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WORKING PAPER : BIOLOGICAL SAMPLE COLLECTION, PRESERVATION AND TRANSPORTATION / UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
• Take at least 30 grams of organs/tissues (human, post mortem x 3), place in a sterile container in individual, sealable mylar bags and refrigerate immediately; liver, spleen, lung, subcutaneous fat, kidney, heart and brain. • Collect at least two mediastinal lymph nodes post mortem. • Photographs and questionnaires should be employed where appropriate. (...) The use of sophisticated instruments on-site is not believed possible in the five to ten year timeframe, and development of simple "yes or no" tests for specific agents is progressing slowly. Overall, few significant changes are expected in this area in the five year and perhaps in the ten year timeframe which would make sampling simpler, cheaper, or more complete.
Language:English
Score: 981562.3 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...WC/CONF.III/VEREX/WP.57&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Every neural connection made during this critical window of brain development in early childhood forms the foundation for future neural connections, and ultimately influences the likelihood of healthy development of a child’s brain. (...) The impact of air pollution on the developing brain Air pollution potentially affects children’s brains through several mechanisms. (...) Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian, et al., ‘Air pollution, cognitive deficits and brain abnormalities: A pilot study with children and dogs’, Brain and Cognition, vol. 68, issue. 2, November 2008, pp.117-127. 12.
Language:English
Score: 981160.9 - https://www.unicef.org/sites/d...lo-media-Danger_in_the_Air.pdf
Data Source: un
Iceland joins forces with WHO to support an integrated approach to brain health Global Regions WHO Regional websites Africa Americas South-East Asia Europe Eastern Mediterranean Western Pacific When autocomplete results are available use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. (...) “The global burden of neurological conditions, which determine brain health, is very high, and contributes heavily to mortality and disability worldwide,” said Dr Tedros. (...) The brain health unit aims to achieve these goals by following a holistic person-centred approach that focusses on promotion, prevention, treatment, care and rehabilitation.
Language:English
Score: 980249.7 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...rated-approach-to-brain-health
Data Source: un
When the brain is deprived of blood and the oxygen it carries, or when bleeding inundates surrounding tissue and causes the brain to swell, its effective operation becomes compromised. (...) Most of the lifestyle-related risks can be reduced to prevent brain stroke. People who smoke should quit, and those who drink heavily should cease. (...) These simple but effective habits can help prevent brain stroke and other noncommunicable diseases such as heart disease and diabetes.
Language:English
Score: 978057.7 - https://www.who.int/southeasta...9-10-2016-prevent-brain-stroke
Data Source: un
Danger in the Air: How air pollution can affect brain development in young children notes that breathing in particulate air pollution can damage brain tissue and undermine cognitive development – with lifelong implications and setbacks.   “Not only do pollutants harm babies’ developing lungs – they can permanently damage their developing brains – and, thus, their futures,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake.  (...) The paper shows that air pollution, like inadequate nutrition and stimulation, and exposure to violence during the critical first 1,000 days of life, can impact children’s early childhood development by affecting their growing brains:   • Ultrafine pollution particles are so small that they can enter the blood stream, travel to the brain, and damage the blood-brain barrier, which can cause neuro-inflammation. • Some pollution particles, such as ultrafine magnetite, can enter the body through the olfactory nerve and the gut, and, due to their magnetic charge, create oxidative stress – which is known to cause neurodegenerative diseases. • Other types of pollution particles, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, can damage areas in the brain that are critical in helping neurons communicate, the foundation for children’s learning and development. • A young child’s brain is especially vulnerable because it can be damaged by a smaller dosage of toxic chemicals, compared to an adult’s brain.
Language:English
Score: 977957.5 - https://www.unicef.org/turkey/...ajority-live-south-asia-unicef
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Article 5 fun ideas for learning through play Eat, play, love: Playful ways to help build your child’s brain. by UNICEF UNICEF/UNI333166/ Bhardwaj For both babies and very young children, all important learning takes place within the context of play. (...) Provide a safe and nurturing environment for your curious child with these five fun tips for creative brain building.   UNICEF UNICEF UNICEF UNICEF UNICEF Related content Article 5 activities to develop a connection with your child Eat, play, love: Loving ways to help build your child’s brain Read the story Article 5 creative ways to learn at mealtime Eat, play, love: How to help build your child’s brain Read the story Video Building babies’ brains through play A Harvard professor's tips on how to boost your baby's brain development Watch now Video How babies learn through play Discover why play is so important for babies' development Watch now Footer UNICEF Parenting Child development Developmental milestones Child care Food and nutrition Health COVID-19 guide for parents About UNICEF Parenting Discover more about UNICEF Where we work Take action for children Footer Secondary Contact us Legal Footer tertiary Report fraud, abuse, wrongdoing
Language:English
Score: 976406.25 - https://www.unicef.org/parenti...deas-for-learning-through-play
Data Source: un
“What’s the most important thing children have? It’s their brains. But we are not caring for children’s brains the way we care for their bodies – especially in early childhood, when the science shows that children’s brains and children’s futures are rapidly being shaped,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake. “We need to do more to give parents and caregivers of young children the support they need during this most critical period of brain development.”    The report also highlights that millions of children under five years old are spending their formative years in unsafe, unstimulating environments:   ·        Around 75 million children under-five live in areas affected by conflict, increasing their risk of toxic stress, which can inhibit brain cell connections in early childhood; ·        Globally, poor nutrition, unhealthy environments and disease have left 155 million children under five stunted, which robs their bodies and brains from developing to their full potential; ·        A quarter of all children between the ages of 2 and 4 years old in 64 countries do not take part in activities essential for brain development such as playing, reading and singing; ·        Around 300 million children globally live in areas where the air is toxic, which emerging research shows can damage children’s developing brains. (...) “Policies that support early childhood development are a critical investment in the brains of our children, and thus in the citizens and workforce of tomorrow – and literally the future of the world,” said Lake.
Language:English
Score: 976026.4 - https://www.unicef.org/turkey/...onal-policies-support-families
Data Source: un
The lack of nutrients is not only taking its toll on the tiny body but also the brain. Most of the brain development is happening during the first 1000 days of a child’s life, starting inside mommy’s tummy. (...) The true value of playing is giving the brain some exercise. The same way a child needs to practice walking to learn how to get the balance right and not fall down every two seconds, the child needs to use its brain for it to develop. Crawling on all four making the sound of an engine while pushing a car forward might seem simple, but it is actually quite complex and triggers movement is several parts of the brain. If you start thinking of playing as brain exercise, you will immediately understand the importance.
Language:English
Score: 975766.7 - https://www.unicef.org/southsu...n/stories/playing-not-only-fun
Data Source: un
The spread of the virus early last year led to a lockdown in Thailand that started in March 2020 and was slowly eased, only to be followed by area-specific lockdowns where and when hotspots emerged. (...) The first six years of life are the most important for the child’s growth and lifelong learning as their brains develop most rapidly during this period. Any disruptions of play, stimulation and learning during this period will negatively impact a child’s development, said Kyungsun Kim, UNICEF Representative for Thailand.
Language:English
Score: 975006.4 - https://www.unicef.org/thailan...ng-magic-box-play-and-learning
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Press release Only 15 countries worldwide have three essential national policies that support families with young children – UNICEF New report says around 85 million children under five live in 32 countries that do not offer families three critical policies to support children’s early brain development. 21 September 2017 ЮНИСЕФ Available in: English русский NEW YORK/BISHKEK, 21 September 2017 – Only 15 countries worldwide have three basic national policies that help guarantee the time and resources parents need to support their young children’s healthy brain development, UNICEF said today in a new report. (...) It is essential to develop the children’s brain from early years, when their brain quickly forms,” says Yukie Mokuo, UNICEF Representative in Kyrgyzstan. (...) The report also highlights that millions of children under five years old are spending their formative years in unsafe, unstimulating environments: - Around 75 million children under-five live in areas affected by conflict, increasing their risk of toxic stress, which can inhibit brain cell connections in early childhood;   - Globally, poor nutrition, unhealthy environments and disease have left 155 million children under five stunted, which robs their bodies and brains from developing to their full potential;   - A quarter of all children between the ages of 2 and 4 years old in 64 countries do not take part in activities essential for brain development such as playing, reading and singing;  - Around 300 million children globally live in areas where the air is toxic, which emerging research shows can damage children’s developing brains.    
Language:English
Score: 973150.6 - https://www.unicef.org/kyrgyzs...onal-policies-support-families
Data Source: un