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The results of different LMU are compared to determine the most likely location of the phone. Under optimal conditions, where there is more density of base stations, U‐TDOA technology locates mobile phones within a radius of 50 meters. (...) It is also the method of locating cell phones that has focused on security more precisely. Also the U‐TDOA location technology is typically able to locate a mobile phone in less than 5 seconds. 310 ITU‐T's Technical Reports and Specifications     315     316     317     318     319     320     321     322     323     324     325          
Language:English
Score: 1271183.6 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica.../files/basic-html/page320.html
Data Source: un
Cell Broadcast Broker Cell Broadcast Broker (CBBS) Overview, V3.2, 10 Feb 2003 Mark Wood, CEASA. (...) Cell broadcast messages can be employed in several ways when a number of cell phone users in a certain geographical area need the same urgent information. Such information may include text messages relating to emergency situations, and, for 3G cells and phones, pictures of wanted or missing persons or maps of areas to avoid and best escape routes.
Language:English
Score: 1269742.4 - https://www.itu.int/itudoc/itu.../workshop/ets/whtp-001_ww9.doc
Data Source: un
EXCEPTION FROM MARKING REQUIREMENT FOR LITHIUM BUTTON CELL BATTERIES / TRANSMITTED BY THE PORTABLE RECHARGEABLE BATTERY ASSOCIATION (PRBA) AND THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE PROMOTION AND MANAGEMENT OF PORTABLE RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES THROUGH THEIR LIFE CYCLE (RECHARGE)
Such equipment includes cellular phones, computers, MP3 players, printers, cordless phones, watches, calculators, etc. (...) Types of button cell batteries 3. Below are examples of lithium button cell batteries on the market today. (...) A single button cell in equipment presents virtually no risk in transportation.
Language:English
Score: 1268970.3 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...ST/SG/AC.10/C.3/2008/94&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
The sirens should be serviced and maintained once every six months by contracted technicians, with oversight from the Department of Seismology Head Engineer. 2.2 Cell Broadcast Following a formal disaster warning, the cell broadcast messaging system may be used for disseminating updates to the public. (...) Messages can be sent to cell subscribers within a defined geo-fenced area. All messages must be approved by the Incident Controller, or in their absence, the NEOC Operations Manager. The cell broadcast message should be shared with Mobile Network Operators (MNOs) for dissemination to mobile phones active in the defined geo-fenced area. 2.3 Broadcast Radio (AM/FM) The GDMO has a Memorandum of Understanding with radio broadcasters in Getonia to break into usual programming to broadcast pre-recorded emergency warnings to notify radio listeners that an emergency is occurring in their area, (including tsunami).
Language:English
Score: 1267877.3 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/E...gency%20Telecommunications.pdf
Data Source: un
Claude Hakizimana Head of Protected Areas Management Service Burundi Office For Environment Protection (OBPE) Bujumbura, Burundi Email :haclaude2007@yahoo.fr Cell Phone:(00257) 79 341084 7. Cameroon Mr. Eric Kaffo Nzouwo Sub Director of Inventories and Forest Management Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife Yaounde, Cameroon Phone: (237) 677 97 55 89/ (237) 699 58 96 39 Email: kaffoeric@yahoo.fr 8. (...) Sindhu Prasad Dhungana, PhD Joint-Secretary and Chief Planning, Monitoring and Coordination Division Ministry of Forests and Environment, Kathmandu Nepal Phone: +977 1 4211936 Fax: +977 1 4211868 Cell Phone: +977 9860330217 Email: sindhungana@gmail.com; sindhupd.dhungana@nepal.gov.np 29. (...) Box 40832, 15472 Dar Es Salaam. Phone: +255 713 356 678 Email: amina.akida@gmail.com; amina.akida@tfs.go.tz 38.
Language:English
Score: 1264871.6 - https://www.un.org/esa/forests...pants_list_MAR_egm_Nov2018.pdf
Data Source: un
P: The DGP 8-1, item 19) s the provisio exemption f able 8-1 is “P s, laptop com since there ar hich can be ea ered toy vehi red by lithium ular phones bu Civil Aviatio PAPER GOODS PA P MEETIN 7 April to 1 M dations for a angerous Goo rning Passeng ADD SOME RONIC DEV d by H. (...) GP-WG/15-W /4/15 ctions ion in crew. article ulating at the ries or nds. es are re not WP/35 DGP-WG/15-WP/35 - 2 - 1.3 We propose to add some bigger items such as toy vehicles for children and electronic scooters and unicycles to the list with watches, calculating machines, cameras, cellular phones, laptop computers and camcorders so as to avoid unnecessary confusion among operators as well as passengers. 2. (...) Consumer articles . . . 19) Portable electronic devices (such as watches, calculating machines, cameras, cellular phones, laptop computers, camcorders, toy vehicles, electronic scooters and unicycles) ≠ Portable electronic devices (including medical devices) containing lithium metal or lithium ion cells or batteries (articles containing lithium metal or lithium ion cells or batteries the primary purpose of which is to provide power to another device must be carried as spare batteries in accordance with the item below) Yes Yes Yes No No a) carried by passengers or crew for personal use; b) should be carried as carry-on baggage; c) each battery must not exceed the following: — for lithium metal batteries, a lithium content of not more than 2 grams; or — for lithium ion batteries, a Watt-hour rating of not more than 100 Wh; d) if devices are carried in checked baggage, measures must be taken to prevent unintentional activation; and e) batteries and cells must be of a type which meets the requirements of each test in the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria, Part III, subsection 38.3. . . . — END —
Language:English
Score: 1263702.05 - https://www.icao.int/safety/Da...PWG15/DGPWG.15.WP.035.2.en.pdf
Data Source: un
Magpi) Social media Maps and simple GIS Smartphones and Cellular Networks Capabilities 2/2 Users can supply their own communications tools (cell phones) for disaster response. Users do not require special training except in the use of unfamiliar apps Cell phones can operate independent of cellular infrastructure, using Wi Fi and Bluetooth, if alternative hardware and software (e.g. Serval Mesh and Mesh Extender) are available Smartphones and Cellular Networks Limitations Cell phones cannot function if they do not have a communication medium: Infrastructure (cell towers) can physically fail because of the disaster The system can be overloaded because too many subscribers urgently wish to contact family members or share pictures The power supply to maintain the system fails. (...) SIMPLE SATELLITE THEORY Satellites in Earth Orbit Geostationary Orbit (GEO) Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Satellite 1 Capabilities of Geostationary satellites Three satellites can cover the surface of the globe (except the north and south poles) Aerials on fixed installations (e.g. satellite TV) only need to be aligned once Tend to be high bandwidth and good for computer data Satellite Limitations of Geostationary satellites Require a dish or directional antenna to focus a weak signal The dish/antenna will need to be realigned every time it changes location Fixed installations will be damaged by the disaster or run out of battery power Satellite Capabilities of LEO satellites: Are closer to the earth: Need less power so the handsets and batteries are smaller Have smaller, nondirectional, antennae Move across the sky so, if one is obscured it will shortly be replaced by another one Have truly global coverage, although satellites are farthest apart at the equator Easy to carry around and use like a telephone Satellite Limitations of LEO satellites: Can lose connection as a satellite is obscured or moves out of range Tend to be low bandwidth, designed for voice with only a limited data capability Social Media Description: Social media are a relatively new communication system that emerged when the World Wide Web (WWW) and cell phones became available to the general public.
Language:English
Score: 1263622.3 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/R.../May-NETP/S2_Matthew_Lloyd.pdf
Data Source: un
And by 1994 the international text telephone standard recommendation V18 was published adds a major land washing in tying together text toll phone protocols with allowing previously incompatible telephones in different countries to communicate. (...) Here is what it looks like in a 3D video phone with signing which is not full speed. It is a bit cumbersome to read for sign language. (...) Even design mainstream ICT lacks user interfaces for people with disabilities. For example cell phones with menus for navigation and require sight and have no audio functionality for reading the menus out loud for inputting commands much we find that mainstream ICT does not interface seamlessly with assistive technology, for example text telephones used by consumers who are deaf and hard of hearing for making telephone calls in one country cannot be used to call consumers in a different country.
Language:English
Score: 1262953.1 - https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/it.../06/0E/T060E0070030002MSWE.doc
Data Source: un
Pictured, a child on a cell phone in Niger. World Bank/ Arne Hoel People with limited access to educational opportunities are discovering the usefulness of small-screen devices as a low-cost portal to reading materials. Here, a woman helps a young girl read on a cell phone as other children look on. Worldreader Females read far more on mobile devices than males, says the study, while both men and women read more when they read on a mobile device. Here, a young woman reads from her cell phone at a community meeting in India. World Bank/Simone McCourtie On the occasion of the annual World Book and Copyright Day (23 April), UNESCO issued a call to rally around books and all those who write and produce books.
Language:English
Score: 1262829.2 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2...tial-mobile-technology-advance
Data Source: un
Please send  us the hotel registration confirmation and the details of your arrival and departure flights to:  Pablo Palacios  Programme Officer Area Office  Chile   Phone: (+56) 2 2632 6134  Cell: 56‐9‐8739‐2576  pablo.palacios@itu.int  Carolina Baquerizo  Communications Department‐ ARCOTEL  Phone:(593) 2 – 2‐ 227‐2180 ext. 3133  Cell: (+593) 99 388 7919  carolina.baquerizo@arcotel.gob.ec   Erick Santillán  International Affairs Department MINTEL  Phone: (+593) 2 200 200 Ext. 6601  Cell: (593) 9 8 4452 773  erick.santillan@mintel.gob.ec   4. (...) For any support and question related to the Visa application process, please contact:  Catherine Perugachi  International Affairs Department‐ MINTEL          3    Phone: (+593) 2 200 200 Ext. 240  Cell: (593) 9 8 1129310  catherine.perugachi@mintel.gob.ec  5. (...) CONTACTS  Pablo Palacios  Programme Officer Area Office Chile   Phone: (+56) 2 2632 6134  Cell: 56‐9‐8739‐2576  pablo.palacios@itu.int  Carolina Baquerizo  Communications Department‐ ARCOTEL Phone:(593) 2 – 2‐ 227‐2180 ext. 3133  Cell: (+593) 99 388 7919  carolina.baquerizo@arcotel.gob.ec   Erick Santillán  International Affairs Department MINTEL Phone: (+593) 2 200 200 Ext. 6601  Cell: (593) 9 8 4452 773  erick.santillan@mintel.gob.ec   10.
Language:English
Score: 1260568.2 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/R...C/Practical-Information-EN.pdf
Data Source: un