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Start of helpnet for the vehicles June Start of helpnet for cell-phones Sept. July New system 7 dates ITU-T The Fully Networked Car, A Workshop on ICT in Vehicles ITU-T Geneva, 2-4 March 2005 The in-vehicle units and the cell- phones eating 6% others 16% working 27% house keeping 15% walking 2% moving by car 4% sleeping 30% Average lifestyle of the Japanese Average lifestyle of the Japanese The traffic of calls from cell phones to HELPNET has been increasing. Grouping of HELPNET units Grouping of HELPNET units built-in type with air bag sensor Car navigation type Cell-phone type with GPS-receiver Outside the vehicle In the vehicle General purpose Dedicated purpose 8 dates ITU-T The Fully Networked Car, A Workshop on ICT in Vehicles ITU-T Geneva, 2-4 March 2005 Data1(id, position) Report to the agencies police/fire O rder O rder GPSCell-phone Network Cell-phone Network Air-bag deployment The vehicle w/ HELPNET Mechanism of HelpnetMechanism of Helpnet Voice2 Data and/or Fax Fax (map of accident site) Data1(id, position) Voice2 reporterreporter HELPNET Operation Center HELPNET Operation Center Voice1 Police / Fire department Police / Fire department Data2#1 Voice3 (direct talk) Sequential flow of HelpnetSequential flow of Helpnet The operator can easily select a proper organization based on information from the trouble site. (...) Fire department The instance of traffic accident Effects of introducing HELPNET 12 dates ITU-T The Fully Networked Car, A Workshop on ICT in Vehicles ITU-T Geneva, 2-4 March 2005 Members of the vehicle-type -> 3,100Members of the vehicle-type -> 3,100 Members of the cell-phone type-> 57,815Members of the cell-phone type-> 57,815 Emergency calls from the vehicle type Emergency calls from the vehicle type C 40.9% H 2.8%G 2.3% E 8.4% D 3.3% A 14.4% B 25.1% F 2.8% C 53.8% D 4.5% E 15.3% G 12.4% A 2.5% B 8.5% F 3.0% Cell-phonevehicle A: Traffic accident resulting in injuries or deaths B: Traffic accident without injuries or deaths C: Roadside assistance D: Incident E: Hospital information F: Wrong or prank calls G: Sudden illness H: Others Emergency calls for the cell-phone type Emergency calls for the cell-phone type As of end of Nov., 2004As of end of Nov., 2004 Emergency calls from the HELPNET members 13 dates ITU-T The Fully Networked Car, A Workshop on ICT in Vehicles ITU-T Geneva, 2-4 March 2005 Effects of the HELP o Shorten notification time o Grasp the accurate position information o Shorten arrival time o Improve the life saving rate o Prevent secondary disasters 14 dates ITU-T The Fully Networked Car, A Workshop on ICT in Vehicles ITU-T Geneva, 2-4 March 2005 Future o Increase the number of units (vehicle type and cell-phone type) o Coordination with other systems (ex.
Language:English
Score: 1460944.5 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/work...03/presentations/s4-morita.pdf
Data Source: un
Sharma is co-ordinating and conducting a hospital based multi-disciplinary cohort study in Delhi & NCR to find out the adverse effects of radiation emitted from cell phone on adult Indian population. This is a largest epidemiological study going on in the Country. (...) Member – Expert Committee for installation of cell phone towers in Delhi, Municipal Corporation of Delhi (MCD), Govt. of Delhi, Delhi. 4. (...) As a prominent member of the Inter-Ministerial Committee of Ministry of Communication and IT, Govt. of India played a significant role in a. reducing exposure limit of Radio Frequency Radiation (RFR) to 1/10th of the existing one, emitted from cell phone tower in the Country. b. reducing the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of cell phone. c. developed guidelines for safe use of cell phone by the users in the Country. d. developed guidelines for installation of cell phone towers in the Country. e.
Language:English
Score: 1454804.2 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/W...rs/Documents/Bio_RS_Sharma.doc
Data Source: un
This is a lot of useful information, but it pertains to people who have cell phones and use them. Such data cannot say anything about people without cell phones, or those with phones who never use them. (...) By adding a detailed ‘cell phone module’ to ongoing HDSS data collection it will be possible to understand cell phone ownership and usage in detail in addition to all of the other detailed information describing the HDSS study populations. Then by combining all of this with cell phone call metadata that includes the cell phones used by the HDSS study population, it will be possible to characterize and understand the biases and omissions inherent in the cell phone call metadata, and that understanding can be used to de-bias, calibrate and adjust indicator values produced using cell phone call metadata that describe very large populations that are similar to the HDSS study population. 5 Although we have used cell phone call metadata as an example, this general approach should work for any type of big data, social network data, satellite imagery, etc.
Language:English
Score: 1451969 - https://www.un.org/development...510_egm-s4-samuel_j._clark.pdf
Data Source: un
Sharma is co-ordinating and conducting a hospital based multi-disciplinary cohort study in Delhi & NCR to find out the adverse effects of radiation emitted from cell phone on adult Indian population. This is a largest epidemiological study going on in the Country. (...) Member – Expert Committee for installation of cell phone towers in Delhi, Municipal Corporation of Delhi (MCD), Govt. of Delhi, Delhi. 4. (...) As a prominent member of the Inter-Ministerial Committee of Ministry of Communication and IT, Govt. of India played a significant role in a. reducing exposure limit of Radio Frequency Radiation (RFR) to 1/10th of the existing one, emitted from cell phone tower in the Country. b. reducing the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of cell phone. c. developed guidelines for safe use of cell phone by the users in the Country. d. developed guidelines for installation of cell phone towers in the Country. e.
Language:English
Score: 1444045.6 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/W...911/Documents/RS_Sharma_CV.pdf
Data Source: un
This is the first generation to have direct access to high technology. Cell phones today are nearly ubiquitous in African society. (...) Cell phones are central to life.” Youth are using mobile phones for everything: communicating, listening to the radio, transferring money, shopping, mingling on social media and more. (...) In his country, South Africa, 72% of those between the ages of 15 and 24 have cell phones, according to the UN Children’s Fund, UNICEF. 
Language:English
Score: 1439331 - https://www.un.org/africarenew...%99s-mobile-youth-drive-change
Data Source: un
The only exception is the 6 – 12 age bracket, where computer usage is approximately 37% higher than cell phone usage. Cell phone usage is over 90% in the 20 – 49 age bracket, and still around 50% in the 65 – 69 age group. (...) Viewed by gender, city size and household income, the difference in usage rates was greater for computers than for cell phones. As household income rises, the discrepancy between computer and cell phone usage narrows. (...) Impact of demographic factors on cell phone and computer usage (householders) Range Cell phones Computers Gender 0.10 0.41 Age 2.80 2.57 City size 0.09 0.33 Household income 0.68 1.28 12 (3) Ownership of telecommunications devices (households) Cell phones are owned by 89.6% of households and computers by 80.5%.
Language:English
Score: 1433794.9 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/ict/...0Mr.OKABE(JAPAN)APPENDIX_1.pdf
Data Source: un
Common Sense Media | 2 In 1983, the first cell phones weighed 28 ounces, measured 10 inches high, and sold for thousands of dollars. (...) One sign of this change is the growth of mobile applications – 2.3 billion apps were downloaded in the past year alone, and more than five billion will be downloaded per year by 2014.5 3 | Common Sense Media In 2004, 45% of teens had a cell phone; by 2009, it was 75%.6 The fastest growth has been among younger teens: In 2004, just 18% of 12 year olds had a cell phone, compared to 64% of 17 year olds. • In 2009, 58% of 12 year olds had a cell phone, compared to 83% of 17 year olds.• 7 Mobile phone usage is also growing rapidly among younger children. (...) Kids who sext may face criminal charges for child pornography or other violations, • and could be required to register as sex offenders.21 Distracted Driving In 2007, AAA reported that 21% of fatal car crashes involving teens between the ages of 16 and 19 were the result of cell phone usage. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, in 2008 there were 5,870 fatalities and an estimated 515,000 injuries in police-reported crashes involving driver distraction, and the highest incidence of distracted driving occurs in the under- 20 age group. 22 34% of texting teens ages 16-17 say they have texted while driving. • 52% of cell-owning teens ages 16-17 say they have talked on a phone while driving.• 23 Common Sense Media | 8 Cheating More than 35% of teens with cell phones admit to using their cell phones to cheat.
Language:English
Score: 1429735 - https://www.itu.int/council/gr...tPhonesSmartKidsWhitePaper.pdf
Data Source: un
There she shows the agent her identity card and her cell phone, which displays a PIN number provided by a client. (...) Holders of Wizzit accounts can use any cell phone, even the cheap, old models popular in low-income communities. (...) In South Africa, First National Bank also partners with cell phone provider Mobile Telephone Networks (MTN), which provides services for South Africans who already have a bank account but also want to send and receive money over cell phones.
Language:English
Score: 1429412.4 - https://www.un.org/africarenew...2008/bank-every-african-pocket
Data Source: un
Cell phones revolutionizing Kenya’s livestock sector Discover About FAO In action Media Main topics Resources Member countries Get involved English العربية 中文 Français Русский Español Italiano About FAO Loading... (...) Publications Loading... Share × Close Cell phones revolutionizing Kenya’s livestock sector Mobile phones send first alerts for livestock diseases, and Web access by cell phone means endless innovations are improving Kenya’s livestock industry by leaps and bounds Traders at the livestock market in Garissa, Kenya ©Photo: ©FAO/Thomas Hug 01/03/2013 1 March 2013, Rome - Farmers and veterinarians across Africa are increasingly using cell phones to issue alerts quickly about possible animal disease outbreaks at a very early stage and to track wide-scale vaccination campaigns. Mobile phone applications are making ‘early warning’ a matter of seconds instead of weeks for animal disease outbreaks, and essential veterinary care can be tracked with pinpoint accuracy and speed, thanks to the Global Positioning System function now directly integrated in most cell phones.
Language:English
Score: 1429405.3 - https://www.fao.org/newsroom/d...ng-Kenya-s-livestock-sector/en
Data Source: un
Ecuador has enacted Ministerial Agreement No. 191, which instructs the management of discarded cell phones. The agreement sets a target to collect 3 per cent of discarded cell phones and creates control mechanisms for importers and managers of these devices. (RECICLAMETAL, 2014) The instructions are derived from the policy set out in the Ministerial Agreement No. 190, as disused cell phones are a part of the e-waste stream. For the specific case of obsolete handsets, besides the Ministerial Agreement No. 191, the country has regulations established by the Committee of Foreign Trade (COMEX), issued as follows: • Through Resolution No. 067 of June 2012, COMEX restricts the import of cell phones by quotas, which were distributed among 33 importers as determined in Annex I of the Resolution. • The MEE established a cell phone recycling policy which suggests a recycling rate for calculating the quota in addition to the normal quota set out in the Resolution. • Through Resolution No. 69 of July 2012, COMEX replaces Annex I of Resolution No.67, recalculating the annual import quotas. • Through Resolution No. 100 of December 2012, COMEX sets the maximum additional quota that can be accessed by the importer at a rate of a 2.5 to 1. (...) Likewise, they are required to report to MEE each month on the amounts of unused and collected cell phones that are handed over to the managers, who also forward a monthly statement of management. 20 Sustainable management of waste electrical and electronic equipment in Latin America     25     26     27     28     29     30     31     32     33     34     35          
Language:English
Score: 1428329.8 - https://www.itu.int/wftp3/Publ...t/files/basic-html/page30.html
Data Source: un