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Who is entitled to submit the arms embargo exemption requests or notifications? (...) III. What type of arms embargo exemptions are currently in force? There are four types of arms embargo exemptions: for the Committee’s consideration; for the development of Security Forces of the Federal Government of Somalia; for the Committee’s information; standing exemptions; 1. Arms embargo exemptions for the Committee’s consideration a) Pursuant to paragraph 10 of resolution 2551 (2020), deliveries  of items  in Annex A to the same resolution intended solely for the development of the Somali National Security Forces, or Somali security sector institutions other than those of the FGS, to provide security for the Somali people, require an advance approval by the Committee on a case by -case basis, submitted at least five working days in advance by the FGS or the State or international, regional or subregional organisation delivering assistance. .
Language:English
Score: 938218.6 - https://www.un.org/securitycou...ns/751/exemptions/arms-embargo
Data Source: un
Article 41 – Measures not involving the use of armed force Among the most common measures not involving the use of armed force, which the Council has at its disposal to enforce its decisions, are those measures that are known as sanctions. (...) As the United Nations does not have any armed forces at its disposal (for details, see Article 43), the Council uses Article 42 to authorize the use of force by a peacekeeping operation , multinational forces or interventions by regional organizations . (...) Article 43 – Member States’ obligation to offer assistance in the maintenance of international peace and security The obligation for United Nations members to undertake to make armed forces available to the Security Council, render assistance and accord relief as necessary for the maintenance of international peace and security exists only in accordance with one or more special agreements.
Language:English
Score: 915402 - https://www.un.org/securitycou...cil/content/repertoire/actions
Data Source: un
What kind of measures involving the use of armed force has the Security Council imposed in the past? (...) Article 41 of the Charter of the United Nations gives the Security Council the authority to impose measures not involving the use of armed force. For more information on sanctions measures, visit the sanctions committees website . (...) What kind of measures involving the use of armed force has the Security Council imposed in the past?
Language:English
Score: 913126.9 - https://www.un.org/securitycouncil/content/faq
Data Source: un
Article 44 When the Security Council has decided to use force it shall, before calling upon a Member not represented on it to provide armed forces in fulfilment of the obligations assumed under Article 43, invite that Member, if the Member so desires, to participate in the decisions of the Security Council concerning the employment of contingents of that Member's armed forces. (...) Article 46 Plans for the application of armed force shall be made by the Security Council with the assistance of the Military Staff Committee. (...) The Military Staff Committee shall be responsible under the Security Council for the strategic direction of any armed forces placed at the disposal of the Security Council.
Language:English
Score: 908736.3 - https://www.un.org/en/about-us/un-charter/chapter-7
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Programme Children recruited by armed forces or armed groups Thousands of boys and girls are used as soldiers, cooks, spies and more in armed conflicts around the world. (...) Children become part of an armed force or group for various reasons. Some are abducted, threatened, coerced or manipulated by armed actors. (...) The recruitment and use of children by armed forces or armed groups is a grave violation of child rights and international humanitarian law.
Language:English
Score: 902004 - https://www.unicef.org/protect...dren-recruited-by-armed-forces
Data Source: un
INTRODUCTION 1.0 Hundreds of thousands of children are associated with armed forces and armed groups in conflicts around the world. (...) It does not only refer to a child who is taking or has taken a direct part in hostilities. 2.2 “Armed forces” refers to the armed forces of a State. 2.3 “Armed groups” refers to groups distinct from armed forces as defined by Article 4 of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict. 2.4 “Recruitment” refers to compulsory, forced and voluntary conscription or enlistment of children into any kind of armed force or armed group. 2.5 “Unlawful recruitment or use” is recruitment or use of children under the age stipulated in the international treaties applicable to the armed force or armed group in question or under applicable national law. 2.6 “Release” Includes the process of formal and controlled disarmament and demobilisation of children from an armed force or armed group as well as the informal ways in which children leave by escaping, being captured or by any other means. (...) Efforts should always be taken to involve the community in planning for programming to ensure that it is adequately supported to care for children released from armed forces or armed groups and to prevent association with armed forces or armed groups from taking place.
Language:English
Score: 897140.1 - https://www.unicef.org/mali/me.../1561/file/ParisPrinciples.pdf
Data Source: un
An entire chapter of this code of ethics for all the armed forces is devoted to ethics in operations. (...) Title IV describes education in the armed forces, which is organized as follows: • Basic military training • Advanced military training • Higher studies in national defence 1.1 Basic training for all members of the armed forces The purpose of basic training is to prepare career members of the armed forces to join the ranks and to train soldiers and sailors for entry into the auxiliary or professional forces. (...) It is highly significant that the Royal Ordinances for the Armed Forces give precedence to international humanitarian law.
Language:English
Score: 891343.3 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/sixth...eva_StatesComments/Spain_E.pdf
Data Source: un
He is particularly worried about the whereabouts and safety of President Roch Marc Christian Kaboré, as well as the worsening security situation, following the coup carried out on January 23rd by sections of the armed forces.  The Secretary-General strongly condemns any attempt to take over a government by the force of arms. He calls on the coup leaders to lay down their arms and to ensure the protection of the physical integrity of the President and of the institutions of Burkina Faso. (...) Il est préoccupé, en particulier, par le sort et la sécurité du Président Roch Marc Christian Kaboré, ainsi que par la détérioration de la situation sécuritaire, à la suite du coup d’état qui a été déclenché le 23 janvier par des éléments des forces armées.     Le Secrétaire général condamne fermement toute tentative visant à renverser un gouvernement par les armes.
Language:English
Score: 890211.8 - https://www.un.org/sg/en/node/261559
Data Source: un
On 29 January 2009, the Qatari Armed Forces formed a committee on international humanitarian law. (...) The Department of Legal Affairs of the Armed Forces General Staff has issued a publication entitled “Overview of the Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC),” which addresses major topics in LOAC that Armed Forces members need to be aware of and understand. (...) The Qatari Armed Forces is in the process of incorporating material on the rights of the child into the curricula of the Military College and the Armed Forces Academy.
Language:English
Score: 888837.8 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/sixth...eva_StatesComments/Qatar_E.pdf
Data Source: un
In some countries, paramilitary forces are included in a nation’s armed forces. Importantly, states, and by extension their armed forces are responsible for adhering to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and its optional protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict. (...) If a child is recruited by force by an armed force or group, this is considered as two violations – abduction and recruitment. 6 Denial of humanitarian access for children. (...) Armed forces and non-State armed actors should make formal and specific commitments to prevent and address conflict-related sexual violence. 4 Ensure humanitarian access for children.
Language:English
Score: 888739.6 - https://www.unicef.org/media/9...le/MRM-Advocacy-Brief-2021.pdf
Data Source: un