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In vitro nucleic acid techniques enable the introduction of DNA that can result in the synthesis of new substances in plants. The new substances can be conventional components of plant foods such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins which are novel in the context of that recombinant-DNA plant. (...) Assessment of possible allergenicity (proteins) 41. When the protein(s) resulting from the inserted gene is present in the food, it should be assessed for potential allergenicity in all cases. (...) This information may suggest whether that protein has an allergenic potential. Sequence homology searches comparing the structure of all newly expressed proteins with all known allergens should be done.
Language:English
Score: 1829202.3 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...d/gmfp/docs/CAC.GL_45_2003.pdf
Data Source: un
In vitro nucleic acid techniques enable the introduction of DNA that can result in the synthesis of new substances in plants. The new substances can be conventional components of plant foods such as proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins which are novel in the context of that recombinant-DNA plant. (...) Assessment of possible allergenicity (proteins) 41. When the protein(s) resulting from the inserted gene is present in the food, it should be assessed for potential allergenicity in all cases. (...) This information may suggest whether that protein has an allergenic potential. Sequence homology searches comparing the structure of all newly expressed proteins with all known allergens should be done.
Language:English
Score: 1829202.3 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...ad/gmfp/resources/CXG_045e.pdf
Data Source: un
In addition, quinoa is notable as a good source of quality protein, dietary fibre, polyunsaturated fats and minerals. While quinoa is a good source of many nutrients, it is important to consume it as a part of a balanced meal with many other food types to obtain good overall nutrition. Protein Quinoa’s protein quantity depends on the variety, with a protein range of 10.4 to 17.0 percent of its edible portion. 3 While generally higher in protein quantity than most grains, quinoa is known more for its protein quality. 4   Protein is made up of amino acids, of which eight are considered essential for both children and adults. (...) A lack of iron is often one of the most common nutrition deficiencies. However quinoa, like all plant foods, does contain certain non-nutritive components that can reduce its mineral content and absorption.
Language:English
Score: 1704254.9 - https://www.fao.org/quinoa-201...s-quinoa/nutritional-value/en/
Data Source: un
The emissions intensity is expressed in kilograms of “carbon dioxide equivalents” – which includes not only CO2 but all greenhouse gases – per kilogram of food, per gram of protein or per calorie. (...) Here’s a chart showing the climate impact of protein-rich foods, which account for the bulk of our dietary emissions:   Greenhouse gas emissions intensity of protein-rich foods (kilo of carbon dioxide equivalent per 100 grams of protein)   Source: Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change. (...) For consumers, a shift towards plant-rich diets can make a big difference. Where appropriate, shifting to diets with more plant protein (such as beans, chickpeas, lentils, nuts, and grains), a reduced amount of animal-based foods (meat and dairy) and less saturated fats (butter, milk, cheese, meat, coconut oil and palm oil) can lead to a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions compared to current dietary patterns in most industrialized countries.
Language:English
Score: 1700596.5 - https://www.un.org/en/climatec...ge/science/climate-issues/food
Data Source: un
The emissions intensity is expressed in kilograms of “carbon dioxide equivalents” – which includes not only CO2 but all greenhouse gases – per kilogram of food, per gram of protein or per calorie. (...) Here’s a chart showing the climate impact of protein-rich foods, which account for the bulk of our dietary emissions:   Greenhouse gas emissions intensity of protein-rich foods (kilo of carbon dioxide equivalent per 100 grams of protein)   Source: Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change. (...) For consumers, a shift towards plant-rich diets can make a big difference. Where appropriate, shifting to diets with more plant protein (such as beans, chickpeas, lentils, nuts, and grains), a reduced amount of animal-based foods (meat and dairy) and less saturated fats (butter, milk, cheese, meat, coconut oil and palm oil) can lead to a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions compared to current dietary patterns in most industrialized countries.
Language:English
Score: 1700596.5 - https://www.un.org/en/node/177591
Data Source: un
The capture and culture of marine and freshwater fish contribute a significant amount of animal protein to the diets of people worldwide. It is estimated that between 15 and 20 percent of all animal proteins come from aquatic animals. (...) All over the world, in both developing and developed countries, there is an ever increasing interest in medicinal and aromatic plants regarding their use, development, cultivation, conservation, sustainable use, etc. Today, plant-derived medicines are the basis for medical treatment in many countries.
Language:English
Score: 1686197.7 - https://www.fao.org/ecosystem-...ound/provisioning-services/ru/
Data Source: un
The capture and culture of marine and freshwater fish contribute a significant amount of animal protein to the diets of people worldwide. It is estimated that between 15 and 20 percent of all animal proteins come from aquatic animals. (...) All over the world, in both developing and developed countries, there is an ever increasing interest in medicinal and aromatic plants regarding their use, development, cultivation, conservation, sustainable use, etc. Today, plant-derived medicines are the basis for medical treatment in many countries.
Language:English
Score: 1686197.7 - https://www.fao.org/ecosystem-...ound/provisioning-services/ar/
Data Source: un
The capture and culture of marine and freshwater fish contribute a significant amount of animal protein to the diets of people worldwide. It is estimated that between 15 and 20 percent of all animal proteins come from aquatic animals. (...) All over the world, in both developing and developed countries, there is an ever increasing interest in medicinal and aromatic plants regarding their use, development, cultivation, conservation, sustainable use, etc. Today, plant-derived medicines are the basis for medical treatment in many countries.
Language:English
Score: 1686197.7 - https://www.fao.org/ecosystem-...ound/provisioning-services/en/
Data Source: un
The capture and culture of marine and freshwater fish contribute a significant amount of animal protein to the diets of people worldwide. It is estimated that between 15 and 20 percent of all animal proteins come from aquatic animals. (...) All over the world, in both developing and developed countries, there is an ever increasing interest in medicinal and aromatic plants regarding their use, development, cultivation, conservation, sustainable use, etc. Today, plant-derived medicines are the basis for medical treatment in many countries.
Language:English
Score: 1686197.7 - https://www.fao.org/ecosystem-...ound/provisioning-services/zh/
Data Source: un
Alternative proteins are among the most promising. What are alternative proteins and why are they such a big deal? Alternative proteins include microbial proteins (microalgae and mycoproteins), insect-based proteins, so-called cell-based meat, plant-based meat substitutes, and dairy alternatives. (...) Producers and consumers are already taking note. Plant-based meat substitutes can now be found in fast food restaurants around the world, animal cell-based meat is being tested with consumers in a number of countries ranging from Singapore to Israel, and insect protein bars are on supermarket shelves in the European Union and other regions.
Language:English
Score: 1672879.7 - https://www.fao.org/in-action/...ces/news/details/en/c/1459357/
Data Source: un