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Jordan © Credits Rabies Overview Rabies is a viral zoonotic disease that causes progressive and fatal inflammation of the brain and spinal cord. Clinically, it has two forms:  Furious rabies – characterized by hyperactivity and hallucinations. (...) In later states, the virus spreads to the central nervous system, causing fatal inflammation of the brain and spinal cord. The incubation period of the disease can vary from 1 week to 1 year, though it is typically 2–3 months.  (...) Muscles gradually become paralysed, starting at the site of the bite or scratch. A coma slowly develops and eventually death occurs. The paralytic form of rabies is often misdiagnosed, contributing to the under-reporting of the disease.   
Language:English
Score: 1130912.5 - https://www.who.int/health-topics/rabies
Data Source: un
People can be infected for years without knowing it – there may be no symptoms as the parasite reproduces inside the person, slowly damaging the heart, brain and intestines. Many people lose the ability to breathe easily and to walk, eventually dying of heart disease.
Language:English
Score: 1117460 - https://www.who.int/tdr/resear...s/ecohealth/chagas-bolivia/en/
Data Source: un
UNICEF/UNI318081/ Bhardwaj “I came to know that 90 per cent of a child’s brain development takes place in the first five years of their life and that spending time with my son will encourage him to imitate my actions, learn and develop,” he says.  With a better understanding of the depth of his role as a father, Ganesh said that little things of day-to-day life that had earlier missed his attention – like his son’s diet – slowly became a point of interest for him.  He listens closely to what the Anganwadi worker has to say about the importance of a nutritious diet, made of locally available produce, in the development of his child. 
Language:English
Score: 1117460 - https://www.unicef.org/india/s...urturing-loving-and-protecting
Data Source: un
CORE DOCUMENT FORMING PART OF THE REPORTS OF STATES PARTIES : FIJI
The growth rate has been dampened by high out-migration in recent years, an outflow predominantly of skilled workers and professionals and their families. This "brain drain" has had many repercussions, particularly on the staffing of schools and medical facilities and, perhaps ironically, on Fiji's unemployment problems, for the loss of skilled experienced workers erodes the basis for economic recovery. 4. (...) Although economic prospects may be improving, employment opportunities are growing more slowly than the potential labour force is expanding.
Language:English
Score: 1117240.2 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...en&DS=HRI/CORE/1/ADD.76&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
STATEMENT /SUBMITTED BY ASABE SHEHU YAR’ADUA FOUNDATION (ASYARF)
Women’s participation in the workforce should be supported more than ever before, so that it could slowly push countries up the age of retirement. At the same time, there should be an increase in recognition for international migration which can help to rejuvenate populations and slow the rate of population ageing. (...) In a child’s first 1000 days from conception to the second birthday, good nutrition enables optimal brain and immune system development and functioning, which, in turn, averts death and equips a child to grow, thrive, and reach his or her full potential.
Language:English
Score: 1117240.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...n&DS=E/CN.9/2021/NGO/17&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
FINAL RECORD OF THE 701ST PLENARY MEETING, HELD AT THE PALAIS DES NATIONS, GENEVA, ON THURSDAY, 9 MARCH 1995 : CONFERENCE ON DISARMAMENT
One of them looms large over this room today as we move slowly forward towards the deadline of next month. (...) For me personally, it has been six years of contact with the finest brains that one could ever come across. Some of them have sat on the same side of the table, others have been on the other side of the diplomatic divide.
Language:English
Score: 1095605.7 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...f/get?open&DS=CD/PV.701&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
“There’s amazing research showing that playing with your children boosts their brain development.” Engaging with older children Like younger children, teenagers seek praise and want to be thought of as good. (...) “Take five deep breaths, slowly and carefully and you'll notice you are able to respond in a calmer, more considered way. (...) Sign me up More parenting tips Page Coronavirus (COVID-19) guide for parents What you need to know to keep your loved ones safe Visit the page Article 5 activities to develop a connection with your child Eat, play, love: Loving ways to help build your child’s brain Read the story Article Protect your family’s mental health in the face of COVID-19 A conversation with psychology expert Dr.
Language:English
Score: 1086845.6 - https://www.unicef.org/parenti...ur-child-smart-and-healthy-way
Data Source: un
“There’s amazing research showing that playing with your children boosts their brain development.” Engaging with older children Like younger children, teenagers seek praise and want to be thought of as good. (...) “Take five deep breaths, slowly and carefully and you'll notice you are able to respond in a calmer, more considered way. (...) Turn everyday routines into fun playful moments for learning and brain development. Read the story Article How teens can protect their mental health during coronavirus 6 strategies for teens facing a new (temporary) normal.
Language:English
Score: 1086845.6 - https://www.unicef.org/turkey/...ur-child-smart-and-healthy-way
Data Source: un
Take a deep breath  – Breathe in slowly through your nose and out through your mouth. (...) Taking slow, intentional, belly breaths is one of the simplest and most effective things we can do to reduce anxiety, as it increases the supply of oxygen to our brains and helps to promote a sense of calm. Breathing too fast is common when experiencing anxiety, and it actually causes physical symptoms like tingling throughout the body which causes more anxiety. 
Language:English
Score: 1085733.6 - https://www.unicef.org/cambodi...s-young-people-feeling-anxious
Data Source: un
COMMUNICATION NO. 2044/2011 : DECISIONS/VIEWS
., the authors were taken to a psychiatric centre in order to examine their mental health; that, as a result of the authors’ medical examination, it was concluded that the second author had suffered damage to the scull and brain following a car accident, was slowly losing memory and suffered from post-traumatic encephalopathy, and the first author was diagnosed as having Bechterew’s disease and “borderline mental deviations against the background of a somatic illness”. 4.2 The State party further submits that, pursuant to article 270 of the Civil Procedure Code, a person may submit a complaint to a court within three months from the day he or she discovered that his or her rights and freedoms have been violated and within one month from the day when the person receives a decision in written form from a higher body or official refusing to satisfy the complaint, or within one month from the day when the one- month time limit has expired for the authorities to reply, if they have not replied to the person in written form. (...) The Committee also notes the State party’s response that the authors were taken to a psychiatric centre in order to examine their mental health; that, as a result of the medical examination, it was concluded that the second author had received damage to the scull and brain following a car accident, was slowly losing memory and suffered from post-traumatic encephalopathy; and that the first author had been diagnosed having Bechterew’s disease and “borderline mental deviations against the background of a somatic illness”. 7.7 The Committee notes that the authors challenge the validity of their medical diagnosis, while the State party upholds its correctness.
Language:English
Score: 1074635.6 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...=CCPR/C/116/D/2044/2011&Lang=E
Data Source: ods