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RDB represents UNODA in the following fora: Armed Violence Prevention Programme (AVPP), Inter-Agency Task Force on Security Sector Reform, and Standing Committee on Women, Peace and Security. (...) For instance, the curriculum of the Inter-Institutional Training Course (IITC) on combating illicit trafficking of small arms and light weapons includes armed violence prevention as a cross-cutting issue and devotes a specific session to the different impacts of the excessive proliferation and unlawful use of firearms on armed violence in both armed conflict and crime contexts. (...) Cross-cutting issues such as women, peace and security are also included in these trainings destined to armed and security forces, civilian administrators and civil society See www.youtube.com/odaunrec and the webpage of the  African Security Sector Reform Programme (ASSEREP) Developped several codes of conduct for armed and security forces in Africa.
Language:English
Score: 852238.9 - https://www.un.org/disarmament/disarmsec/coop/
Data Source: un
UNICEF welcomes release of seven children associated with armed forces Skip to main content South Sudan Toggle navigation Global Links Visit UNICEF Global High contrast South Sudan EXPLORE UNICEF About us Our partners Our representative Contact us Press centre Donate Main navigation What we do Research and reports Stories Take action Search area has closed. (...) Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Press release UNICEF welcomes release of seven children associated with armed forces Release follows increased awareness on the Comprehensive Action Plan to end all six grave violations against children in South Sudan 18 November 2021 UNICEFSouthSudan/Giri Release of child soldiers in Rumbek. 19 November 2021, Rumbek, South Sudan – At a formal ceremony in Rumbek, yesterday seven children associated with armed forces were released. (...) Participants at the event to release the children in Rumbek included the State Minister of Gender, Child and Social Welfare, national and state-level representatives from the armed forces, officials from the National Disarmament Demobilization and Reintegration Commission, Save the Children, Plan International, UNMISS and UNICEF.
Language:English
Score: 851597.7 - https://www.unicef.org/southsu...leases/unicef-welcomes-release
Data Source: un
The State of Qatar is of the view that these challenges, chief among them being the failure to comply with international humanitarian law, have resulted in destructive acts against civilians, the forced deportation of populations, destruction of infrastructure essential to the livelihood of civilian populations and use of starvation and blockade to achieve military gains on the ground. (...) The State of Qatar is keen to respect and apply the provisions of the aforementioned Conventions and the principles of international humanitarian law in all relevant fields, in implementation whereof: • The Qatari Armed Forces have established a committee on international humanitarian law. The committee includes representatives of all the armed forces and seeks to strengthen implementation of the principles of international humanitarian law and disseminate the culture of international humanitarian law among all its members through its local office and in coordination with dedicated associations and organizations. • In coordination with the International Committee of the Red Crescent (Regional Centre, Kuwait), the Qatari Armed Forces held a course and workshop attended by the relevant military and civilian bodies, within the framework of the endeavour to disseminate the culture of international humanitarian law and relevant conventions. • International humanitarian law is taught as a curriculum subject at Ahmed bin Muhammad Military College within the academic programme. • The military committee on international humanitarian law is developing training programmes and courses to be taught to officers and other ranks in the armed forces training institutes as a compulsory subject. • The Department of Legal Affairs of the Qatari Armed Forces has issued a special publication containing the basic provisions of international humanitarian law to be taught as an academic course.
Language:English
Score: 851325.1 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/sixth/71/protocols/qatar_e.pdf
Data Source: un
Public Statement by Chair of Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict | Meetings Coverage and Press Releases Skip to main content Welcome to the United Nations Meetings Coverage and Press Releases Search the United Nations Search Advanced Search Toggle navigation Home Secretary-General Latest Press Releases Press Conferences General Assembly Latest Meetings Coverage Press Releases Security Council Latest Meetings Coverage Press Releases Press Conferences Economic and Social Council Latest Meetings Coverage Press Releases International Court of Justice United Nations Print Press Release SC/14383 11 December 2020 Secretary-General Statements and Messages Public Statement by Chair of Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict The Security Council Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict, in connection with the examination of the fifth report of the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict in the Philippines (S/2020/777), agreed to convey the following messages through a public statement by the Chair of the Working Group: To all parties to armed conflict in the Philippines Expressing grave concern at and its strongest condemnation of the violations and abuses that continue to be committed against children in the Philippines, and urging all parties to immediately end and prevent all violations involving the recruitment and use of children, killing and maiming, rape and other forms of sexual violence, abduction, attacks on schools and hospitals and denial of humanitarian access and to comply with their obligations under international law; Calling upon all parties to further implement the previous conclusions of the Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict in Philippines; Stressing the importance of accountability for all violations and abuses against children in armed conflict, stressing that all perpetrators must be brought to justice and held accountable without undue delay, including through timely, systematic, impartial and independent investigations, and, as appropriate, prosecution and conviction, through appropriate justice mechanisms, and to ensure that all victims have access to justice and to the medical and support services that they need; Noting with concern that access constraints for the country task force to remote conflict-affected areas, notably the Sulu Archipelago, during the reporting period presented challenges to the verification of the six grave violations against children and that the information contained in the report of the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict in the Philippines therefore does not reflect the full impact of armed conflict on children in the Philippines; Noting with concern the increase in instances of the six grave violations compared to the previous reporting period, including as a result of the Marawi siege in 2017, as well as the increased number of children detained by Government security forces for alleged association with armed groups; Condemning the recruitment and use of children, for combat and support roles, urging all parties to immediately and without conditions release all children associated with them, and further urging them to end and prevent recruitment and use of children under 18 years of age, in line with their obligations as set out in the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict, as applicable; Expressing concern at the deprivation of liberty of children for their association or alleged association with armed forces and armed groups; urging all parties to the armed conflict to consider children associated with armed groups, including those who may have committed crimes, primarily as victims of recruitment and use, to work to ensure their release and support their full reintegration through specialized child protection, including family- and community-based reintegration programmes, and including access to health care, psychosocial support and education programmes, as well as to raise awareness and work with communities to avoid stigmatization of these children and facilitate their return and to ensure that prosecution of children is carried out with respect for the rights of the child, that detention should be considered only as a measure of last resort and for the shortest appropriate period of time, and that alternatives to detention should be prioritized, in line with international law, and further urging the Government to comply with its obligations under the Convention on the Rights of the Child and its Optional Protocol on the involvement of children in armed conflict; Expressing deep concern at the killing and maiming of children, including those resulting from attacks against communities, crossfire, explosive remnants of war and improvised explosive devices, urging all parties to take steps to prevent and end such killing and maiming, and calling upon parties to respect their obligations under international humanitarian law, in particular the principles of distinction and proportionality enshrined therein; Expressing deep concern about both verified and unverified incidents of rape and other forms of sexual violence against children, strongly urging all parties to take immediate and specific measures to put an end to and prevent the perpetration of rape and other forms of sexual violence against children; and stressing the importance of accountability for those who commit sexual and gender-based violence against children, and of ensuring access to non-discriminatory and comprehensive specialized services, including psychosocial, health, legal and livelihood support and services to survivors of sexual violence; Strongly condemning the increase in attacks on schools and hospitals in violation of international law and affecting the access to quality education for at least 20,000 children, calling upon all parties to comply with applicable international law and to respect the civilian character of schools and hospitals, including their personnel, as such, and to end and prevent disproportionate or indiscriminate attacks or threats of attacks against those institutions and their personnel as well as the military use of schools and hospitals in violation of applicable international law; and noting the effect that attacks on schools and their use can have on the enjoyment of the right to education; Strongly condemning the abduction of children, including for recruitment and use and other forms of exploitation, and calling upon all concerned parties to cease the abduction of children and immediately release all abducted children; Encouraging further action to ensure humanitarian access; and the elimination of violence and the threat of violence against humanitarian personnel, and calling upon all parties to allow and facilitate, in accordance with international law, including international humanitarian law, safe, timely and unhindered humanitarian access, consistent with UN guiding principles for humanitarian assistance as well as the humanitarian principles of humanity, neutrality, impartiality and independence, to respect the exclusively humanitarian nature and impartiality of humanitarian aid and to respect the work of all United Nations humanitarian agencies, and their humanitarian partners, without adverse distinction; Expressing deep concern about the scale of the six grave violations affecting children of indigenous communities in the context of conflict between the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) and the New People’s Army (NPA), and the increased involvement of paramilitary groups, and about the renewed and intensified conflict during the reporting period, leading to displacement that mostly affected remote indigenous communities, notably in Davao, Northern Mindanao and Caraga; Encouraging the resumption of peace negotiations between the Government and armed groups and urging the parties to include child protection issues in respective peace talks, with the support of the United Nations and guided by, inter alia, the Practical Guidance for Mediators to protect children in armed conflict; Welcoming the inauguration of the Bangsamoro Transition Authority, marking the culmination of the peace process between the Government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF); and calling upon the Transition Authority to continue to implement the peace agreement and use the lessons learnt and best practices of UNICEF and the Office of the SRSG CAAC to prevent violations against children; Calling upon all parties who have not yet done so to enhance their engagement with the United Nations to develop and adopt appropriate standard operating procedures for the release and reintegration of children associated with parties to the conflict and cooperate with civilian child protection actors to facilitate their release and reintegration into their communities, and underlining that family and community-based reintegration of children formerly associated with parties to the conflict is essential to provide a future to these children and their families, as well as to prevent the risks of re-recruitment in violation of international law; To the Government of the Philippines Stressing the primary role of the Government in providing protection and relief to all children affected by armed conflict in the Philippines, and recalling that the Philippines is a State party to the Convention on the Rights of the Child and its Optional Protocol on the involvement of children in armed conflict; Welcoming the promulgation of the CSAC law in January 2019 and the signing of the Implementing Rules and Regulations in June 2019 and urging the Government to swiftly implement these domestic legal obligations and to reinforce the protection of children, including by taking preventive measures and ensuring accountability by thoroughly investigating allegations of violations against children and by bringing perpetrators to justice; Commending the Government of the Philippines for integrating gender-sensitive provisions in the CSAC law which include guarantees for access to education for girls in situations of armed conflict, as well as access to comprehensive health services;  Expressing serious concern at the deprivation of liberty of children for their association or alleged association with armed groups, including those who may have committed crimes, urging the Government to align its practice with the CSAC Law, including its provision that children associated with armed groups be treated primarily as victims of recruitment and use, and to comply with its obligations under the Convention on the Rights of the Child, in particular the obligation that the arrest, detention and imprisonment of children should only be considered as a measure of last resort and for the shortest appropriate period of time, and that, in all actions concerning children, the best interests of the child should be a primary consideration; also urging it to prioritize their reintegration, through family and community based programmes, including access to healthcare, psychosocial support and education programmes as well as raising awareness and working with communities to avoid stigmatization of these children and facilitate their return; and further urging the Government to ensure that the prosecution of children is carried out with respect for the rights of the child; Urging the Government to reinforce the protection of children, including by taking all necessary measures to prevent and end the six grave violations against children in the context of armed conflict; Encouraging the Government of the Philippines to take measures to put an end to violations committed against children, including by members of its security forces and in particular those involving a high number of instances of killing and maiming of children and attacks against schools and hospitals attributed to the Armed Forces of the Philippines during the reporting period; Urging the Government to expedite the revision of its protocol on handling children in armed conflict, to align it with the CSAC law and to ensure that victims of violations receive timely, effective, appropriate services and can access family- and community-based reintegration programs; Expressing grave concern at the increased attacks on schools and their personnel, particularly in indigenous communities; urging the Government to take measures for the protection of schools, teachers and children including in indigenous communities and calling upon the Government to fully implement its “National policy framework on learners and schools as zones of peace”; Welcoming the lifting of martial law in Mindanao in December 2019 and calling on the Government to facilitate humanitarian access to affected areas to assess the impact of the siege on the civilian population, particularly on children, and to provide humanitarian assistance as necessary; Calling upon the Government to implement the Convention on the Prohibition of the Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on their Destruction and to consider ratifying the Protocol on Explosive Remnants of War to the Convention on Prohibitions or Restrictions on the Use of Certain Conventional Weapons which may be deemed to be Excessively Injurious or to have Indiscriminate Effects in order to prevent killing and maiming of children through improvised explosive devices and explosive remnants of war; Urging the Government to pursue its efforts towards accountability, including through comprehensive, independent, timely and systematic investigation, and, as appropriate, prosecution, conviction and punishment of anyone found to be responsible for violations and abuses against children and to ensure that all victims have access to justice as well as to the medical, psychosocial and support services that they need; Calling upon the Government to address all ongoing violations against children, support the implementation of its national child protection procedures and guidelines and facilitate access to conflict affected areas for child protection actors; Further calling upon the Government to continue the constructive collaboration with the country task force on monitoring and reporting and the United Nations; and encouraging the Government to continue cooperation to strengthen capacity of its armed and security forces as well as auxiliary forces on child protection; Calling upon the Government to ensure that the rights and needs of conflict-affected children are taken into account during the talks and in the implementation of any future peace agreements, including provisions on release and reintegration of children associated with armed forces or armed groups, as well as provisions on the rights and well-being of children, and that these are integrated in peace negotiations, ceasefire and peace agreements and in provisions for ceasefire monitoring, where appropriate, and taking into account children’s views, where possible, in these processes, while recalling the existence of a Practical Guidance of Mediators to integrate child protection issues in these processes; To all armed groups operating in the Philippines, in particular the leadership of the Moro Islamic Liberation Front, the Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Fighters, the New People’s Army, the Abu Sayyaf Group, the Moro National Liberation Front and the Maute Group Urging NPA, Maute Group and Bangsamore Islamic Freedom Fighters and other armed groups to immediately end and prevent the recruitment and use of children, to issue military orders prohibiting the recruitment and use of anyone under 18 years of age and to immediately release all children from their ranks to civilian child protection actors and support their reintegration into society;  Calling on all listed armed groups to enter into dialogue with the UN for the purpose of action plans to end and prevent child recruitment and use; Expressing deep concern about reports of the use of children, including as human shields as by the Maute Group and the Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Fighters (BIFF); Expressing grave concern about the killing and maiming of children, as well as other grave violations against children, committed by armed groups; Urging the National Democratic Front of the Philippines (NDFP) and NPA to cease using children in any activity that may put them at risk; To community and religious leaders : Emphasizing the important role of community leaders in strengthening the protection of children affected by armed conflict and fostering reconciliation efforts; Urging them to publicly condemn and continue to advocate ending and preventing violations and abuses against children, in particular those involving the recruitment and use of children, killing and maiming, rape and other forms of sexual violence against children, abductions, and attacks and threats of attacks against schools and hospitals, and to support the reintegration of children affected by armed conflict in their communities, including by raising awareness to avoid stigmatization of such children.
Language:English
Score: 850723.6 - https://www.un.org/press/en/2020/sc14383.doc.htm
Data Source: un
For China and Russia, the supply of arms, military materiel and military advisers to the anti-Gaddafi forces constituted a violation of resolution 1973 (2011). (...) S/2012/163, 20 Mar. 2012, Para. 95 and 101. 65 Gaddafi forces intercept arms from Qatar, Al Jazeera, 5 July 2011, forces. (...) It is interesting to note that concerns on post-conflict proliferation of arms and misuse by NSA, as well as the limited chances of the anti-Gaddafi forces defeating Gaddafi’s forces, were put forward as reasons for restraint in the supply of arms to Libyan NSA.
Language:English
Score: 850658.7 - https://www.unidir.org/files/m...eaty-paul-holtom-eng-0-259.pdf
Data Source: un
Since 2015, UNICEF has supported the release and reintegration of 3,677 children who were used by armed forces and armed groups in South Sudan. The reintegration programme is comprehensive. (...) If adequate funding is provided, UNICEF will be able to support some 2,100 children released from armed forces and armed groups over the coming year. “I urge the international community to step forward and help UNICEF with the funds needed to continue the reintegration programme which is changing the lives of children used by armed forces and armed groups, but also as a support to uphold crucial conventions and laws that are under pressure,” said Ayoya.
Language:English
Score: 850504.6 - https://www.unicef.org/press-r...-south-sudan-risk-lack-funding
Data Source: un
Applying conventional arms control Applying conventional arms control in the context of United Nations arms embargoes Acknowledgements Support from UNIDIR core funders provides the foundation for all of the Institute’s activities. (...) Such sanction regimes also recognize the need to train and equip national forces adequately to fulfil both public security and defence requirements in environments plagued by significant levels of criminality, armed non-State actors and, increasingly, terrorism. (...) In Côte d’Ivoire, the arms embargo was adopted to prevent the rehabilitation of the capacity of the Air Force (2004; see case study).
Language:English
Score: 850221.3 - https://www.unidir.org/files/p...ions-arms-embargoes-en-718.pdf
Data Source: un
Complaint of armed invasion of Taiwan (Formosa) 1946-1951 The People’s Republic of China considered the June 1950 mobilization by the United States of military forces in Taiwan, also known as “Formosa”, an act of aggression and brought the matter to the Security Council on 24 August 1950. (...) Complaint by Portugal (Goa) 1959-1963 The Security Council took up this item in response to a complaint by Portugal concerning the full-scale armed attack by Indian armed forces on the Portuguese territories of Goa, Daman and Diu in India. (...) The Indonesian question (II) 1946-1951 This item relates to the 1947 hostilities between the armed forces of Indonesia and the Netherlands that followed the 1945 declaration of independence of Indonesia.
Language:English
Score: 849996.7 - https://www.un.org/securitycouncil/content/repertoire/asia
Data Source: un
Secretary-General Says Arms Trade Treaty’s Entry into Force Is Testimony of International Commitment to Stop Irresponsible Arms Transfers | Meetings Coverage and Press Releases Skip to main content Welcome to the United Nations Meetings Coverage and Press Releases Search the United Nations Search Advanced Search Toggle navigation Home Secretary-General Latest Press Releases Press Conferences General Assembly Latest Meetings Coverage Press Releases Security Council Latest Meetings Coverage Press Releases Press Conferences Economic and Social Council Latest Meetings Coverage Press Releases International Court of Justice United Nations Print Press Release SG/SM/16436-DC/3537-L/T/4440 23 December 2014 Secretary-General Statements and Messages Secretary-General Says Arms Trade Treaty’s Entry into Force Is Testimony of International Commitment to Stop Irresponsible Arms Transfers The following statement by UN Secretary‑General Ban Ki‑moon was issued today: Tomorrow, 24 December 2014, the Arms Trade Treaty will enter into force. (...) The speed with which the Arms Trade Treaty came into force — less than two years since its historic adoption by the United Nations General Assembly — is testimony to the commitment of States, international organizations and civil society to stop irresponsible arms transfers.  (...) It is also critical that we continue to promote universal participation in the Arms Trade Treaty by encouraging all States, particularly major arms exporters and importers, to join this Treaty. 
Language:English
Score: 849939.1 - https://www.un.org/press/en/2014/sgsm16436.doc.htm
Data Source: un
For example, an agreement to end the recruitment and use of children by Government forces might include actions calling on the authorities to:  issue military command orders prohibiting the recruitment and use of children  criminalize the recruitment and use of children  integrate age-verification mechanisms in recruitment procedures  release all children identified in the ranks of security forces  ensure children’s reintegration into civilian life Timeline: 1996 Publication of Graça Machel report The Report of Graça Machel: Impact of Armed Conflict on Children highlights the disproportionate impact of war on children and identifies them as the primary victims of armed conflict. 1997 1998 1999 2000 General Assembly creates mandate The General Assembly creates the mandate of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict. (...) Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child adopted The Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict is adopted by the General Assembly to protect children under 18 from recruitment and use in hostilities. 2002 Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child enters into force The Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict enters into force. 2004 2005 2009 2011 2014 Security Council Resolution 1539 Security Council resolution 1539 requests the establishment of a systematic and comprehensive Monitoring and Reporting Mechanism to provide timely, accurate and reliable information on the recruitment and use of children and other violations committed against children affected by armed conflict. (...) Launch of “Children, Not Soldiers” campaign Launch of the “Children, Not Soldiers” campaign aimed at ending child recruitment and use by government armed forces in conflict by the end of 2016. 2003 Security Council Resolution 1460 Security Council resolution 1460 calls for dialogue with parties to conflict that recruit or use children to develop clear, time-bound Action Plans to end the practices. 2015 Security Council resolution 2225 Security Council resolution 2225 establishes “abduction of children” as a trigger to list parties to armed conflict in the annual report of the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict.
Language:English
Score: 849691.3 - https://childrenandarmedconfli...nflict-Office-Brochure-web.pdf
Data Source: un