Home

Results 1 - 10 of 60,447 for accidents. Search took 5.095 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
• Need to encourage better data provision • 7 accidents (13%) could not be classified due to insufficient data 7 When sufficient data does not exist LOC-I Accidents vs. Fatal Accidents • All LOC-I accidents occurring in 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2017, 2019 and HY2021 were fatal accidents • There were zero LOC-I accidents in 2020 • In the first half year 2021, there were three fatal LOC-I accidents 8 LOC-I Fatal Accidents & Fatalities 9 LOC-I Fatality Risk Accident Data: 2011-HY2021 10 LOC-I by Flight Regime Accident Data: 2011-HY2021 • Fatalities were identified in LOC-I accidents that occurred at the initial climb, approach, cruise, takeoff, go- around, landing, descent and en route climb • Initial Climb incurred the highest fatal accidents and fatalities • 9 LOC-I fatal accidents involved IATA members and 12 involved IOSA carriers • 32 LOC-I fatal accidents involved passenger flights and 16 cargo flights 11 LOC-I Accidents 12 • 22 of LOC-I accidents involved jet flights • 20 accidents were fatal, resulting in 1,447 fatalities • 7 of which were IATA members and 10 IOSA carriers • 4 of which were cargo flights and 18 Passenger flights • 31 of LOC-I accidents involved turboprop fleet • 29 accidents were fatal, resulting in 411 fatalities • 3 of which were IATA members and 4 IOSA carriers • 12 of which were cargo flights and 18 Passenger flights LOC-I Accidents – Operators based in Africa 13 • 23% (12) of LOC-I accidents involved AFI Operators • All 12 accidents were fatal, resulting in 411 fatalities • Looking at the phase of flight, initial climb had the highest accident with 50% (6) of the accidents, resulting in 226 fatalities • 1 of which was an IATA member and 1 an IOSA carrier • 5 of which were cargo flights and 6 Passenger flights Note: 3 accidents could not be classified due to insufficient information LOC-I Accidents – Operators based in Africa 14 • 17% (2) of LOC-I accidents involved jet passenger flights • The two accidents were fatal, resulting in 310 fatalities • 83% (10) of LOC-I accidents involved turboprop fleet • All 10 accidents were fatal, resulting in 101 fatalities • They were neither IATA members nor IOSA Carriers • 5 of which were cargo flights and 4 Passenger flights Threat and Error Management (TEM) T E M 15 THREAT Prevention Threat Error UAS Prevention Definition - Threats There are two types of threats: • Environmental Threats – (e.g., methodology, lack of visual reference, birds and foreign objects, etc…) • Airline Threats – such as aircraft malfunction, flight controls, MEL Items, etc…) 16 An event or error that occurs outside the influence of the flight crew, but which requires crew attention and management if safety margins are to be maintained. Mismanaged threat: A threat that is linked to or induces a flight crew error. LOC-I Threats Accident Data: 2011-HY2021 The top contributing factors under this category: • Methodology (43% of total LOC-I accidents) • Icing Conditions (15% of total LOC-I accidents) • Poor visibility / IMC (15% of total LOC-I accidents) • Aircraft Malfunction (39% of total LOC-I accidents) • Contained Engine Failure (include overheat and prop fail (24% of total LOC-I accidents) • Operation Pressure (13% of total LOC-I accidents) • Maintenance Events (13% of total LOC-I accidents) 17 44% 22% 22% 22% Threats related to AFI Operators Definition - Flight Crew Errors 18 An observed flight crew deviation from organizational expectations or crew intentions.
Language:English
Score: 792530 - https://www.icao.int/ESAF/Docu...orkshop%20Nov11_2021_Final.pdf
Data Source: un
Brazil is no exception in this regard. 2.2 Additionally, accident reports produced by the Brazilian Air Accident Investigation Authority have begun to be used in criminal proceedings throughout the country, entirely undermining the just culture principles that are essential to the air accident investigation process. (...) Second, there was recognition that the principles animating a just culture environment had to be maintained so that accident investigators could determine the causes of accidents, in turn avoiding the occurrence of future similar accidents. (...) CONCLUSION 6.1 Despite the fact that Annex 13 provides that the sole purpose of an air accident investigation is to prevent future accidents and not apportion blame or liability, there is a current global trend to utilize information obtained through the air accident investigation as a basis for prosecuting aviation professionals involved in the accident for honest mistakes.
Language:English
Score: 789892.2 - https://www.icao.int/about-ica...AO-Model-Council_WP_Brazil.pdf
Data Source: un
PowerPoint Presentation Loss of Control Inflight Accident Analysis 2 Global Aviation Accident Analysis Global Aviation Accident Data 2010 – 2014  A total of:  415 accidents reported during this period:  409 accidents have been assigned an accident category  88 Fatal Accidents  86 accidents have been assigned an accident category  2,541 fatalities 3 Frequency of Total Accidents 4 94 92 75 81 73 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 20 10 20 11 20 12 20 13 20 14 N um be r o f A cc id en ts Global Accidents per Year Source: IATA GADM Percentage of Total Accidents by Region 5 14% 18% 8% 18% 12% 8% 19% 3% 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14% 16% 18% 20% 22% 24% AF I AS PA C CI S EU R LA TA M M EN A N AM N AS IA Pe rc en ta ge o f A cc id en ts Percentage of Total Accidents by Region Source: IATA GADM Frequency of Total Accident by Accident Categories 6 90 72 50 38 34 34 33 26 12 10 9 1 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Ru nw ay / T ax iw ay E xc ur si on G ea r- up L an di ng / G ea r C ol la ps e G ro un d D am ag e Lo ss o f C on tr ol In -fl ig ht Co nt ro lle d Fl ig ht In to T er ra in (C FI T) H ar d La nd in g In -fl ig ht D am ag e Ta ils tr ik e U nd er sh oo t O ff A irp or t L an di ng / D itc hi ng O th er E nd S ta te M id -a ir Co lli si on N um be r o f A cc id en ts Total Accidents by Category Source: IATA GADM Percentage of Global Accident Categories 7 22% 18% 12% 9% 8% 8% 8% 6% 3% 2% 2% 0% 0% 2% 4% 6% 8% 10% 12% 14% 16% 18% 20% 22% 24% Ru nw ay / T ax iw ay E xc ur si on G ea r- up L an di ng / G ea r C ol la ps e G ro un d D am ag e Lo ss o f C on tr ol In -fl ig ht Co nt ro lle d Fl ig ht In to T er ra in (C FI T) H ar d La nd in g In -fl ig ht D am ag e Ta ils tr ik e U nd er sh oo t O ff A irp or t L an di ng / D itc hi ng O th er E nd S ta te M id -a ir Co lli si on Pe rc en ta ge o f A cc id en ts Percentage of Accident Categories Source: IATA GADM 8 IOSA vs. (...) NON-IOSA REGISTRY ACCIDENT RATE All Accident Rate IOSA Registry Accident Rate Non-IOSA Registry Accident Rate Source: IATA GADM 10 Aircraft Propulsion: Jet / Turboprop Hull Loss Fatal Accidents by Categories 11 Accident Frequency and Survivability 12 13 LOC-I Accident Analysis Loss of Control Inflight Accidents 2010 - 2014 There were a total of 415 commercial accidents during this period:  38 of these accidents were LOC-I  37 were fatal accidents  Resulted in 1,242 out of 2,541 fatalities 14 Frequency of LOC-I Accidents per year 15 LOC-I Accident Rates 16 17 18 19 20  Jet aircraft were involved in 13 accidents  Turboprop aircraft were involved in 25 accidents 21 Aircraft Propulsion: Jet vs. (...) Non-IOSA Accidents IOSA vs. Non-IOSA Total Accident Rates Slide Number 10 Fatal Accidents by Categories Accident Frequency and Survivability LOC-I Accident Analysis Loss of Control Inflight Accidents2010 - 2014 Frequency of LOC-I Accidents per year LOC-I Accident Rates Slide Number 17 Slide Number 18 Slide Number 19 Slide Number 20 Aircraft Propulsion: Jet vs.
Language:English
Score: 789440.43 - https://www.icao.int/MID/Docum...Accident%20Analysis%20(JF).pdf
Data Source: un
• Need to encourage better data provision • 8 accidents (24%) could not be classified due to insufficient data 7 When sufficient data does not exist CFIT Accidents vs. Fatal Accidents • All CFIT accidents occurring in 2012, 2013, 2015, 2017, 2018, and 2020 were fatal accidents • The CFIT accidents in 2016 and 2019 were non-fatal accidents • There were zero CFIT accidents reported in the first half of 2021 8 CFIT Fatal Accidents & Fatalities 9 CFIT Fatality Risk Accident Data: 2011-HY2021 10 CFIT by Flight Regime Accident Data: 2011-HY2021 • Fatalities were identified in CFIT accidents that occurred on approach, cruise, initial climb, go-around, descent and landing • 5 non-fatal CFIT accidents occurred, 4 of which were on approach and one on landing • Approach incurred the highest number of fatal accidents and fatalities • Of the 28 CFIT fatal accidents, 3 involved IATA members and 4 involved IOSA carriers • 15 CFIT fatal accidents involved passenger flights and 13 cargo flights 11 CFIT Accidents by Aircraft Propulsion 12 • 7 of the 33 CFIT accidents involved jet flights • All 7 were fatal accidents, resulting in 96 fatalities • 1 of which was IATA member and 2 IOSA carriers • 3 of which were cargo flights and 4 Passenger flights • 26 of the 33 CFIT accidents involved turboprop fleet • 21 accidents were fatal, resulting in 351 fatalities • 2 of which were IATA members and 3 IOSA carriers • 12 of which were cargo flights and 13 Passenger flights CFIT Accidents – Operators Based in Africa 13 • 15% (5) of CFIT accidents involved AFI Operators • 4 accidents were fatal, resulting in 17 fatalities • All 5 were operated on turboprop cargo flights • Looking at the phase of flight, approach incurred the highest accident with a total of 4 accidents (80%). 3 of which were fatal accidents, resulting in 15 fatalities CFIT Turboprop Accidents – AFI Operators 14 • 100% (5) of CFIT accidents involved turboprop fleet • They were neither IATA members nor IOSA Carriers • All 5 of were cargo flights 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1.66 1.63 1.66 1.64 3.26 0.00 0.50 1.00 1.50 2.00 2.50 3.00 3.50 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 HY2021 A c c id e n t ra te p e r m ill io n s e c to rs # o f a c c id e n ts Turboprop CFIT Accidents Number Of Accidents Accident Rate Threat and Error Management (TEM) T E M 15 THREAT Prevention Threat Error UAS Prevention Definition - Threats There are two types of threats: • Environmental Threats – (e.g., methodology, lack of visual reference, birds and foreign objects, etc…) • Airline Threats – such as aircraft malfunction, flight controls, MEL Items, etc…) 16 An event or error that occurs outside the influence of the flight crew, but which requires crew attention and management if safety margins are to be maintained. Mismanaged threat: A threat that is linked to or induces a flight crew error. CFIT Threats Accident Data: 2011-HY2021 The top contributing factors under this category: • Methodology (60% of total CFIT accidents) • Poor visibility / IMC (52% of total CFIT accidents) • Wind/Windshear/Gusty wind (12% of total CFIT accidents) • Thunderstorms (8% of total CFIT accidents) • Air Traffic Services (28% of total CFIT accidents) 17 67% 33% 33% 33% Threats related to AFI Operators CFIT Threats Accident Data: 2011-HY2021 The top contributing factors under this category: • Terrain / Obstacles (28% of total CFIT accidents) • Navigational Aids (60% of total CFIT accidents) • Ground navigation aid malfunction (60% of total CFIT accidents) 18 100% 100% 33% Threats related to AFI Operators Definition - Flight Crew Errors 19 An observed flight crew deviation from organizational expectations or crew intentions.
Language:English
Score: 786192.4 - https://www.icao.int/WACAF/Doc...CFIT%20Accident%20Analysis.pdf
Data Source: un
Manual on Assistance to Aircraft Accident Victims and their Families (Doc 9973) provides guidance on the types of family assistance that may be provided to aircraft accident victims and their families. (...) Policy on Assistance to Aircraft Accident Victims and their Families (Doc 9998)   sets out ICAO policies regarding the provision of assistance to aircraft accident victims and their families. (...) It also provides guidelines for accident investigation courses.    Hazards at Aircraft Accident Sites (Cir 315) discusses the nature and variety of occupational hazards and the management of risk associated with exposure to a wide range of health and safety hazards during the investigation of aircraft accidents.
Language:English
Score: 785965.1 - https://www.icao.int/safety/ai...ation/AIG/Pages/Documents.aspx
Data Source: un
Microsoft Word - Assembly Resolution A38-1.docx Assembly Resolution A38‐1: Assistance to victims of aviation accidents and their families  Having considered that, even though international air transport is the safest means of  transportation, the total elimination of serious accidents cannot be guaranteed;   Whereas the actions of the State of Occurrence should address the most critical needs of  persons affected by a civil aviation accident;   Whereas the policy of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) should be to ensure  that the mental, physical, and spiritual well‐being of victims involved in civil aviation accidents and their  families are considered and accommodated by ICAO and its Member States;   Whereas it is essential that ICAO and its Member States recognize the importance of timely  notification of family members of victims involved in civil aviation accidents; the prompt recovery and  accurate identification of victims; the return of the victims’ personal effects; and the dissemination of  accurate information to family members;   Recognizing the role of Governments of nationals, who are victims of civil aviation accidents, in  notifying and assisting families of the victims;   Whereas it is essential that support be provided to family members of victims of civil aviation  accidents, wherever the accident may occur, and any lessons learned from support providers, including  effective procedures and policies, be promptly disseminated to other Member States and ICAO to  improve States’ family support operations;   Considering that harmonization of the regulations for dealing with the needs of victims of civil  aviation accidents and their families is also a humanitarian duty and an optional function of the ICAO  Council contemplated in Article 55 (c) of the Chicago Convention;   Considering that States should provide a homogeneous solution for treatment of victims of civil  aviation accidents and their families;   Recognizing that the air carrier involved in a civil aviation accident is often best situated to assist  families in the immediate aftermath of the accident;   Noting that family members of victims of a civil aviation accident, irrespective of where the  accident occurs or the national origin of the victims, express certain fundamental human needs and  emotions;   Recognizing that public attention will continue to focus on States’ investigative actions, as well  as the human interest aspects of a civil aviation accident;   Recalling the issuance of ICAO Guidance on Assistance to Aircraft Accident Victims and their  Families (Circ 285) in 2001 as well as the inclusion, in 2005, of provisions in Annex 9 to enable  expeditious entry into the State in which an accident occurs for family members of victims of aircraft  accidents; and   Acknowledging the approval by the Council of the ICAO Policy on Assistance to Aircraft Accident  Victims and their Families (Doc 9998) in March 2013;       The Assembly:   1.   Calls on Member States to reaffirm their commitment to support victims of civil aviation  accidents and their family members;   2.   Urges Member States to establish legislation, regulations and/or policies to support victims of  civil aviation accidents and their family members, in consideration of the ICAO Policy in Doc 9998;   3.   Encourages States that have legislation, regulations and/or policies to support civil aviation  accident victims and their families to review these documents, as necessary, in consideration of the  ICAO Policy in Doc 9998;   4.  
Language:English
Score: 785041.6 - https://www.icao.int/Meetings/...embly%20Resolution%20A38-1.pdf
Data Source: un
Information regarding the progress of the accident investigation should also be provided to accident victims and their families in a timely manner. (...) Aircraft accident investigation authority 2.14 The Council emphasizes that the sole objective of an aircraft accident investigation, as defined in Annex 13 — Aircraft Accident and Incident Investigation, is the prevention of accidents and incidents, not the apportionment of blame or liability, and is separate from the provision of family assistance. (...) The State in the territory of which an accident or incident occurs. Survivor. A victim who is not fatally injured as a result of the aircraft accident.
Language:English
Score: 783981.9 - https://www.icao.int/Meetings/a38/Documents/DOC9998_en.pdf
Data Source: un
Independence of accident and incident investigation 2.3 ICAO emphasises the importance of an independent accident investigation authority with the introduction of a new Standard 3.2 in Amendment 15 to Annex 13 as follows: “A State shall establish an accident investigation authority that is independent from State aviation authorities and other entities that could interfere with the conduct or objectivity of an investigation.” (...) With the standard now becoming applicable in November 2016, States that have not yet established an independent accident investigation authority will have to do so as soon as possible. 2.7 In this regard, it has to be noted that ICAO will not regard an accident investigation unit that is within the State civil aviation authority as an independent accident investigation authority. (...) This provides States with more flexibility to designate the authority that will perform a balancing test for purposes other than accident or incident investigation. 2.10 Standard 5.12 includes a list of accident and incident investigation records that are to be subjected to the balancing test.
Language:English
Score: 783490.3 - https://www.icao.int/APAC/Meet...ent%2015%20to%20Annex%2013.pdf
Data Source: un
Safety investigation of accidents and incidents is in support of the management of safety in the State’s operation of the SSP and is based on the following principles:  Objective of investigation: The sole objective of investigation is the prevention of accidents and incidents. Investigation is not for the purpose of apportioning blame or liability.  Independence of investigation: The State has established an independent accident and incident investigation process and maintains the independence of the accident and incident investigation authority from other State aviation organizations.  Systemic approach: Accidents and incidents reflect deficiencies in the system as a whole, rather than being due solely to the actions of individuals. (...) Membership of the APAC-AIG will come from accident investigating organizations in the Asia and Pacific Regions.
Language:English
Score: 783260.3 - https://www.icao.int/APAC/RASG...s/ToR%20-%20APAC%20AIG.pdf.pdf
Data Source: un
AIA WG/1-WP/2 16/3/2016 International Civil Aviation Organization Accident and Incident Analysis Working Group First Meeting (AIA WG/1) (Cairo, Egypt, 29 - 31 March 2016) Agenda Item 2: AIA WG Work Programme AIA WG WORK ARRANGEMENT (Presented by the Secretariat) SUMMARY The RASG-MID/4 meeting established the AIA WG to review, analyse and categorize on annual basis the accidents and incidents at the regional level and provide an agreed and harmonized regional dataset of accidents and incidents. (...) The objective is to provide an agreed dataset of accidents and serious incidents on an annual basis. (...) In addition, some accidents and incidents are classified as “Unknown”. 2.2 ICAO iSTARS (ADREP et al.) application contains an aggregation of different accident and incident data sources including ADREP, Aviation Safety Network and Aviation Herald.
Language:English
Score: 782070.17 - https://www.icao.int/MID/Documents/2016/AIA%20WG1/WP2.pdf
Data Source: un