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Ramallah hospital confirmed that the Ni’lin resident, regained consciousness on 25 August and is receiving treatment for a fractured skull. Also on 22 August, during the weekly anti-Barrier demonstration at Bil’in village (Ramallah), tens of cases of tear gas related asphyxia were reported, as well as cases of vomiting and nausea among Palestinian, Israeli, and international activists when the Border Police sprayed the crowd with chemically treated foul-smelling liquid. (...) On 24 August, the Coastal Municipalities Water Utility (CMWU) in the Gaza Strip launched an appeal to international humanitarian agencies to provide 30 thousand litres of fuel for water pumping and waste water treatment. According to the CMWU, the utility has not received regular fuel supply since 1 August 2008 due to lack of payment by the Palestinian Water Authority in Ramallah. (...) A fence around the cemetery has been erected, with a notice that any organisation attempting maintenance of the cemetery will face legal consequences.
Language:English
Score: 1610946.9 - https://www.un.org/unispal/document/auto-insert-205728/
Data Source: un
Research conducted to locate the burial locations of these children required consulting school records, state death certificates and cemetery records. However, the sources reported that these records were inconsistent or difficult to obtain. (...) The sources reported that the Indigenous students were often buried in unmarked or unidentified graves, especially if they died on “outings” from the schools. Some schools’ cemeteries became parks and graves were erased. 2 17. (...) These damages experienced among the targeted Indigenous peoples continue to reverberate in those communities as a result of the impact of historical and inter-generational trauma with no apparent plan by the United States for treatment to stem the continuing traumatic response.
Language:English
Score: 1601612.9 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...rances/Allegations/118_USA.pdf
Data Source: un
Moreover, because trends project a balance of 60:40 by the year 2020, the plan proposed a number of measures aimed at maintaining a ‘Jewish majority in the city while attending to the needs of the Arab minority.’ 10   These policies take on two dimensions: the privileged treatment of Jewish nationals and citizens and/or the discriminatory treatment of Jerusalem’s Palestinian residents. (...) Notwithstanding Human Rights Council Resolution A/HRC/13/L.29 (24 March 2010) condemning, and ordering the cessation of, the desecration at the Mamilla Muslim cemetery as well as other actions against holy sites in and around Jerusalem, Israel continues its systematic desecration of the Muslim cemetery without abatement. (...) Notes 1 The Absentees’ Property Law, 5710-1950. 2 Badil, “Eviction, Restitution, and Protection of Palestinian Rights in Jerusalem,” (April 1999) 3 http://www.btselem.org/english/Jerusalem/Revocation_of_Residency.asp 4 Human Rights Watch, “Separate and Unequal: Israel’s Discriminatory Treatment of Palestinians in the Occupied Palestinian Territories,” (December 2010).   5 Id. 6 http://www.jcser.org/index.php?
Language:English
Score: 1574579.5 - https://www.un.org/unispal/document/auto-insert-183864/
Data Source: un
Contact us Get Involved Get Involved Latest Stories “My name is not XX”: searching for the truth by naming the disappeared 23 March 2012 Share Thousands of unidentified bodies, labelled XX, have been buried in common graves at La Verbena cemetery, in Guatemala City, for many decades. Many of them are believed to be the victims of enforced disappearances during the country's 36-year-long civil war (1960-1996). (...) The work of the Foundation “demonstrates that the relentless efforts of victims’ families to finally know the truth about the fate of their loved ones have not been in vain,” said UN Human Rights Chief Navi Pillay during a recent visit to La Verbena cemetery. She said that the perpetrators of these gross human rights violations “may have tried to silence the victims who are buried here, but they were unable to silence their families.” (...) Its importance in that context has not abated, but the right has evolved and its application has been extended to other gross violations of human rights such as extrajudicial executions, torture and ill treatment, including sexual violence. It provides for victims and their families the right to know the truth about the circumstances in which violations of human rights occurred, including who participated in them.
Language:English
Score: 1518557 - https://www.ohchr.org/en/stori...ching-truth-naming-disappeared
Data Source: un
Appendix (9) Tatmadaw Investigations in Inn Din Case The skeletons of the Bengalis found at the cemetery of Inn Din Village The skeletons of the Bengalis found at the cemetery of Inn Din Village ICC-RoC46(3)-01/18-34-AnxV 06-08-2018 1/3 NM PT The responsible persons conducted the interrogation processes relating to the skeletons found at the cemetery of Inn Din Village ICC-RoC46(3)-01/18-34-AnxV 06-08-2018 2/3 NM PT The responsible persons conducted the interrogation processes relating to the skeletons found at the cemetery of Inn Din Village The responsible persons conducted the interrogation processes relating to the skeletons found at the cemetery of Inn Din Village ICC-RoC46(3)-01/18-34-AnxV 06-08-2018 3/3 NM PT
Language:English
Score: 1463752 - https://www.icc-cpi.int/sites/...elatedRecords/CR2018_03983.PDF
Data Source: un
Desecration of Muslim Cemetery in Jerusalem - Letter from Palestine, Petition - Question of Palestine Skip to content Welcome to the United Nations عربي 中文 English Français Русский Español Search for: Home About The Committee on Palestinian Rights Division for Palestinian Rights Key Topics Key issues at stake The Quartet History Fast facts The Committee Background Bureau Membership Mandate and Objectives Areas of Activities Working Group Reports Statements Newsletters Events Upcoming Events Committee Meetings International Conferences and Side Events Delegation visits Solidarity Day Capacity Building Programme UNISPAL About UNISPAL Search Document Collection Map Collection Civil Society Overview Responsibilities of Civil Society Partners NGO Action News Get accredited Benefits of accreditation Civil Society Partners UN System FAQ Search for: Home / Desecration of Muslim Cemetery in Jerusalem – Letter from Palestine, Petition Desecration of Muslim Cemetery in Jerusalem – Letter from Palestine, Petition     Identical letters dated 9 April 2010 from the Permanent Observer of Palestine to the United Nations addressed to the Secretary-General and the President of the Security Council       I have the honour to enclose herewith a petition for “Urgent action on human rights violations by Israel: Desecration of the Ma’man Allah (Mamilla) Muslim Cemetery in the Holy City of Jerusalem”, filed by Palestinian individuals whose ancestors are buried at Ma’man Allah cemetery in addition to several other non-governmental organizations from Palestine, Israel and the United States, who oppose the establishment of so called “Centre for Human Dignity and Museum of Tolerance” on the human remains of the dead Muslims buried in the Cemetery (see annex).    (...) Protection of cultural heritage and cultural property, including religious sites such as cemeteries, are guaranteed by international human rights instruments such as the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Heritage Convention, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Convention on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. Furthermore building on the cemetery constitutes a violation of basic human rights including the right to manifest religious beliefs, the right to family and culture and the right to freedom from discrimination, as set forth in the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination.   
Language:English
Score: 1451930.3 - https://www.un.org/unispal/document/auto-insert-182179/
Data Source: un
  © UNHCR/Nicolò Filippo Rosso Over the nearly half-century that she worked in forensics, there was one thing Sonia Bermúdez simply could not abide: the sad fact that those whose families could afford funerals were given very different treatment from those who could not. And so, she set about eliminating that disparity, founding a non-profit organization dedicated to making sure the poorest and most vulnerable people receive a dignified burial – regardless of their nationality or their loved ones’ ability to pay. (...) Burying their loved one in the charity’s cemetery “brought them peace and tranquillity,” Sonia said. (...) They are both buried in Sonia’s cemetery. “I will never forget them,” said Sonia, adding, “their story really left a mark on me.”
Language:English
Score: 1421599.1 - https://www.unhcr.org/afr/news...zuelans-dignified-burials.html
Data Source: un
  © UNHCR/Nicolò Filippo Rosso Over the nearly half-century that she worked in forensics, there was one thing Sonia Bermúdez simply could not abide: the sad fact that those whose families could afford funerals were given very different treatment from those who could not. And so, she set about eliminating that disparity, founding a non-profit organization dedicated to making sure the poorest and most vulnerable people receive a dignified burial – regardless of their nationality or their loved ones’ ability to pay. (...) Burying their loved one in the charity’s cemetery “brought them peace and tranquillity,” Sonia said. (...) They are both buried in Sonia’s cemetery. “I will never forget them,” said Sonia, adding, “their story really left a mark on me.”
Language:English
Score: 1421599.1 - https://www.unhcr.org/en-au/ne...zuelans-dignified-burials.html
Data Source: un
  © UNHCR/Nicolò Filippo Rosso Over the nearly half-century that she worked in forensics, there was one thing Sonia Bermúdez simply could not abide: the sad fact that those whose families could afford funerals were given very different treatment from those who could not. And so, she set about eliminating that disparity, founding a non-profit organization dedicated to making sure the poorest and most vulnerable people receive a dignified burial – regardless of their nationality or their loved ones’ ability to pay. (...) Burying their loved one in the charity’s cemetery “brought them peace and tranquillity,” Sonia said. (...) They are both buried in Sonia’s cemetery. “I will never forget them,” said Sonia, adding, “their story really left a mark on me.”
Language:English
Score: 1421599.1 - https://www.unhcr.org/en-ie/ne...zuelans-dignified-burials.html
Data Source: un
  © UNHCR/Nicolò Filippo Rosso Over the nearly half-century that she worked in forensics, there was one thing Sonia Bermúdez simply could not abide: the sad fact that those whose families could afford funerals were given very different treatment from those who could not. And so, she set about eliminating that disparity, founding a non-profit organization dedicated to making sure the poorest and most vulnerable people receive a dignified burial – regardless of their nationality or their loved ones’ ability to pay. (...) Burying their loved one in the charity’s cemetery “brought them peace and tranquillity,” Sonia said. (...) They are both buried in Sonia’s cemetery. “I will never forget them,” said Sonia, adding, “their story really left a mark on me.”
Language:English
Score: 1421599.1 - https://www.unhcr.org/en-us/ne...zuelans-dignified-burials.html
Data Source: un