Home

Results 71 - 80 of 547,789 for armed forces. Search took 14.279 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
On 24 October 2014, clashes between militant groups and the national armed forces in the northern city of Tripoli resulted in four fatalities and dozens of injuries. (...) Security personnel, including members of the national armed forces and internal security forces, who were kidnapped and taken hostage in August 2014 during an incursion of armed men belonging to the Nusra Front and ISIL, have still not been released. (...) I have consistently highlighted the National Dialogue as the best way to deal with the issue of arms and achieve the ultimate goal of no weapons or armed forces in Lebanon other than those of the Lebanese State.
Language:English
Score: 854998 - https://www.un.org/unispal/document/auto-insert-181582/
Data Source: un
Despite progress, boys and girls continue to be recruited, kidnapped, forced to fight or work for military groups or armed forces. (...) The International Day was initiated in 2002 when the  Optional Protocol  to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict entered into force on February 12, 2002. This protocol, which sets the minimum age for recruitment into armed forces in conflict at 18, has been ratified by 167 States.
Language:English
Score: 854975.8 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2018/02/1002501
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Press release Children, not soldiers 14 May 2014 الخبر بالعربية Yemen signs action plan to end recruitment and use of children by armed forces SANA’A, Yemen, 14 May 2014 – In a landmark development for the protection of children, today, the Government of Yemen signed an action plan with the United Nations to end and prevent the recruitment of children by the Yemeni Armed Forces. (...) This Action Plan aims to ensure the release of all children within armed forces in Yemen and their effective reintegration into communities," said Julien Harneis, UNICEF's Representative in Yemen. (...) The Yemeni Government Forces were first included on the list of the Secretary-General in its 2012 annual report on children and armed conflict.
Language:English
Score: 854133.9 - https://www.unicef.org/mena/pr...es/children-not-soldiers-yemen
Data Source: un
The Czech Republic is party to the following international Treaties and Conventions in the field of conventional arms control, disarmament, confidence and security building measures and export control regimes: - Anti-Personnel Landmine Convention - Convention on Cluster Munitions - Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons - United Nations Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects and the Implementation of the International Instrument to Enable States to Identify and Trace in a Timely and Reliable Manner, Illicit Small Arms and Light Weapons - Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe - Vienna Document - Open Skies Treaty - The Wassenaar Arrangement on Export Controls for Conventional Arms and Dual Use Goods and Technologies. (...) The Convention as well as the Law entered into force for the Czech Republic on 1 March 2012. The Czech Republic in 2013 implemented all commitments stemming from international agreements on arms control, disarmament and confidence- and security-building measures in Europe. (...) As for Conventional Forces in Europe Treaty, it finds itself at the crossroads.
Language:English
Score: 854004.3 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...018/10/Czech-Republic-2014.pdf
Data Source: un
Middle East situation/Cessation of hostilities in Lebanon/Peace process - SecCo resolution - Question of Palestine Skip to content Welcome to the United Nations عربي 中文 English Français Русский Español Search for: Home About The Committee on Palestinian Rights Division for Palestinian Rights Key Topics Key issues at stake The Quartet History Fast facts The Committee Background Bureau Membership Mandate and Objectives Areas of Activities Working Group Reports Statements Newsletters Events Upcoming Events Committee Meetings International Conferences and Side Events Delegation visits Solidarity Day Capacity Building Programme UNISPAL About UNISPAL Search Document Collection Map Collection Civil Society Overview Responsibilities of Civil Society Partners NGO Action News Get accredited Benefits of accreditation Civil Society Partners UN System FAQ Search for: Home / Middle East situation/Cessation of hostilities in Lebanon/Peace process – SecCo resolution Middle East situation/Cessation of hostilities in Lebanon/Peace process – SecCo resolution     Resolution 1701 (2006)        Adopted by the Security Council at its 5511th meeting, on 11 August 2006       The Security Council ,   Recalling all its previous resolutions on Lebanon, in particular resolutions 425 (1978), 426 (1978), 520 (1982), 1559 (2004), 1655 (2006) 1680 (2006) and 1697 (2006), as well as the statements of its President on the situation in Lebanon, in particular the statements of 18 June 2000 (S/PRST/2000/21), of 19 October 2004 (S/PRST/2004/36), of 4 May 2005 (S/PRST/2005/17), of 23 January 2006 (S/PRST/2006/3) and of 30 July 2006 (S/PRST/2006/35),   Expressing its utmost concern at the continuing escalation of hostilities in Lebanon and in Israel since Hizbollah’s attack on Israel on 12 July 2006, which has already caused hundreds of deaths and injuries on both sides, extensive damage to civilian infrastructure and hundreds of thousands of internally displaced persons,   Emphasizing the need for an end of violence, but at the same time emphasizing  the need to address urgently the causes that have given rise to the current crisis, including by the unconditional release of the abducted Israeli soldiers,   Mindful  of the sensitivity of the issue of prisoners and encouraging  the efforts aimed at urgently settling the issue of the Lebanese prisoners detained in Israel,   Welcoming the efforts of the Lebanese Prime Minister and the commitment of the Government of Lebanon, in its seven-point plan, to extend its authority over its territory, through its own legitimate armed forces, such that there will be no weapons without the consent of the Government of Lebanon and no authority other than that of the Government of Lebanon, welcoming also  its commitment to a United Nations force that is supplemented and enhanced in numbers, equipment, mandate and scope of operation, and bearing in mind  its request in this plan for an immediate withdrawal of the Israeli forces from southern Lebanon,   Determined to act for this withdrawal to happen at the earliest,   Taking due note  of the proposals made in the seven-point plan regarding the Shebaa farms area,   Welcoming the unanimous decision by the Government of Lebanon on 7 August 2006 to deploy a Lebanese armed force of 15,000 troops in South Lebanon as the Israeli army withdraws behind the Blue Line and to request the assistance of additional forces from the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) as needed, to facilitate the entry of the Lebanese armed forces into the region and to restate its intention to strengthen the Lebanese armed forces with material as needed to enable it to perform its duties,   Aware  of its responsibilities to help secure a permanent ceasefire and a long-term solution to the conflict,   Determining that the situation in Lebanon constitutes a threat to international peace and security,  1.     (...) Upon full cessation of hostilities, calls upon  the Government of Lebanon and UNIFIL as authorized by paragraph 11 to deploy their forces together throughout the South and calls upon  the Government of Israel, as that deployment begins, to withdraw all of its forces from southern Lebanon in parallel;  3.     (...) Decides  , in order to supplement and enhance the force in numbers, equipment, mandate and scope of operations, to authorize an increase in the force strength of UNIFIL to a maximum of 15,000 troops, and that the force shall, in addition to carrying out its mandate under resolutions 425 and 426 (1978):  (a)   Monitor the cessation of hostilities;  (b)   Accompany and support the Lebanese armed forces as they deploy throughout the South, including along the Blue Line, as Israel withdraws its armed forces from Lebanon as provided in paragraph 2;  (c)   Coordinate its activities related to paragraph 11 (b) with the Government of Lebanon and the Government of Israel;  (d)   Extend its assistance to help ensure humanitarian access to civilian populations and the voluntary and safe return of displaced persons;  (e)   Assist the Lebanese armed forces in taking steps towards the establishment of the area as referred to in paragraph 8;  (f)   Assist the Government of Lebanon, at its request, to implement paragraph 14;  12.   
Language:English
Score: 853927.1 - https://www.un.org/unispal/document/auto-insert-186298/
Data Source: un
Other forms of violence against women committed in armed conflict include murder, sexual slavery, forced pregnancy and forced sterilization. (...) The abuses that women and girls suffer in armed conflicts may take various forms, such as rape, sexual slavery and forced prostitution. (...) The Changing Nature of the Military Traditionally women have not been active in armed forces and are in some countries often denied the right to enlist. 
Language:English
Score: 853216.3 - https://www.un.org/womenwatch/...lowup/session/presskit/fs5.htm
Data Source: un
The Ministry of Defence has drawn up draft instructions on the procedure for the application of international humanitarian law in the armed forces. The draft instructions set out in a concise manner: - Prohibited ways (methods) and means of conducting military operations; - General obligations of commanders (heads) in the observance of the norms of international humanitarian law; - Obligations of the head of the legal service of the armed forces in ensuring the observance of the norms of international humanitarian law; - Obligations of army medical personnel in observance of the norms of international humanitarian law; - Responsibility for violations of the norms of international humanitarian law; - Procedure for studying the norms of international humanitarian law; - Rules for the application of the norms of international humanitarian law relating to identification; - Details on taking into account the norms of international humanitarian law in the organization, supply, conduct and termination of military operations, the treatment of victims of armed conflicts and of enemy medical and religious personnel, the establishment of a truce, actions of troops in occupied territory and so forth. The instructions are intended to confirm the code of conduct for personnel of the armed forces of the Republic of Belarus participating in military operations, which in an abbreviated and concise manner sets forth the rules of international humanitarian law, which every soldier must be aware of and put into practice. (...) On the basis of the Agreement on cooperation in the area of international humanitarian law between the Ministry of Defence of the Republic of Belarus and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) of 19 December 1996 (hereinafter - the Agreement), since 1997 ICRC has been providing the texts of international treaties in the area of international humanitarian law to the armed forces of the Republic of Belarus. In accordance with the Agreement and the annual plans of cooperation in the study and dissemination of international humanitarian law within the armed forces, the following activities have been carried out between the Ministry of Defence and ICRC with the direct participation of representatives of the Kiev regional delegation of ICRC with a view to the study and dissemination of international humanitarian law in the armed forces: - In the cities of Baranavichy, Brest, Vitebsk, Hrodna and Minsk and in the Pechi township, meetings and seminars on international humanitarian law have been organized for various categories of military personnel; - Students at the military academy of the Republic of Belarus and at the Suvorov training school of Minsk have on several occasions taken part in regional competitions on international humanitarian law: Yaroslav Mudry, General Skobelev, Al-Farabim, Polkovodets Suvorov, Senezh, Bogdan Khmelnitsky; - Five officers of the armed forces received training at international courses on the law of armed conflict in the International Institute of Humanitarian Law at San Remo; - Six officers of the armed forces received training at Senezh military courses on international humanitarian law in the training centre for refresher training and upgrading of skills of the Vystrel officer corps (Solnechnogorsk, Russian Federation); - Officers of the Ministry of Defence took part on several occasions in international conferences and round tables organized by ICRC in Minsk, Moscow and Saint Petersburg in order to enhance their knowledge in the area of international humanitarian law and exchange views and experience in this area.
Language:English
Score: 853184.4 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/sixth...63/Addtl_Prot_TEXT/Belarus.pdf
Data Source: un
Legal basis in Mongolia regarding forced labour Constitution of Mongolia Clause 16.4 of Article 16 “…No one shall be unlawfully forced to work.” (...) Recommendations To the State Great Khural: • Article 4.3 of the Law of Armed Forces of Mongolia should be amended, adding a clause to ensure the working conditions and wages of military conscripted servicemen undertaking a non‐military related work, is in line with that of ordinary citizens. (...) To the Ministry of Defense and General Staff of Armed Forces of Mongolia: • Only the President of Mongolia has the power to make changes to regulations on military units and organisations of the Armed Forces of Mongolia, undertaking non‐military related works including household and reconstruction works, by the Article 13.1.8 of the Law on Armed Forces of Mongolia, thus to annul the act #512 of 2010, which was issued by the chief of the General staff of Armed Forces of Mongolia and was out of his jurisdiction. • It is recommended that the Minister and General staff allocate wages of no less than the minimum wage to conscripted servicemen undertaking non‐military works (household, reconstruction) and to ensure that social security is arranged in accordance with the rules. • The President of Mongolia is the Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces of Mongolia.
Language:English
Score: 853124.9 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...s/presentation/wcms_346424.pdf
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Article “They told me to stop crying or they would kill me” For many teenage girls in South Sudan, escaping from armed groups isn’t the end of their ordeal. Kate Holt UNICEF/UN0272658/Holt Available in: English Français العربية 中文 11 February 2019 YAMBIO, South Sudan – When three armed men forced Mary* and her sister off a narrow road in South Sudan, the terrified 12 year-old started sobbing. (...) Mary’s experience is not unusual in the world’s newest country, where UNICEF estimates 19,000 children have been used by armed forces and armed groups since the conflict started in 2013 Even when children manage to escape their captors or are released, they still have to contend with finding food and shelter – and their loved ones. (...) More complicated than the myth Another common myth is that all children in armed forces and armed groups are kidnapped or forced to join.
Language:English
Score: 853095.6 - https://www.unicef.org/stories...old-me-stop-crying-south-sudan
Data Source: un
Prime Minister [Paolo] Gentiloni [Silveri], I want to acknowledge your leadership in supporting the Armed Forces and Internal Security Forces of Lebanon.  (...) Last December in Paris, this Support Group underscored that the Lebanese Armed Forces are the only legitimate armed force in Lebanon.  (...) To this end, well‑equipped, well‑trained and well‑resourced Lebanese Armed Forces and Internal Security Forces are a prerequisite. 
Language:English
Score: 852683 - https://www.un.org/press/en/2018/sgsm18936.doc.htm
Data Source: un