveys of under-quarantine materials; - defines quarantine phytosanitary status of the territory of the Republic of Tajikistan; - insures decontamination of regulated articles; - informs the authorized state body for plant quarantine of the exporting country in case when quarantine pests are detected at the time of inspection of the imported consignment. (...) Measures on detecting quarantine pests and their control, localisation, elimination of their focuses of infestation are implemented at the expenses of owners and users of under-quarantine materials.
Language:English
Score: 1320835.6 - https://www.wto.org/english/th...e/tjk_e/WTACCTJK15A3_LEG_1.pdf
Data Source: un
Effectiveness of the pesticide may be either “control” or “reduction” of the pest. Where other pest management methods are applied simultaneously with the pesticide, such as in IPM, reduction or suppression of the development of a target pest/disease/weed may be acceptable effectiveness. In such cases ”control” of the pest should not be claimed by the applicant. (...) Alternatives can be other registered chemical or biological pesticides, or they may be other pest control measures (e.g. biological control, agronomic interventions).
Language:English
Score: 1318774.9 - https://www.fao.org/pesticide-...s/decision-making/elements/en/
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