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Discriminatory behavior is difficult to identify because there normally isn’t any “smoking gun”. Discriminatory behavior is seen as damaging because it causes delay and uncertainty on the part of the competitor, and a sense of impotence or lack of confidence in the GSR 2008 5 regulator in being able to combat the discriminatory behavior. (...) By separating these divisions, the incentive and ability of an incumbent to engage in discriminatory behavior is blunted. This new institutional framework means that discriminatory behavior will be much more difficult for the incumbent to achieve, and easier for the regulator and competitors to identify, which should deter the behavior in the first place.
Language:English
Score: 853761.8 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/treg...pers/Malcolm_Webb_session3.pdf
Data Source: un
.) ▪ Complex grief ▪ Separation from loved ones (especially sudden moves/ move to a foster placement, parental discord) Traumatic Reactions/ Symptoms: Adults As stated earlier reactions are individual, however, here are some signs to be aware of: - Intense and ongoing emotional upset; not able to tolerate own or others’ feelings or feeling disconnected or numb - Anxiety/intense, unexplained fears - Depressive symptoms/ suicidal ideations/ self-harm behaviors - Excessive blame/perfectionism or thoughts of worthlessness - Eating disorders/Addictions - Sexually acting out - Relationship problems (including withdrawing from others) - Confusion/difficulty concentrating/intrusive thoughts/ all or nothing (black and white thinking) ??? (...) ▪ Share thoughts ▪ Ask Questions Traumatic Reactions/ Symptoms in Children & Adolescents Again reactions/symptoms are individual (NCTSN)- also refer to age range in the NCTSN Educator’s Toolkit ▪ Intense and ongoing emotional upsat ▪ Depressive symptoms or anxiety ▪ Behavioral changes ▪ Difficulties with self-regulation ▪ Problems relating to others or forming attachments ▪ Regression or loss of previously acquired skills ▪ Attention and academic difficulties ▪ Nightmares ▪ Difficulty sleeping and eating ▪ Physical symptoms; i.e., aches and pains ▪ Older children/adolescents: drug use, alchol use, risky behaviors including unhealthy sexual activity Understand ▪ The current pandemic may have contributed to a traumatic event or triggered a reaction because of a previous traumatic event in students ▪ This could lead to child traumatic stress (stress resulting from exposure to one or more traumatic events manifesting in a variety of ways - reactions previously mentioned) which can play out in the classroom. ▪ The reactions can intefere with teaching and learning and social interactions and may be triggered by things such as tone of voice, places, people, loud sounds, event anniversaries, etc. ▪ There are risk factors that can exacerbate reactions such as poverty, inadequate parenting, prior history of trauma and the severity of the event (i.e., hospitalization was required). ▪ There are protective factors that can mitigate traumatic events such as supportive/loving caregivers; how the adults cope/d with the sitation and a caring school community. Acknowledge ▪ The possibility/ probability that one or more of your students have been adversely affected by a traumatic event in the past that current conditions exacerbated or that this current climare has created a traumatic response ▪ The importance of a welcoming school environment that will not re-traumatize anyone ▪ Any needs that you have to help you build positive relationships with students Do ▪ Help to create a safe, nurturing environment that includes teaching, and, sometimes reteaching expected behaviors ▪ Remember to respond from the what has happened/ what traumatic event could have happened to a student who is exhibiting concerning behaviors or a change in behavior instead of what’s wrong with a student. ▪ Resist the urge to take behaviors personally or expect that because you have a good relationship with a student that they won’t lash out at you or dissociate ▪ Refer students to the school counsellor and/or ET if necessary. ▪ Use self-care strategies as students who exhibit traumatic stress can contribute to burn out Closing ▪ Comments ▪ Questions ▪ Suggestions
Language:English
Score: 853720.7 - https://www.cepal.org/sites/de...mons_-_trauma_presentation.pdf
Data Source: un
PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF ALL HUMAN RIGHTS, CIVIL, POLITICAL, ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RIGHTS, INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO DEVELOPMENT : WRITTEN STATEMENT / SUBMITTED BY FRANCE LIBERTES: FONDATION DANIELLE MITTERRAND
While welcoming and appreciating the Chittagong Hill Tracts Accord of 1997, signed between the Government of the Peoples‟ Republic of Bangladesh and the Parbattya Chattgram Jana Samhati Samiti (PCJSS), the signatory political party of Jumma peoples, we are deeply concerned simultaneously at the gross human rights violations against and discriminatory behavior towards Jumma peoples, land grabbing by government sponsored settlers and influential non-indigenous persons, communal attack on Jumma peoples, increasing violence against indigenous women (including children) and religious persecution, among others. (...) We have also observed, with great disturbance, the proliferation of discriminatory behavior and attitude towards Jumma indigenous peoples. (...) We believe that these conditions are against the fundamental rights of citizens ensured in the Constitution of Bangladesh. The prejudiced behavior further prevails in recent conditions that have been imposed on the NGOs working in the CHT which compel the NGOs to demonstrate the ratio of indigenous Jumma staff to non-indigenous Bengali staff members working in each project.
Language:English
Score: 853005.6 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...open&DS=A/HRC/21/NGO/80&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF ALL HUMAN RIGHTS, CIVIL, POLITICAL, ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RIGHTS, INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO DEVELOPMENT :WRITTEN STATEMENT / SUBMITTED BY HUMAN RIGHTS ADVOCATES INC.
Territorial Scope of Regulations The GDPR, as the most rigorous framework, zealously regulates entities’ processing of Personal Information (“PI”) if such entity: (1) is established in the EU; (2) offers goods or services, irrespective of whether a payment of the individual is required, to individuals in the EU; and (3) monitors behavior of individuals in the EU.14 Alternatively APPI is a more moderate approach because it applies to any business or organization supplying goods or services to a person in Japan and collecting PI.15 CaCPA is the narrowest geographic framework as it applies only to organizations doing business in California.16 10 HRC Right to Privacy in the Digital Age, A/HRC/RES/37/2, 22 March 2018, 11 Report of Special Rapporteur on the Right to Privacy, A/HRC/37/62 ( 28 February 2018). 12 Id. 13 Geofencing, International Association of Privacy Professionals, https://iapp.org/resources/article/geofencing/ 14 GDPR, Art 3. 15 APPI, Art. 75. 16 CaCPA 1789. (...) APPI definition of PI appears to be broader than CaCPA and GDPR by recognizing that there may be types of information that are not actual PI without an identifier.21 For example, certain types of behavioral information (e.g., cookies, etc.) could be considered non-PI under the APPI if the identifiers are removed, while the CaCPA and GDPR may require a further analysis of whether the behavioral information identifies an individual.22 IV.
Language:English
Score: 853005.6 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...pen&DS=A/HRC/40/NGO/234&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
DRAFT AMENDMENTS TO PART 1 OF THE MANUAL OF TESTS AND CRITERIA
On the basis of these considerations it is recommended that the projection hazard criteria of Test 6(c) be revised along the following lines: .1 That witness screen response be used as the sole means of defining projection hazards; .2 That 2 mm thick ASTM 2024-T3 aluminum be used as the recommended witness screen material; .3 That any indentation in the witness screen deep enough to produce fracture be considered indicative of Division 1.2 behavior; .4 That any indentation in the witness screen deeper than 1.75 mm but with no fracture of the witness screen be considered indicative of Division 1.4 behavior; .5 That an indentation in the witness screen of a depth greater than 0.5mm and less than or equal to 1.75 mm be considered indicative of Division 1.4S behavior; and .6 That indentation in the witness screen of 0.5 mm or less, be considered indicative of no projection hazard.
Language:English
Score: 853005.6 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...ST/SG/AC.10/C.3/1997/19&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
WRITTEN STATEMENT /SUBMITTED BY PERMANENT ASSEMBLY FOR HUMAN RIGHTS
Anyhow it’s important to take notice that there are important differences between the urban agglomerations in our country, and that the indicator’s behavior are tied to the evolution of Gran Buenos Aires (City of Buenos Aires City and Buenos Aires suburbs) since this urban agglomeration represents the 33.4% of the urban population of the country and the 37.8% of the economically active population. (...) But, aside from observing the differences between the last unemployment rate’s report, it’s necessary to appreciate which was the behavior of the different urban agglomerations by studding more specifically each behavior and relating them with other employment market’s indicators, to reach a conclusion about its causes.
Language:English
Score: 853005.6 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...en&DS=E/CN.4/2002/NGO/3&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
The “fiscal” aspects of monetary policies imply themselves a non-neutrality, associated with the behavior of seignorage revenues and the effects on the demand for money. (...) Economic policy-making confronts incentive problems leading to opportunistic behavior, as well as shocks on the economy that may require “flexible” actions. (...) Clearly, there is no reason to assign behavioral meaning to a formula for interpolating data.
Language:English
Score: 852941.3 - HTTP://DACCESS-ODS.UN.ORG/ACCE...GET?OPEN&DS=LC/L.1726-P&LANG=E
Data Source: ods
Founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School); Dilip Soman (Canada Research Chair in Behavioural Science and Economics. (...) Leads the UN Behavioural Science Group in the UN Innovation Network); and Renos Vakis (Lead Economist with the Poverty and Equity Global Practice where he leads the Mind, Behavior, and Development Unit at the World Bank) the event will include engaging guest interviews that will unpack the significance and potential benefit of behavioral insights and public policy from a wide range of perspectives. (...) It is just the beginning and I look forward to a time when we can start witnessing the expanded impact of behavioral science for our work on the SDGs. The “ Shaping Public Policy Through Behavioral Science event will undoubtably  be great platform for further knowledge sharing and collaboration that will offer new opportunities for us to design even better policies and programmes”, said UNSSC Director Jafar Javan.  
Language:English
Score: 852014.2 - https://www.unssc.org/news-and...es-event-shaping-public-policy
Data Source: un
Appropriate methodologies allow early detection of adolescent mental health issues and risk of suicidal behavior. One of the most important aspects at an early stage is to detect an adolescent prone to suicide and depression. (...) The program aims to identify the leading causes of suicidal behavior among adolescents, such as: • mental health issues (depression and anxiety), the incidence of which, according to the study in Kazakhstan, is 3 times higher than that of average European adolescents • risky behavior of adolescents, which is burdened by their mental state • lack of knowledge about the importance of mental health, its connection with physical health and where to turn for help if necessary 2. It allows to identify children with suicidal behavior and problems that can cause it. 3. The program increases readiness of school and college staff, as well as doctors to help if adolescences are found to have mental health issues and suicidal behavior.
Language:English
Score: 852014.2 - https://www.unicef.org/kazakhstan/en/adolescents-and-youth
Data Source: un
JAPAN: PERIODIC REPORT
See III, Article 2, 1 of this Periodic Report for the Act on the Promotion of Efforts to Eliminate Unfair Discriminatory Speech and Behavior against Persons Originating from Outside Japan” (hereinafter referred to as “Hate Speech Elimination Act”)
Language:English
Score: 850192.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...pen&DS=CERD/C/JPN/10-11&Lang=E
Data Source: ods