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The Armed Forces are to limit their views to projects they have participated in since 2001. 2. (...) It is the Government that, via government decisions, determines the countries to which the Armed Forces are to provide support. The SALW/CA activities are often carried out within the framework of the Armed Forces’ security sector reform (SSR) activities. (...) The country-specific work carried out by the Armed Forces also tangibly strengthens implementation of the PoA.
Language:English
Score: 1060739.5 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...Views-on-assistance-Sweden.pdf
Data Source: un
INTRODUCTION 1.0 Hundreds of thousands of children are associated with armed forces and armed groups in conflicts around the world. (...) It does not only refer to a child who is taking or has taken a direct part in hostilities. 2.2 “Armed forces” refers to the armed forces of a State. 2.3 “Armed groups” refers to groups distinct from armed forces as defined by Article 4 of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict. 2.4 “Recruitment” refers to compulsory, forced and voluntary conscription or enlistment of children into any kind of armed force or armed group. 2.5 “Unlawful recruitment or use” is recruitment or use of children under the age stipulated in the international treaties applicable to the armed force or armed group in question or under applicable national law. 2.6 “Release” Includes the process of formal and controlled disarmament and demobilisation of children from an armed force or armed group as well as the informal ways in which children leave by escaping, being captured or by any other means. (...) Efforts should always be taken to involve the community in planning for programming to ensure that it is adequately supported to care for children released from armed forces or armed groups and to prevent association with armed forces or armed groups from taking place.
Language:English
Score: 1059016.3 - https://www.unicef.org/mali/me.../1561/file/ParisPrinciples.pdf
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Programme Children recruited by armed forces or armed groups Thousands of boys and girls are used as soldiers, cooks, spies and more in armed conflicts around the world. (...) Children become part of an armed force or group for various reasons. Some are abducted, threatened, coerced or manipulated by armed actors. (...) The recruitment and use of children by armed forces or armed groups is a grave violation of child rights and international humanitarian law.
Language:English
Score: 1058652.6 - https://www.unicef.org/protect...dren-recruited-by-armed-forces
Data Source: un
An entire chapter of this code of ethics for all the armed forces is devoted to ethics in operations. (...) Title IV describes education in the armed forces, which is organized as follows: • Basic military training • Advanced military training • Higher studies in national defence 1.1 Basic training for all members of the armed forces The purpose of basic training is to prepare career members of the armed forces to join the ranks and to train soldiers and sailors for entry into the auxiliary or professional forces. (...) It is highly significant that the Royal Ordinances for the Armed Forces give precedence to international humanitarian law.
Language:English
Score: 1052444.3 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/sixth...eva_StatesComments/Spain_E.pdf
Data Source: un
On 29 January 2009, the Qatari Armed Forces formed a committee on international humanitarian law. (...) The Department of Legal Affairs of the Armed Forces General Staff has issued a publication entitled “Overview of the Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC),” which addresses major topics in LOAC that Armed Forces members need to be aware of and understand. (...) The Qatari Armed Forces is in the process of incorporating material on the rights of the child into the curricula of the Military College and the Armed Forces Academy.
Language:English
Score: 1049554.8 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/sixth...eva_StatesComments/Qatar_E.pdf
Data Source: un
Qatar is bound, inter alia, by the provisions of the Convention on the Rights of the Child regarding children’s participation in armed conflicts, and the Qatar Armed Forces do not recruit, train or employ children. (...) (a) With a view to strengthening the implementation of international humanitarian law, an international humanitarian law committee has been established within the Qatar Armed Forces. It comprises representatives of all services of the armed forces and aims, through its local branches, and in coordination with relevant associations and organizations, to disseminate a culture of international humanitarian law among all members of the armed forces. (...) (b) The Armed Forces international humanitarian law committee prepares programmes and training curriculums on the issue that are taught to military officers and other ranks in mandatory courses at Qatar Armed Forces training institutes.
Language:English
Score: 1049007.5 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/sixth...tatesComments/Qatar_2010_E.pdf
Data Source: un
In some countries, paramilitary forces are included in a nation’s armed forces. Importantly, states, and by extension their armed forces are responsible for adhering to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child and its optional protocol on the Involvement of Children in Armed Conflict. (...) If a child is recruited by force by an armed force or group, this is considered as two violations – abduction and recruitment. 6 Denial of humanitarian access for children. (...) Armed forces and non-State armed actors should make formal and specific commitments to prevent and address conflict-related sexual violence. 4 Ensure humanitarian access for children.
Language:English
Score: 1048975.1 - https://www.unicef.org/media/9...le/MRM-Advocacy-Brief-2021.pdf
Data Source: un
The introduction of the law of armed conflict (international humanitarian law - IHL) to the education and training curriculum for the staff of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Poland constitutes a practical implementation of the provisions included also in item 11 of the Resolution of UN Assembly General no. 67/93 Status of the Protocols Additional to the Geneva Conventions of 1949 and relating to the protection of victims of armed conflicts adopted on 14 December 2013. (...) General Staff of the Polish Armed Forces controls and supervises the units of the Armed Forces of the Republic of Poland and evaluates familiarity with IHL issues by testing knowledge. (...) Additionally, specialist courses and training sesswns are organised in the field of the law of armed conflict: specialist course in the field of the law of armed conflict for commanders of elements organised by the Navy in Gdynia, specialist courses in the field of the law of armed conflict for the commanders of companies and platoons of the Land Forces organised in the S.
Language:English
Score: 1048169.7 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/sixth/69/protocols/poland_e.pdf
Data Source: un
By April 2022, Russian armed forces withdrew from Sumy area. In May 2022, a Ukrainian counter-offensive forced Russian armed forces to retreat from Kharkiv. (...) This was the case in settlements situated north of Kyiv, where Russian armed forces were forced to halt their advance; to the south of Chernihiv, while Russian armed forces were launching offensives to capture the city; and close to the separation line between Russian armed forces and Ukrainian armed forces in the Sumy region. (...) Perpetrators also accused victims of sharing information with Ukrainian armed forces and committing attacks and sabotage against Russian armed forces.
Language:English
Score: 1047756.9 - https://www.un.org/sexualviole...o-draft/Inquiry-on-Ukraine.pdf
Data Source: un
It is more appropriate to use the term ’Children Associated with Armed Forces and Armed Groups’. This is because children are recruited into and used by armed forces and armed groups for many difference purposes, not only as combatants. (...) As in many situations, children in Sudan joined armed forces and armed groups for many various and intertwined reasons. (...) For example, UNICEF and partners train armed forces and armed groups on child rights and child protection and raise their awareness on their national and international commitments to protect children in armed conflict.
Language:English
Score: 1047261.7 - https://www.unicef.org/sudan/s...ildren-affected-armed-conflict
Data Source: un