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The right to life enshrined in Article 6 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) is inherently linked to the international community’s human rights concern with small arms and light weapons (SALW)1. Therefore, the broad scope of right to life under the ICCPR serves as the basis for other international standards regarding the excessive use of force caused by firearms, e.g. (...) Brazilian and Mozambique NGOs questioned the timing of this donation, mentioning the lack of any clarification about the use of the military aircraft by Mozambican Armed Forces, unlike the practice adopted by Brazil in previous donations of military hardware. (...) Therefore, it’s impossible to verify whether the restriction of arms transfers mentioned above is still in force. 8 The arms transfers policy in Brazil is known as PNEMEM – National Export Policy for Military Equipment, which was established during the military dictatorship (1964-1985).
Language:English
Score: 1002751 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...rs/ConectasDireitosHumanos.pdf
Data Source: un
The series is focusing on recurring nightmares as a common reaction in children associated with armed forces and armed groups (CAAFAG) and its devastating effects. (...) “For children used by armed forces and armed groups to be able to rebuild their lives and create a future for themselves, they must be given adequate psychosocial support and treatment when needed.” (...) She was only 10 years old when she was forced into an armed group. She used to have nightmares several times per week after she was released.  
Language:English
Score: 1002534.9 - https://www.unicef.org/southsu...htmares-have-once-been-reality
Data Source: un
Thirty-two (32) children and young people released by the Myanmar Armed Forces Skip to main content Myanmar Toggle navigation English Global Links Visit UNICEF Global High contrast Myanmar EXPLORE UNICEF About us Children in Myanmar Where we work Our Representative Our partners Work with us Contact us Press Centre Donate Main navigation What we do Research and reports Stories Take action Search area has closed. (...) Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Press release Thirty-two (32) children and young people released by the Myanmar Armed Forces 31 March 2019 UNICEF Myanmar/2019/Kaung Htet Yangon, 31 March 2019  – Today, the Government of Myanmar released seven children and 25 young people who were recruited under the age of 18 by the Armed Forces (also known as ‘Tatmadaw’). (...) The six Grave Violations that are monitored and reported are: killing or maiming of children recruitment and use of children in armed forces and armed groups attacks against schools or hospitals rape or other grave sexual violence abduction of children denial of humanitarian access for children The CTFMR is also mandated to provide a coordinated response to such grave violations.
Language:English
Score: 1002483.2 - https://www.unicef.org/myanmar...-released-myanmar-armed-forces
Data Source: un
In respect of persons serving in the Armed Forces of BiH and their possibility to invoke the conscientious objection, we may say that, although this possibility has not been foreseen by law, in practice, this could be done. The Law on Service in Armed Forces of Bosnia and Herzegovina provides that persons contracting to serve in the Armed Forces of BiH may terminate their contract prior to the date mentioned in the contract. (...) According to our case-law no asylum seeker has ever asked for asylum based on the fear of being prosecuted because of their refusal to serve in the armed forces of their country due to the conscientious objection.
Language:English
Score: 1002059.8 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...ientiousObjection/NHRI-BiH.pdf
Data Source: un
A more correct term is Children Associated with Armed Forces and Armed Groups. These children should be considered primarily as victims of grave child rights violations . Children become part of an armed force or group for various reasons. Some are abducted, threatened, coerced or manipulated by armed actors. (...) No matter their involvement, the recruitment and use Six types of grave violations Children affected by armed conflict must at all times be protected.  Armed forces and armed groups are required by international humanitarian law to take measures to protect civilians, including children, who are particularly vulnerable during times of armed conflict.
Language:English
Score: 1002057.2 - https://www.unicef.org/sudan/s...ut-children-and-armed-conflict
Data Source: un
Their situation – and that of other children who were already displaced – remains extremely worrying, as many have been separated from their families and are at greater risk of child rights violations such as being abducted, threatened or forced to join armed forces and groups. Recruitment and use of children by armed forces and groups remains the most frequent grave child rights’ violation in CAR; accounting for 584 out of a total of 792 cases of confirmed grave violations documented in 2020. (...) These include the reintegration of 2,000 children released from armed forces and groups to their families and communities, as well as the provision of alternative family-based services for unaccompanied or separated children. (...) In June 2020, the government of the Central African Republic adopted a national child protection code, which, for the first time, explicitly prohibits the recruitment and use of children by armed groups and forces, and clearly states that children formerly associated with armed groups should not be treated as adults.
Language:English
Score: 1001162 - https://www.unicef.org/wca/pre...ow-internally-displaced-amidst
Data Source: un
The existing CSBM-regime now constitutes of interlocking exchanges of obligatory and verifiable notifications on military holdings and activities, and armed force levels. The CSBM regime contributes to greater transparency, and thus promotes trust and confidence among participating States. (...) Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe Adopted on 19 November, 1990 The Netherlands is party to the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe (CFE). (...) To this end, the Vienna Document sets out mechanisms for consultation and cooperation and provisions regarding the exchange and verification of information on the signatory states' armed forces, their defense policies and military activities. c.
Language:English
Score: 1000775 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...s-2014-Information-on-CBMs.pdf
Data Source: un
UNREC and UNDP support Madagascar with training activities in physical security and stockpile management, weapons marking and data recording – UNODA     مرحبا بكم في الأمم المتحدة العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español اللغة العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español UNREC and UNDP support Madagascar with training activities in physical security and stockpile management, weapons marking and data recording يونيو 14th, 2019 UNREC and UNDP Madagascar joined forces, in the framework of UNREC Arms Marking Project and UNDP Security Sector Reform Project in Madagascar, to provide capacity-building to the Malagasy Defense and Security Forces (FDS) on physical security and stockpile management, weapons marking and data record keeping, held from 06 to 18 May 2019 in Vontovorona, Madagascar. The main purpose of this workshop is to contribute to strengthening the physical security, control and management of weapons and ammunition The workshop brought together 100 participants representing different bodies of the National Defense and Security Forces including the Armed Forces, the Police, the Gendarmerie, Customs, the Water and Forest Authorities, Penitentiary authorities and other stakeholders. The main purpose of the workshop was to contribute to strengthening the physical security, control and management of weapons and ammunition in order to effectively combat proliferation and illicit trafficking of SALW, reduce the incidence of armed violence in Madagascar and restore trust between defense and security forces and the population.
Language:English
Score: 1000624.4 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...ns-marking-and-data-recording/
Data Source: un
Lack democratic government institutions for the formulation of national security and defence policies or the monitoring of activities by and expenditure on the armed forces and the public security of the State; 5. (...) Strengthen customs and border controls by increasing and enhancing the capacities of the police, customs department, army and/or other branches of the armed forces, public prosecutor’s office, judicial authorities and other related agencies; A/CONF.192/2006/RC/WP.6 06-41566 4 9. Coordinate training programmes for the police, customs department, army and/or other branches of the armed forces and other agencies involved in preventing, combating and eradicating, investigating and punishing the illicit trade in arms, ammunition, explosives and other related materiel; 10.
Language:English
Score: 1000420.4 - https://www.un.org/events/smallarms2006/pdf/rc.wp.6-e.pdf
Data Source: un
Under the Directive of the General Staff of the Armed Forces No. 653/CEMGA/S- CEM/OPS/DOMP-DIH of 24 August 2010, instruction in international humanitarian law must be provided in all training programmes for the Forces. (...) United Nations Secretariat (Office of Legal Affairs) New York 2007328E Legal advisers are deployed to the Chief of General Staff of the Armed Forces and the operational chiefs, and military police officers are integrated into combat units as part of the introduction of judicial procedures in the theatres of operations. (...) With regard to point 2.2, on assistance and protection, there are designated gender-based violence focal points at several levels within the Forces; ICRC has access at all times to detainees; and children associated with armed forces or armed groups are offered special protection in accordance with the 2013 protocol between the Government and the United Nations system.
Language:English
Score: 1000033.4 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/sixth/75/protocols/mali_e.pdf
Data Source: un