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Participants also expected enlargement to bring increased investment, especially in the services sector, thanks to increased funding from the EU, as well as the unification of rules and a safer business climate. 6. (...) 14. In order to increase competitiveness, participants felt that both government and business had to take action in a number of closely interrelated areas. 15. (...) A more successful Europe - Improved competitiveness of business - Business opportunity - Greater competition - Much more export to EU countries - Increasing effectiveness of economies of scale C.
Language:English
Score: 708185.2 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/trade/ctied9/trd_05_09e.pdf
Data Source: un
Participants also expected enlargement to bring increased investment, especially in the services sector, thanks to increased funding from the EU, as well as the unification of rules and a safer business climate. 6. (...) 14. In order to increase competitiveness, participants felt that both government and business had to take action in a number of closely interrelated areas. 15. (...) A more successful Europe · Improved competitiveness of business · Business opportunity · Greater competition · Much more export to EU countries · Increasing effectiveness of economies of scale C.
Language:English
Score: 708185.2 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DAM/trade/ctied9/trd_05_09e.doc
Data Source: un
Evidence Focused on Youth Tunisia (Premand et al, 2012): • Entrepreneurship track in final year of university provides business training and personalized coaching • Increases self-employment rates one year later (6% for males and 3% for females). • Channel: fostered business skills, expanded networks, and shaped behavioral skills. (...) Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bruhn and Zia, 2012): • Financial training increases knowledge for those with low financial literacy • Improves business performance and sales for those with high initial financial literacy. • Some improvements in business practices, but no increases in business profits or in business survival rates. (...) Impact: Microcredit Randomized evaluations usually find modest effects that vary across groups: • Hyderabad, India (Banerjee et al 2010) – Households behave differently • Entrepreneurs invest in durable assets • Non-entrepreneurs spend more on nondurable goods – 2nd wave (2013): business profits increase only for businesses above the 85th percentile • Morocco (Crepon et al 2011) – Similar to previous study, decrease in consumption to expand activities only in HHs with a pre-existing business • Philippines (Karlan and Zinman 2010) – Profits increase, but only for men – Effects stronger for higher-income entrepreneurs Not so good at creating entrepreneurs but rather supporting existing businesses (moderately).
Language:English
Score: 702059.77 - www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/grou...eetingdocument/wcms_237499.pdf
Data Source: un
Evidence Focused on Youth Tunisia (Premand et al, 2012): • Entrepreneurship track in final year of university provides business training and personalized coaching • Increases self-employment rates one year later (6% for males and 3% for females). • Channel: fostered business skills, expanded networks, and shaped behavioral skills. (...) Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bruhn and Zia, 2012): • Financial training increases knowledge for those with low financial literacy • Improves business performance and sales for those with high initial financial literacy. • Some improvements in business practices, but no increases in business profits or in business survival rates. (...) Impact: Microcredit Randomized evaluations usually find modest effects that vary across groups: • Hyderabad, India (Banerjee et al 2010) – Households behave differently • Entrepreneurs invest in durable assets • Non-entrepreneurs spend more on nondurable goods – 2nd wave (2013): business profits increase only for businesses above the 85th percentile • Morocco (Crepon et al 2011) – Similar to previous study, decrease in consumption to expand activities only in HHs with a pre-existing business • Philippines (Karlan and Zinman 2010) – Profits increase, but only for men – Effects stronger for higher-income entrepreneurs Not so good at creating entrepreneurs but rather supporting existing businesses (moderately).
Language:English
Score: 702059.77 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...eetingdocument/wcms_237499.pdf
Data Source: un
In particular, the ability to use mobile telephony services innovatively can enhance business performance by as much as 40 percent. Mobile telephony services enhance business performance • Mobile telephony services contribute to the acquisition of new customers, increase knowledge sharing within the micro-business, contribute to the reduction of information asymmetries and cost, and also increase operational flexibility, which all combine to enhance perceived business performance. – increasing operational flexibility by 32.4%. – reducing operational costs by 35.5 % – reducing information asymmetries by 30.0 % – On average, a MOM saves 2.8 business hours and 33.6 business kilometres per day by simply using mobile telephony services. (...) Or a 10% increase from 30 to 40% increases GDP by 1%. ITU/InfoDev Estimates %age increase in economic growth Countries with per 10% increase in penetration high incomes low incomes in: Fixed 0.4 0.7 Mobile 0.6 0.8 Internet 0.8 1.1 Broadband 1.2 1.4 Broadband: a platform for progress, June 2011 How reliable are the estimates? (...) Higher marginal GDP tax rate 0 + +, increases; -, decreases; 0, no effect; ?, ambiguous.
Language:English
Score: 700764.36 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/fina...Taxation/pdf/Cave-Session3.pdf
Data Source: un
Increasing prosperity, a major goal of the development process, is contributed primarily by the activities of business and industry. (...) The need for a transition towards cleaner production policies was recognized at the UNIDO-organized ministerial-level Conference on Ecologically Sustainable Industrial Development, held at Copenhagen in October 1991. 1/ Objectives 30.6. Governments, business and industry, including transnational corporations, should aim to increase the efficiency of resource utilization, including increasing the reuse and recycling of residues, and to reduce the quantity of waste discharge per unit of economic output. (...) Towards this end, business and industry should increase self-regulation, guided by appropriate codes, charters and initiatives integrated into all elements of business planning and decision-making, and fostering openness and dialogue with employees and the public. 30.27.
Language:English
Score: 698965.7 - https://www.un.org/esa/dsd/agenda21/res_agenda21_30.shtml
Data Source: un
There may also be an increase in heating costs for terminals and other infrastructure. (...) Desertification:  An increase in dust storms could increase the presence of silicates in jet engines, which, when melted, can adversely affect the performance and increase maintenance requirements of jet engines. (...) Changes in biodiversity:  There may be an increase in both costs for wildlife management and costs from wildlife damage to aircraft (e.g. from bird strikes).  There may also be damage to landscaping and an increase in maintenance costs due to changes in local wildlife or an increase in invasive species.
Language:English
Score: 698016.75 - https://www.icao.int/environme...%20and%20Economics%20Final.pdf
Data Source: un
How to Increase Gender Balance in Boardrooms | UN Global Compact All Participants Search Who We Are The SDGs Participation Take Action Engage Locally Explore Our Library About News Sign In Contact Us How to Increase Gender Balance in Boardrooms In this section UN Global Compact Academy COVID-19: Sustainable Finance and the Future of the Global Economy Decent Work in Global Supply Chains COVID-19 and Supporting the World of Work Climate Action: Uniting Business and Governments to Recover Better Regional Perspectives on Leadership in a Global Crisis SDG Action Manager Eliminating Harassment and Violence in the World of Work Threats to Critical Global Ocean Supply Chains: Shipping During COVID-19 Global Cooperation for Crisis Response Briefing on Private Sector Engagement in the UN Climate Action Summit COVID-19 and Human Rights: Protecting the Most Vulnerable How to Set Science-Based Target Stay Connected with the Academy What Human Rights mean for Business Taking a Principles-based Approach to the Global Goals COVID-19: How Business Can Support Women in Times of Crisis Helping Small Businesses Survive COVID-19 Accountability, Integrity and Transparency in Times of Crisis New Leadership for a Global Crisis: COVID-19 How to Set Ambitious Corporate Targets and Accelerate Integration of the 17 SDGs Family Friendly Policies How to Increase Gender Balance in Boardrooms The Value of Water for Business How to Improve Safety and Health in Global Supply Chains SDG Ambition Live Q&A How Business can Deliver Health Resilient Climate Action How to Advance Women’s Leadership in Climate Action Delivering on Net-Positive Water Impact for Growth and Resilience Understanding and Promoting Living Wage in Latin America How to Ensure a Living Wage for All Employees, Globally and Regionally FAQ How to Increase Gender Balance in Boardrooms Research shows that increasing women’s representation on corporate boards improves business outcomes in multiple ways, ranging from increased revenues and profits to strengthened ESG performances. (...) During this session, you will learn: -Why board diversity is critical to business performance and sustainability -How to set, meet and stay accountable to ambitious targets -How increased government and investor expectations, as well as stock exchange listing requirements, are incentivizing business to prioritize board diversity -Diverse examples of strategies that companies have adopted to secure parity on boards and ensure that women’s perspectives are equally valued in decision-making Speakers Include: Moderator: Melsa Ararat, Board Member, Global Compact Network Turkey; Director, Sabanci University Corporate Governance Forum; Global Advisory Board Member, 30% Club  Ann Dennison, Senior Vice President and incoming CFO, Nasdaq Irene Natividad, Chair, Corporate Women Directors International Jeremy Awori, CEO, Absa Bank Kenya Loty Salazar, Lead, Women on Boards and in Business Leadership, IFC What we learned:  The business case for women's representation and leadership, including at the board level, is well established. (...) Women's representation in decision-making roles across all sectors is essential to effectively respond and recover from the COVID-19 pandemic. Businesses, governments, investors, stock exchanges and others all have a role to play and must work together to raise the bar and increase accountability for progress. 
Language:English
Score: 697800.9 - https://www.unglobalcompact.or...e-gender-balance-in-boardrooms
Data Source: un
Microfinance Institution Country Innovation Summary Main Results Child labour LAPO Nigeria Awareness campaign against child labour and the introduction of a loan for school associated expenses Marginal impact on school attendance for clients exposed to awareness campaign NRSP Pakistan Modification to existing health insurance product to extend coverage to all household members Decrease of child labour by 7%, reduction of hazardous occupations, reduction of average hours worked Nyèsigiso Mali Client training using adapted ILO WIND, GERME and child labour training materials Incidence of child labour decreased by 26% for girls Risk Management & Over-indebtedness AMK Cambodia Financial education for clients (indirect approach through educating loan officers) Reduction in late repayments, 10% increase in insurance uptake and better financial attitude towards savings Banco Popular Honduras Introduction of health insurance product and client training N/A: endline could not be conducted due to delays in implementation of new product Financiera Confianza Peru Introduction of micro-insurance product “multiriesgo de Confianza” and client training on product and use Positive impact on multiple borrowing/over-indebtedness (28% lower outstanding balance). Positive income effect of 170 USD NWTF (1) Philippines Introduction of new entrepreneurship training for clients using ILO training modules “Generate Your Business” (GYB) and “Start Your Business” (SYB) 13% reduction in perception of lower barriers to entrepreneurship, increased business profits by 50 USD, reduction in late repayments NWTF (2) Philippines Modification of a savings products for emergency purposes (Individual Emergency Fund) Strong reduction of cross borrowing (22% reduction in taking out loan to repay another one) and decrease of repayment difficulties PRIDE Uganda Introduction of new leasing product (Mortgage Asset Financing Loan) Due to methodological issues, Before-After analysis was conducted: Increased assets and better coverage of business and household expenses TYM Viet Nam Introduction of client training on risk management and microinsurance Decrease of negative attitude towards book keeping, increase attitude towards savings and 22% increase in ability to put money aside for emergencies VisionFund Cambodia Financial education for clients (direct training of clients) Decrease of negative perceptions towards insurance, 22% increase in ability to put money aside for emergencies, improved attitude towards savings Formalization ESAF India Awareness raising on formalization and introduction of Business Development Services (BDS) to clients 70% increase in business registration, 15% increase in maintaining books of accounts, increased awareness about government support schemes FCPB Burkina Faso Introduction of sensitization to benefits of formalization, combined with training on enterprise management and client incentives to formalize 26% improvement on business practices, increased number of clients separating business and personal accounts and increased awareness about the importance of social protection Working Conditions BASIX India Introduction of Participatory Safety Education to increase productivity and workplace safety of clients and community 11% Decrease in work place illness and injuries, better work safe habits, reduced average daily work hours and increased monthly income by 37 USD Tamweelcom Jordan Awareness raising on working conditions to clients and community, combined with client and staff trainings using adapted ILO WISE methodology (Work Improvement for Small Entreprises) Before-After analysis: Improvements related to material storage and handling, higher levels of production Job Creation Bai Tushum & Partners Kyrgyzstan Organizational restructuring of microfinance section and SME section offering different sets of products Job creation amongst clients (from 92% of clients to almost 100%) IMON Tajikistan Introduction of entrepreneurship training for women clients Broad implementation of business ideas into practices (258 out of 487 women), majority of women started their business within 3 months Tags: child labour, decent work, employment creation, income generating activities, child workers, working conditions, poverty, savings, microenterprises, informal economy, credit, microfinance, social finance, research, data analysis, data collecting, survey, finance Regions and countries covered: Uganda, Burkina Faso, Mali, Nigeria, Honduras, Peru, Jordan, Cambodia, India, Pakistan, Philippines, Viet Nam, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan Tools A A+ A++ Print Share this content in Microfinance for Decent Work: Action Research Key resources Microfinance for Decent Work – Enhancing the impact of microfinance: Evidence from an action research programme [pdf 6183KB] MF4DW individual impact assessments See also Project documentations Talking about MF4DW Presenting MF4DW Newsflashes from MF4DW © 1996-2022 International Labour Organization (ILO) | Copyright and permissions  | Privacy policy | Fraud alert | Disclaimer   Skip to top
Language:English
Score: 697363.3 - https://www.ilo.org/empent/are...WCMS_168044/lang--en/index.htm
Data Source: un
Growth of mining sector was 30.8% and energy sector reached 6.3% of increase in the 2004. End year inflation was 11% and transferred to two digit number due to external factors such as oil price increase in the Russian market, the price of imported diesel fuel and petrol sharply increased in the second half of 2004 and domestic consumption price went up following the petrol price increase. (...) TENTATIVE PROGRAM ON E-COMMERCE IN MONGOLIA: The main purpose: To increase competitiveness of business entities through the main advantage of e-commerce that creates a new environment where traders do business irrelevant of location and time. Targets: · To create access to e-commerce for the capital city, all centers of aimags, and 70% of all somons (administrative units) by year of 2012. · To increase business volume of B2B (business to business) by 10% and of B2C (business to consumer) by 20%. · To make the e-commerce as a main tool for increase foreign trade turnover Actions: · to build a basement for the –commerce: · legal environment · information security · e-contract · e-signature · e-changes in related documents · credit history · to elaborate information data base and information management system · to create integrated information data base that can be easily accessed by all stakeholders · to create monitoring system of e-commerce · to promote e-transaction between Mongolian financial institutions and business entities · to join international e-commerce alliances and to participate in international e-commerce · to promote cross border e-commerce FROM ASYCUDA TO GAMAS The ASYCUDA system was initially introduced in 1993 and it was used in 12 different customs offices and posts of the country.
Language:English
Score: 694800.6 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DA.../mongolia_country_overview.doc
Data Source: un