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Inflows • As a matter of policy, the sovereign does not borrow on a commercial basis in foreign currency. All commercial borrowings are in domestic currency and funding is available even at the long end upto 30 years. • Indian Companies can borrow funds overseas within an aggregate annual ceiling and in terms of the framework prescribed for External Commercial Borrowings (ECB). (...) Borrowings for export finance, perpetual debt and subordinated debt are outside this ceiling.
Language:English
Score: 891032.4 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-.../20080408_Leeladhar-Speech.pdf
Data Source: un
“The countries give a skeleton of information about why they are borrowing. There is a need for transparency when countries are taking on sovereign debt,” Dr. (...) “The continent cannot afford to continue borrowing at very high-interest rates,” Dr. Mutize said, adding that countries also tend to borrow short-term for long-term projects, including infrastructure projects which are not viable in the short-term, making it difficult to repay. Theo Chiviru, Team Lead for Africa and Asia, Open Government Partnership, reiterated calls for transparency, pointing out that there is still a lot of secrecy around borrowing and how debt is managed on the continent.
Language:English
Score: 887447.9 - https://www.uneca.org/storys/a...ntable-managing-sovereign-debt
Data Source: un
“The countries give a skeleton of information about why they are borrowing. There is a need for transparency when countries are taking on sovereign debt,” Dr. (...) “The continent cannot afford to continue borrowing at very high-interest rates,” Dr. Mutize said, adding that countries also tend to borrow short-term for long-term projects, including infrastructure projects which are not viable in the short-term, making it difficult to repay. Theo Chiviru, Team Lead for Africa and Asia, Open Government Partnership, reiterated calls for transparency, pointing out that there is still a lot of secrecy around borrowing and how debt is managed on the continent.
Language:English
Score: 887447.9 - https://www.uneca.org/node/1608
Data Source: un
“The countries give a skeleton of information about why they are borrowing. There is a need for transparency when countries are taking on sovereign debt,” Dr. (...) “The continent cannot afford to continue borrowing at very high-interest rates,” Dr. Mutize said, adding that countries also tend to borrow short-term for long-term projects, including infrastructure projects which are not viable in the short-term, making it difficult to repay. Theo Chiviru, Team Lead for Africa and Asia, Open Government Partnership, reiterated calls for transparency, pointing out that there is still a lot of secrecy around borrowing and how debt is managed on the continent.
Language:English
Score: 887447.9 - https://www.uneca.org/fr/node/1608
Data Source: un
Municipalities apply for credit to the MBB which evaluates their proposals for legal and economic validity. Borrowers must also get approval from their own governing entity. (...) It also has a high credit rating (AAA by Standard & Poors and Fitch, and Aa1 by Moody’s) which helps lower borrowing interest rates. The MBB can issue a bond representing a single municipality if the borrowing needs are great enough. (...) SOLUTION • Create greater homogeneity (and hence liquidity) and enhance credit rating in order to lower borrowing costs. INNOVATION • Consolidate municipal government public purpose borrowing needs into large, higher credit rated issuances. • Fewer, larger issuances offer lower underwriting costs. • Larger, homogeneous issues generate greater liquidity.
Language:English
Score: 880565.2 - https://www.un.org/esa/sustdev...egm2007/presentations/dodd.pdf
Data Source: un
Market Finance is often too costly ‘Ex If priced at market price, to high for borrower’ Sub-sovereign/ local level lending/ finance ‘Responding to decentralization and local needs’ 2. Sovereign financing constrains access for local creditworthy borrowers ‘Ex LMs/ utilities cannot access finance’ Guarantees and insurances ‘Mitigating risk and provide affordable credits to borrowers’ 1. Difficult to attract market finance ‘Ex 1st timers/ tenor issues/ exchange risks’ FI ResponseConstraints Innovative financing instruments to facilitate market borrowing: constraints, responses and challenges 8 15 Action areas for utility finance “Getting the basics right” within utilities and at Government/ ODA Initiate country processes for reforms and transactions Country process started in Kenya Two utilities identified in West Africa Initiate regional processes for benchmarking and “credit rating” and capacity building/ experience Sharing Collaboration with AfDB (as well as CRAs, IFC, DCA) rating for selected utilities 16 External environment to provide incentives for improved utility performance – intergovernmental transfers/OBA to mitigate undue policy and regulatory risks to facilitate transactions and benchmarking Internal environment of utilities and service providers to enhance financial viability and operational performance What is needed to leverage market resources?
Language:English
Score: 879367.5 - https://www.un.org/esa/sustdev...africa/presentations/mehta.pdf
Data Source: un
The Committee also notes that, although the level of temporary borrowing by active missions from such cash surpluses has been declining over the past three years, it remains a matter of concern because these missions continue to rely on borrowing to meet their cash flow requirements due to delays in receiving assessed contributions. (...) Regarding the Secretary-General’s proposal for the General Assembly to authorize limited borrowing between active peacekeeping missions to meet temporary cash flow requirements, the Advisory Committee reiterates that such a proposal could be an inducement for the late payment of assessed contributions.
Language:English
Score: 877990.4 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/fifth...losed%20PKOs_Chair%20ACABQ.pdf
Data Source: un
EMs also lowered their borrowing costs because of loose monetary policies in many advanced countries,  even preceding the financial crisis of 2008.   (...) By late 2015, U.S. interest rates, which are the benchmark for global borrowing  costs, will begin to rise again.  And yet, EMs can continue to grow at a formidable clip, but the impetus to such growth will have to  come from within with some assistance from outside.    (...) AMF Guarantee will do business  only in EMs and it will structure and guarantee projects by delivering triple‐A ratings in local currency on  the national rating scale to their underlying borrowings. That, in turn, will allow local institutional  investors to invest in instruments other than domestic treasuries.  
Language:English
Score: 877577 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/wp-...ent_BottConsulting_10Nov14.pdf
Data Source: un
In the worst affected areas, chiefly rural communities, crops have been wiped out and livestock died, while communities are being forced to sell their assets, and borrow money and food to survive. Some 6.2 million are in need of humanitarian assistance. (...) In the worst affected areas, chiefly rural communities, crops have been wiped out and livestock died, while communities are being forced to sell their assets, and borrow money and food to survive. Some 6.2 million are in need of humanitarian assistance. (...) In the worst affected areas, chiefly rural communities, crops have been wiped out and livestock died, while communities are being forced to sell their assets, and borrow money and food to survive. Some 6.2 million are in need of humanitarian assistance.
Language:English
Score: 877501.3 - https://www.unocha.org/somalia/donor-contributions
Data Source: un
Borrow Books & More | United Nations Skip to main content Toggle navigation Welcome to the United Nations العربية 中文 English Français हिन्दी Português Русский Español Kiswahili Dag Hammarskjöld Library Toggle navigation About » Contact Us Our Activities Our Mandate & History Our Collections UN Depository Libraries Library News Research the UN » UN Resources & Documents UN Digital Library Index to Proceedings Linked Data Services Research Guides Speeches Voting Information UN Member States on the Record Find » Articles, Books & More Databases Journals UN Resources & Documents UN Libraries Help » Training Research Guides Ask DAG Services for... » Delegates UN Staff Researchers & Librarians General Public Using the Library » Access Electronic Resources Borrow Books & More Print, Scan & Copy Request Articles, Books & Documents Visit the Library Open Science Conference 2021 Contact Us » Contact Us Search: Search:  Search for: Books, articles and more in DAG Discovery (this search will open in a new window) UN documents and publications in the United Nations Digital Library (this search will open in a new window) Borrow Books & More Borrow books and more | UN/John Gillespie Who can borrow books from the Dag Hammarskjöld Library? Employees of the Permanent Missions, UN staff, interns, and consultants may borrow up to 10 items at the time. Circulating items can be checked out for 28 days. (...) Some materials may have shorter loan periods or may not be borrowed at all. Clients are permitted, however, to make photocopies of the following non-circulating items: UN documents Reference materials League of Nations & Woodrow Wilson Collections materials Anyone with a valid UN pass (including NGOs and media) can consult books, journals, official documents, or any other material on the library premises.
Language:English
Score: 873310.45 - https://www.un.org/en/library/page/borrow-books-more
Data Source: un