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Development Implications of International Migration Different migration flows imply different nature and levels of migrants’ inclusion in the origin and destination countries Varying development implications: remittances, brain drain/brain gain issues, role of transnational communities in the development of their home countries 1. Development Implications of International Migration Examples of “success stories” Taiwan, from brain drain to brain gain S. Korea, from country of origin to country of destination China and the overseas Chinese Role of the government in all three cases Return of scientific talent & entrepreneurs in Taiwan and S. (...) Development Implications of International Migration Labor migration (less skilled): brain gain? Vulnerability of migrants, esp. women migrants Unauthorized migration, inc. trafficking in human beings Return migration is a given Migration of the highly skilled: brain drain?
Language:English
Score: 971316.6 - https://www.un.org/en/developm...vents/pdf/other/turin/ASIS.pdf
Data Source: un
Brain development | UNICEF Parenting Skip to main content Parenting Toggle navigation Global Links Visit UNICEF Global High contrast Parenting QUICK LINKS About COVID-19 guide for parents Developmental milestones Mini parenting master classes Parenting inspiration Partners Sign up Main navigation Child Development Child Care Health Food and nutrition Search area has closed. (...) Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max 0B792406-3C90-48E8-AF22-4D48618D699F Created with sketchtool. Search results Brain development Video 06/29/2020 Toys for life 7 toys for babies and toddlers you can make at home Article 06/16/2020 Playtime, anytime! Turn everyday routines into fun playful moments for learning and brain development Article 06/15/2020 5 activities to develop a connection with your child Eat, play, love: Loving ways to help build your child’s brain Article 06/15/2020 5 fun ideas for learning through play Eat, play, love: Playful ways to help build your child’s brain Article 06/15/2020 5 creative ways to learn at mealtime Eat, play, love: How to help build your child’s brain Explainer 06/02/2020 Your toddler's developmental milestones at 2 years Everything you need to know about your growing 2-year-old Explainer 06/02/2020 Your toddler's developmental milestones at 18 months Everything you need to know about your growing 18-month-old Explainer 06/02/2020 Your toddler's developmental milestones at 1 year Everything you need to know about your growing 1-year-old Explainer 06/02/2020 Your baby's developmental milestones at 9 months Everything you need to know about your growing 9-month-old Explainer 06/02/2020 Your baby's developmental milestones at 6 months Everything you need to know about your growing 6-month-old Prev 1 1 2 Next Footer UNICEF Parenting Child development Developmental milestones Child care Food and nutrition Health COVID-19 guide for parents About UNICEF Parenting Discover more about UNICEF Where we work Take action for children Footer Secondary Contact us Legal Footer tertiary Report fraud, abuse, wrongdoing
Language:English
Score: 970300.7 - https://www.unicef.org/parenting/topics/brain-development-0
Data Source: un
“What’s the most important thing children have? It’s their brains. But we are not caring for children’s brains the way we care for their bodies – especially in early childhood, when the science shows that children’s brains and children’s futures are rapidly being shaped,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake. “We need to do more to give parents and caregivers of young children the support they need during this most critical period of brain development.”  The report also highlights that millions of children under five years old are spending their formative years in unsafe, unstimulating environments: Around 75 million children under-five live in areas affected by conflict, increasing their risk of toxic stress, which can inhibit brain cell connections in early childhood; Globally, poor nutrition, unhealthy environments and disease have left 155 million children under five stunted, which robs their bodies and brains from developing to their full potential; A quarter of all children between the ages of 2 and 4 years old in 64 countries do not take part in activities essential for brain development such as playing, reading and singing; Around 300 million children globally live in areas where the air is toxic, which emerging research shows can damage children’s developing brains. (...) “Policies that support early childhood development are a critical investment in the brains of our children, and thus in the citizens and workforce of tomorrow – and literally the future of the world,” said Lake.
Language:English
Score: 969808 - https://www.unicef.org/turkmen...-have-three-essential-national
Data Source: un
Danger in the Air: How air pollution can affect brain development in young children notes that breathing in particulate air pollution can damage brain tissue and undermine cognitive development – with lifelong implications and setbacks.  (...) The paper shows that air pollution, like inadequate nutrition and stimulation, and exposure to violence during the critical first 1,000 days of life, can impact children’s early childhood development by affecting their growing brains: Ultrafine pollution particles are so small that they can enter the blood stream, travel to the brain, and damage the blood-brain barrier, which can cause neuro-inflammation. (...) A young child’s brain is especially vulnerable because it can be damaged by a smaller dosage of toxic chemicals, compared to an adult’s brain.
Language:English
Score: 969808 - https://www.unicef.org/nepal/p...c-air-majority-live-south-asia
Data Source: un
Advances in neuroscience have proved that during the early years of life a child’s brain grows at an astounding rate which is never again repeated. (...) Incredibly, a child’s brain grows and develops to 85 per cent of its full capacity by the age of 5. (...) Each ‘masterclass’ is based on a key insight, including the fact that up to 75% of the energy derived from food goes toward brain development in under-fives, and that five minutes of play can spark 300,000 brain connections in young children.
Language:English
Score: 969808 - https://www.unicef.org/srilank...e-they-enter-adulthood-without
Data Source: un
These policies help parents better protect their children and provide them with better nutrition, play and early learning experiences in the crucial first years of life when the brain grows at a rate never to be repeated. The report notes that Cuba, France, Portugal, Russia and Sweden are among the countries that guarantee all three policies. (...) “What’s the most important thing children have? It’s their brains. But we are not caring for children’s brains the way we care for their bodies – especially in early childhood, when the science shows that children’s brains and children’s futures are rapidly being shaped,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake. “We need to do more to give parents and caregivers of young children the support they need during this most critical period of brain development.”  The report also highlights that millions of children under five years old are spending their formative years in unsafe, unstimulating environments: Around 75 million children under-five live in areas affected by conflict, increasing their risk of toxic stress, which can inhibit brain cell connections in early childhood; Globally, poor nutrition, unhealthy environments and disease have left 155 million children under five stunted, which robs their bodies and brains from developing to their full potential; A quarter of all children between the ages of 2 and 4 years old in 64 countries do not take part in activities essential for brain development such as playing, reading and singing; Around 300 million children globally live in areas where the air is toxic, which emerging research shows can damage children’s developing brains.
Language:English
Score: 968528.5 - https://www.unicef.org/eca/pre...onal-policies-support-families
Data Source: un
Brighter futures: Protecting early brain development through salt iodization notes that iodine deficiency is a leading cause of preventable brain damage worldwide. (...) “The nutrients a child receives in the earliest years of life influence their brain development for life, and can make or break their chance of a prosperous future,” said UNICEF Senior Nutrition Adviser Roland Kupka. (...) Nutrition – along with protection and stimulating activities like play and early learning – during a child’s first 1,000 days shape brain development for life. The report outlines urgent steps to reduce the risk of mental impairment to babies’ growing brains: Integrate salt iodization into national plans to support children’s nutrition and brain development in early childhood; Align salt iodization and salt reduction agendas; Establish surveillance systems to identify unreached populations; Strengthen regulatory systems to enforce existing legislation on salt iodization; Recognize the growing importance of fortified foods as potential sources of iodized salt.
Language:English
Score: 968292.6 - https://www.unicef.org/turkmen...ery-year-due-iodine-deficiency
Data Source: un
These processes and achievements demonstrate the relevance and effectiveness of the Global Code in Ireland. * The development of this policy brief has been funded by the European Union and NORAD “ Brain Drain to Brain Gain – Supporting WHO Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health personnel for Better Management of Health Worker Migration” project, coordinated by WHO and GHWA 1. (...) Policy developments in Ireland 2007 increase in number of medical school places 2013–2014 Strategic Review of Medical Training and Career Structures 2013 launch of International Medical Graduate Training Initiative 2014–2015 implementation & monitoring of Strategic Review Research developments in Ireland 2011–2014 Doctor Migration Project 2014 Failure to Retain Project 2014–2016 Doctor Emigration Project 2015–2017 Global Health Workforce Alliance Brain Drain to Brain Gain project Policy developments Internationally 2010 WHO Global Code adopted 2013 Third Global Forum on Human Resources for Health 2015 Review of WHO Global Code * The development of this policy brief has been funded by the European Union and NORAD “ Brain Drain to Brain Gain – Supporting WHO Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health personnel for Better Management of Health Worker Migration” project, coordinated by WHO and GHWA  2012. (...) We acknowledge our funders – the European Community FP7 and the Irish Health Research Board – and coordinators of the Brain Drain to Brain Gain: Supporting the WHO Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel for Better Management of Health Worker Migration project, based at the Global Health Workforce Alliance, World Health Organization.
Language:English
Score: 966655.7 - https://www.who.int/workforcea...igration_Ireland_clearance.pdf
Data Source: un
During their first three years of life, your child’s brain develops faster than at any other time! When children play, they are exploring their world and building critical skills that bring a lifetime of benefits.  (...) Video Building babies’ brains through play A Harvard professor's tips on how to boost your baby's brain development Watch now Article The science of play It’s not just fun – it’s fundamental to your child’s development Read the story Article How play strengthens your child’s mental health Playful moments are essential for your little one’s emotional well-being Read the story Video How babies learn through play Discover why play is so important for babies' development Watch now Page What is free play and why should you encourage it at home? (...) Just 15 minutes of play with your baby can spark millions of brain connections. Article Playtime, anytime! Turn everyday routines into fun playful moments for learning and brain development Read the story Article 5 fun ideas for learning through play Eat, play, love: Playful ways to help build your child’s brain Read the story Article Indoor play ideas to stimulate young children Safe fun and learning during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak Read the story Video Toys for life 7 toys for babies and toddlers you can make at home Watch now Article 3 fun ways to practice problem solving Play and learn together at home Read the story Article 10 playful activities for children with disabilities Fun at-home moments for learning Read the story Article 5 creative ways to learn at mealtime Eat, play, love: How to help build your child’s brain Read the story Article 5 activities to develop a connection with your child Eat, play, love: Loving ways to help build your child’s brain Read the story Looking for more ways to play?
Language:English
Score: 966028.2 - https://www.unicef.org/parenting/playbox
Data Source: un
These policies help parents better protect their children and provide them with better nutrition, play and early learning experiences in the crucial first years of life when the brain grows at a rate never to be repeated. The report notes that Cuba, France, Portugal, Russia and Sweden are among the countries that guarantee all three policies. (...) “What’s the most important thing children have? It’s their brains. But we are not caring for children’s brains the way we care for their bodies – especially in early childhood, when the science shows that children’s brains and children’s futures are rapidly being shaped,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake. “We need to do more to give parents and caregivers of young children the support they need during this most critical period of brain development.”  The report also highlights that millions of children under five years old are spending their formative years in unsafe, unstimulating environments: Around 75 million children under-five live in areas affected by conflict, increasing their risk of toxic stress, which can inhibit brain cell connections in early childhood; Globally, poor nutrition, unhealthy environments and disease have left 155 million children under five stunted, which robs their bodies and brains from developing to their full potential; A quarter of all children between the ages of 2 and 4 years old in 64 countries do not take part in activities essential for brain development such as playing, reading and singing; Around 300 million children globally live in areas where the air is toxic, which emerging research shows can damage children’s developing brains.
Language:English
Score: 965784 - https://www.unicef.org/press-r...onal-policies-support-families
Data Source: un