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Improving developing countries’ capacity to leverage the potential of green and climate-resilient bonds could be a game-changer for financing nationally determined contributions (NDCs) and national adaptation plans (NAPs). However, green bonds still represent only a fraction of total bonds issued globally and only a small number of developing countries are accessing such market, notably in Africa, where in 2020, Africa still only accounted for 0.003% of total green bond issuance. Building on UNCDF’s Sovereign Borrowers Conference held during the 2021 General Assembly, the Government of Malawi and Chair of the LDC Group, with UNCDF, UNDP and the GCF will bring together global leaders to highlight the actions needed for developing countries, particularly LDCs, to leverage debt markets to increase their access to affordable finance for climate action.
Language:English
Score: 1116975 - https://www.un.org/ldcportal/taxonomy/term/1108/feed
Data Source: un
Treasury securities at 10-year constant maturity 10-year average return consistent with FOMC expectations for federal funds rate 2 Monthly Briefing on the World Economic Situation and Prospects Except for a brief period in late-2013, financial markets have consistently priced in a slower rise in United States’ policy rates compared to the expectations expressed by the participants of the FOMC, offering a significant negative term premium on the market yields on government bonds since 2012 (figure 1). (...) The market yield on 10-year Government bonds in the United States has risen by about 60 basis points since the presiden- tial election, signaling both a faster pace of interest rates rises by the Fed and a rise in Government borrowing costs. (...) This impact is already apparent, as emerging market economies experienced the largest recorded weekly outflows from bond funds in the week following the election in the United States.2 Developed economies Canada: provinces show support for a national carbon price Canada continues to make important strides in its climate policy, demonstrating concerted efforts to meet its obligation under the Paris Agreement of cutting emissions by 30 per cent from 2005 levels by 2030.
Language:English
Score: 1116122.3 - https://www.un.org/development...s/45/publication/wesp_mb98.pdf
Data Source: un
In this changing external context, there are many signs that a slowdown in Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) financial markets, particularly debt markets, which have been breaking issuance records for the past six years, may slowdown from now on. (...) And LAC companies, having issued record amounts of foreign currency bonds may now struggle to service their debt. In October, credit-rating agency Moody’s downgraded the bonds of Brazil’s Petrobras to tow notches above speculative grade because of the impact of falling oil prices and the weaker real on its debt. (...) However, there is still a shortage of bonds at a global level and the region still enjoys good economic policy management for the most part, so LAC debt markets may continue to enjoy momentum despite occasional bursts of high volatility – even if not at the record levels of recent years.
Language:English
Score: 1115156.1 - https://www.cepal.org/pt-br/node/25364
Data Source: un
This has led outstanding corporate bond levels to soar in many emerging economies during the post-crisis period. (...) However, Saudi Arabia managed to make the largest-ever bond issuance from an emerging economy by selling $17.5 billion internationally. (...) The larger-than-expected success amid low global interest rates that Saudi Arabia experienced has increased liquidity and confidence in financial markets as it paves the way for further international bond issuances in the near future.
Language:English
Score: 1112237.3 - https://www.un.org/development...bonds-risk-global-economy.html
Data Source: un
The governments of India and Israel have raised about US$40 billion since the 1950s using these bonds, noted Suhas L. Ketkar and Dilip Ratha in a 2007 World Bank research paper on diaspora bonds.  (...) By August 2012, the fund had attracted pledges of about US$31 million, according to The Guardian , a UK newspaper.  Issuing Diaspora bonds and turning remittance flows into bonds or instruments that can be sold to investors are good alternatives to borrowing from the international capital market, says the AfDB. (...) Trust is another important factor in marketing bonds to the diaspora. Transparency in the use of funds could ease concerns.
Language:English
Score: 1108701.9 - https://www.un.org/africarenew...ration-wealth-fund-development
Data Source: un
Can you speak more about the green and blue bonds? We at the UN Economic Commission for Africa are working with partners to further develop financing opportunities through market-based mechanisms including through green or blue bonds. (...) It is essential that the $100 billion is mobilised, but we should also understand that this is a starting point, and that the real needs go far beyond this figure.  Green and blue bonds are opportunities that have been used in developed markets for many years but unfortunately, Africa today has less than 1% of the green and blue bond market globally. (...) Some countries have successfully issued green and blue bonds. Egypt issued a bond in renewable energy in 2020 and Seychelles issued a blue bond in 2018.
Language:English
Score: 1107837.3 - https://www.un.org/africarenew...rities-africa-cop26-and-beyond
Data Source: un
The increase in government bond yields in the US since early 2013 and the Fed’s indication of May 2013 that it may taper its unconventional monetary policy have correlated with sizable capital outflows and currency depreciation in emerging markets; this points to pronounced global macro-financial interdependencies. (...) At the same time, domestic-currency bond markets have been established. Equally noteworthy are substantial reforms in financial regulation and supervision as well as more fiscal prudence and lower public debt levels. 4 Nevertheless, as I have mentioned before, some new risks have emerged and they must be taken seriously. • First, the current combination of higher interest rates and slower GDP growth in emerging markets may expose corporate or banking sector fragilities, thereby discouraging international investors and inducing additional capital exit and depreciation. • Second, emerging markets and advanced economies are now much more integrated than they used to be in the 1990s. (...) In addition, despite the build-up of domestic-currency bond markets, there is still considerable reliance on foreign funding as a large share of local currency bonds is held by foreign investors.
Language:English
Score: 1106505.5 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-...loads/2014/09/2014_Austria.pdf
Data Source: un
Bloomberg also publishes data on public bond issuance, as well as secondary market prices, as do private banks, such as J.P. (...) In addition, while improving, data on domestic bond markets is generally not robust (see chapter II.B). (...) Since then, international agreements have focused on market- based solutions, such as contractual clauses in bond contracts.
Language:English
Score: 1105794 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-...016/03/2016-IATF-Chapter2E.pdf
Data Source: un
In recent times therefore, starting around 2010, there has been a sharp shift to non-concessional borrowing with particular interest in loans from private commercial bond markets, with an allure that these loans have no rules or conditions. (...) Several options could be considered before the Eurobond maturity if the Zambian Government wants to avoid a default: a) Bond buyback: A bond buyback allows the Zambian Government to pay for the principal at the current market value of the Eurobond which is only around US$500 million. (...) Zambia and Mozambique issued sovereign bonds in the international capital markets and have been contracting non-concessional debt from external private and public sources.
Language:English
Score: 1105677.5 - https://www.un.org/ldc5/sites/...e_of_zambia_and_mozambique.pdf
Data Source: un
The basic purposes of those restructurings, which occurred in the somewhat simpler world of predominantly commercial bank lending, was generally to reduce the country’s debt burden so that, among other things, its resources could be redirected to other uses, debt service could be brought current, creditor relations could be normalized and the country could return to the voluntary markets. Things have worked somewhat differently ever since bonds replaced commercial bank loans as the primary component of Emerging Markets finance. (...) Regardless of the factors that led G-7 governments to encourage the market to adopt the 75% CAC’s that are now routinely included in new bond issues, the many prior bond issues that do not include such CAC’s will probably require that, for the foreseeable future, most country debt reschedulings continue to be structured in the form of exchange offers. (...) By 1997, it had begun to become clear that official sector support for EM countries in crisis was falling short of market expectations. In its 1998 Annual Report, EMTA cautioned that, although rescheduling bonds may sometimes be necessary, any policy that emphasized bond rescheduling over the need for EM countries to take measures to avoid them was likely to drive investors away.
Language:English
Score: 1105172.4 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-...007/03/20070306_chamberlin.pdf
Data Source: un