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Ecuador has enacted Ministerial Agreement No. 191, which instructs the management of discarded cell phones. The agreement sets a target to collect 3 per cent of discarded cell phones and creates control mechanisms for importers and managers of these devices. (RECICLAMETAL, 2014) The instructions are derived from the policy set out in the Ministerial Agreement No. 190, as disused cell phones are a part of the e-waste stream. For the specific case of obsolete handsets, besides the Ministerial Agreement No. 191, the country has regulations established by the Committee of Foreign Trade (COMEX), issued as follows: • Through Resolution No. 067 of June 2012, COMEX restricts the import of cell phones by quotas, which were distributed among 33 importers as determined in Annex I of the Resolution. • The MEE established a cell phone recycling policy which suggests a recycling rate for calculating the quota in addition to the normal quota set out in the Resolution. • Through Resolution No. 69 of July 2012, COMEX replaces Annex I of Resolution No.67, recalculating the annual import quotas. • Through Resolution No. 100 of December 2012, COMEX sets the maximum additional quota that can be accessed by the importer at a rate of a 2.5 to 1. (...) Likewise, they are required to report to MEE each month on the amounts of unused and collected cell phones that are handed over to the managers, who also forward a monthly statement of management. 20 Sustainable management of waste electrical and electronic equipment in Latin America     25     26     27     28     29     30     31     32     33     34     35          
Language:English
Score: 1425606.25 - https://www.itu.int/wftp3/Publ...t/files/basic-html/page30.html
Data Source: un
Ecuador has enacted Ministerial Agreement No. 191, which instructs the management of discarded cell phones. The agreement sets a target to collect 3 per cent of discarded cell phones and creates control mechanisms for importers and managers of these devices. (RECICLAMETAL, 2014) The instructions are derived from the policy set out in the Ministerial Agreement No. 190, as disused cell phones are a part of the e-waste stream. For the specific case of obsolete handsets, besides the Ministerial Agreement No. 191, the country has regulations established by the Committee of Foreign Trade (COMEX), issued as follows: • Through Resolution No. 067 of June 2012, COMEX restricts the import of cell phones by quotas, which were distributed among 33 importers as determined in Annex I of the Resolution. • The MEE established a cell phone recycling policy which suggests a recycling rate for calculating the quota in addition to the normal quota set out in the Resolution. • Through Resolution No. 69 of July 2012, COMEX replaces Annex I of Resolution No.67, recalculating the annual import quotas. • Through Resolution No. 100 of December 2012, COMEX sets the maximum additional quota that can be accessed by the importer at a rate of a 2.5 to 1. (...) Likewise, they are required to report to MEE each month on the amounts of unused and collected cell phones that are handed over to the managers, who also forward a monthly statement of management. 20 Sustainable management of waste electrical and electronic equipment in Latin America     25     26     27     28     29     30     31     32     33     34     35          
Language:English
Score: 1425606.25 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica...t/files/basic-html/page30.html
Data Source: un
For example, one “shipment” or consignment could be a single replacement battery for a notebook computer or cellular phone or a pallet consisting of 20,000 lithium ion cells. (...) The two leading consumer products that utilize lithium ion cells and batteries are cellular phones and notebook computers (NBPC). (...) A typical lithium ion battery pack for a notebook computer has inside it between five and nine lithium ion cells. In contrast, cellular phone batteries contain a single lithium ion cell.
Language:English
Score: 1424562.3 - https://www.icao.int/safety/Da...s201/DGPWGLB.1.IP.001.6.en.pdf
Data Source: un
0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% No Yes P er ce nt Male Female International Telecommunication Union 19 Few significant age differences 1) Cell phone functionality • Most people use their phones to play games • Those in the 15-17 yr old & the 18-20 yr old age brackets have significant association with sending pictures /playing games • Interesting: Gaming is most popular! (...) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% No, never Seldom Sometimes Often Yes, always Male Female Is your cell phone always on? 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% No Yes Male Female International Telecommunication Union 24 Areas with of interest (but little significant gender/age difference) Do you always answer your cell phone when it rings? 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% No Yes Female Male Are you aware that certain companies have information about the location of your cell phone? 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% No Yes Pe rc en t Male Female International Telecommunication Union 25 www.itu.int/futuremobile International Telecommunication Union 26 tks!
Language:English
Score: 1414516.6 - https://www.itu.int/osg/spu/ni.../srivastava_youth_original.pdf
Data Source: un
For example, by only counting the total number of phone calls that each cell tower is handling or the number of phones that move between towers. (...) Sept 2014 [8]"Researchers use cell-phone data, not precogs, to predict crime in London" Engadget. (...) Pentland 16th ACM International Conference on Multimodal Interaction (ICMI 2014) [11]"Flooding through the Lens of Mobile Phone Activity" Pastor-Escuredo, D., Torres Fernandez, Y., Bauer, J.M., Wadhwa, A., Castro-Correa, C., Romanoff, L., Lee, J.G., Rutherford, A., Frias-Martinez, V., Oliver, N., Frias-Martinez, E. and Luengo-Oroz, M. http://techcrunch.com/2014/11/08/using-big-data-to-fight-pandemics/ http://www.bbc.com/news/business-29617831 http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2013-10/17/nuria-oliver http://www.wired.com/ http://www.theguardian.com/media-network/media-network-blog/2013/sep/05/combating-epidemics-big-mobile-data http://www.theguardian.com/uk http://motherboard.vice.com/read/mobile-phone-data-can-help-predict-crime-a-month-in-advance http://www.gizmodo.co.uk/2014/09/mobile-data-could-be-used-to-help-predict-where-crimes-about-to-happen/ http://www.engadget.com/2014/09/18/london-crime-prediction/ http://arxiv.org/pdf/1409.2983.pdf http://icmi.acm.org/2014/ [12]Younes Moumny, Vanessa Frias-Martinez and Enrique Frias-Martinez, "Characterizing Social Response to Urban Earthquakes using Cell-Phone Network Data: The 2012 Oaxaca Earthquake", Third Workshop on Pervasive Urban Applications @Pervasive'13, Zurich,Switzerland 2013. [13]Enrique Frias-Martinez, Graham Williamson and Vanessa Frias-Martinez, "Simulation of Epidemic Spread Using Cell Phone Call Data: H1N1 Case Study", NetMob 2013 (Poster). [14]Vanessa Frias-Martinez, Alberto Rubio and Enrique Frias-Martinez, "Measuring the Impact of Epidemic Alerts on Human Mobility using Cell-Phone Network Data", Second Workshop on Pervasive Urban Applications @Pervasive'12, Newcastle, UK, 2012. [15] Vanessa Frias-Martinez, Cristina Soguero, Malvina Josephidou and Enrique Frias-Martinez, "Forecasting Socioeconomic Trends With Cell Phone Records", 3rd ACM Symposium on Computing for Development, DEV'13, Bangalore, India, 2013. [16] Enabling Humanitarian Use of Mobile Phone Data Montjoye, Y.A., Kendall, J. and Kerry, C.
Language:English
Score: 1412156.9 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/S...s/events/wtis2014/003INF-E.pdf
Data Source: un
Abstract of contribution for “The development of voice service platform by DSR” Hidenori Oda, KDDI Corporation, Japan TEL: +81-3-6678-5104; E-mail: hi-oda@kddi.com Eiji Utsunomiya, KDDI Corporation, Japan TEL: +81-3-6678-2522; E-mail: ei-utsunomiya@kddi.com Tohru Shimizu, KDDI Laboratories, Japan TEL: +81-49-278-7383; E-mail: tr-shimizu@kddi.com KDDI corp., a cell phone network operator in Japan, has been working for the communication services under mobile environment. KDDI is also working for the development for the future telematics services over cell phone network. KDDI is now developing a common platform for car drivers and cell phone users to provide mobile information services based on speech recognition technology, as we believe the user-friendly HMI is a key element for the growth of mobile services including motor vehicles. One of our current efforts to provide such services, is the development of the voice service platform based on distributed speech recognition (DSR), as this technology provides the following merits compared to the conventional speech recognition over cell phone network: - Resilience to intermittent errors due to mobile circumstances - Multi-modal access using both voice and data - Lower bandwidth To explore and evaluate the possibilities of DSR, we are conducting on the experiment using IP technologies such as XML and Web browser based multi-model DSR client and DSR recognition server.
Language:English
Score: 1409695.6 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/work...act/telecomo_1103_s3p6_abs.doc
Data Source: un
They can help each other in cell tower information for locating users because the a crowded and occluded (e.g., by walls and other types identifier of a user’s phone needs to be accessed. (...) For example, when Since a phone has to connect with cell towers in order to there is no proximity measurement from ultrasound and send and receive data through cellular network, it con- the WiFi proximity indicates encounters are in different stantly searches nearby cell towers and initiates connec- rooms, the infection risk can be adjusted to a low level. tions during movements. In each established connection, Besides the above privacy-preserving data collection a cell tower not only knows which phone is trying (each methods, we can also apply tools from the field of differ- phone has a unique identifier) to connect at which time, ential privacy [8].
Language:English
Score: 1402734.6 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica.../files/basic-html/page112.html
Data Source: un
"A horseman and his phone-cell during the Moussem of Tan Tan, a festival of noma"^^ . "A horseman and his phone-cell during the Moussem of Tan Tan, a festival of nomad tribes -"^^ . (...) "A horseman and his phone-cell during the Moussem of Tan Tan, a festival of noma (Image)"^^ .
Language:English
Score: 1399222.3 - https://en.unesco.org/mediaban...DFNT/mediabank-eprint-15981.nt
Data Source: un
A typical example is the case where a cell phone user uses his cell phone, which contains both an ID terminal and an ID tag, to read an identifier and application data from other cell phones. For example, one of two movie tickets, which a man bought and of which associated data was stored in his cell phone, could be transferred to a cellular phone of his girl friend.
Language:English
Score: 1396931.4 - https://www.itu.int/wftp3/Publ.../files/basic-html/page258.html
Data Source: un
relation: http://en.unesco.org/mediabank/15981/ title: A horseman and his phone-cell during the Moussem of Tan Tan, a festival of noma creator: Ravassard, Michel subject: Culture subject: Cultural Diversity description: A horseman and his phone-cell during the Moussem of Tan Tan, a festival of nomad tribes - date: 2004 type: Image type: NonPeerReviewed format: image language: none rights: cc_by_sa_3_igo identifier: http://en.unesco.org/mediabank/15981/1/10035361.jpg identifier: A horseman and his phone-cell during the Moussem of Tan Tan, a festival of noma.
Language:English
Score: 1396185.5 - https://en.unesco.org/mediaban.../DC/mediabank-eprint-15981.txt
Data Source: un