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Step 1 Set up an implementation Task Force Step 2 Understand the change and conduct gap analysis Assigned to Deadline Completed Analyze and understand the changes in regulatory requirements. (...) The individual with overall responsibility and authority for implementation of the change and, where applicable, the risk owner should approve the action plan for implementation of the change. (...) In the case of changes to electronic systems, mechanisms to test and validate changes to the systems should be developed.
Language:English
Score: 273027.44 - https://www.icao.int/safety/Si...ages/GRF/ACI_GRF_Checklist.pdf
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Within the context of these changes, the impacts of climate change were considered to be manageable. 8. (...) Examples for climate change impact assessment 34. A few studies have begun to apply vulnerability indices to climate change. (...) In the following section, issues specific to climate change are reviewed. B. Issues in climate change applications 45.
Language:English
Score: 273022.7 - https://www.un.org/esa/sustdev/csd/csd9_bp6.pdf
Data Source: un
Climate Change Education Inside and Outside the Classroom Climate Change Education Inside and Outside the Classroom UNESCO Course ESD as a response to climate change in Africa and SIDS Module 1  1. (...)  MITIGATION: identifying the causes of climate change and developing the knowledge, skills and values needed to rectify those causes.  ADAPTATION: building resilience and reducing vulnerability to climate change impacts.  UNDERSTANDING & ATTENTIVENESS: not only understanding the causes and impacts of climate change, but creating a mind-set of alertness, care and responsibility at individual and communal levels. THE DYNAMICS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ESD  Secondary school teachers have a vital role to play in equipping young people and communities to reduce their vulnerability to multiple stresses caused by climate change.  Through locally relevant, up-to-date and critically -informed curriculum activities, secondary school teachers can:  Develop knowledge, skills and values needed in communities to adapt to climate change stresses;  Provide essential information related to disaster risk management;  Initiate projects and networks to take appropriate action, locally and globally;  Develop critical thinking skills and ethical responses in young people to foster the social change needed for climate change mitigation.
Language:English
Score: 273016.63 - https://en.unesco.org/sites/de.../1.5_esd_as_response_to_cc.pdf
Data Source: un
Climate Adaptation Synthesis Changes in biodiversity Factsheet ENVIRONMENT 2018 Aviation and Changes to Biodiversity The main risks to aviation from changes to biodiversity are wildlife migration and propagation of invasive species. Composition of ecosystems may change, leading to changes in both local biodiversity and wildlife migration patterns. (...) Changing interactions between flora and fauna may also be possible as both are expected to migrate due to climate change.
Language:English
Score: 273016.63 - https://www.icao.int/environme...hanges%20to%20Biodiversity.pdf
Data Source: un
PowerPoint Presentation Climate change, regulatory change and regionalism in the Pacific Espen Ronneberg Climate Change Adviser SPREP Regional policy context • Long history of regional cooperation and coordination, due to capacity constraints, lack of resources and a commonality of challenges faced. • Regional agencies established for assisting countries. • Cooperate through the Council of Regional Organisations of the Pacific (CROP), and prominent in supporting requests of their Members. (...) Foremost agency on climate change and lead coordinator Climate change • Leaders recognise climate change to be the biggest threat facing the region. • Climate change is a dynamic, fast-moving, and SPREP is well placed as a leader, coordinator, and implementer in its areas of competence and expertise. • Historically only agency on climate change but greater involvement of others now PCCC • Pacific Climate Change Centre (PCCC), regional hub for inclusive collaboration and coordination on climate change priorities of Pacific. • Organisations working on climate change will have a conduit for collaboration for focussing and coordinating effort • PCCC direct benefit of Pacific, delivery of climate change and disaster risk management knowledge and services Coordination • SPREP coordinated regional projects on policy development. PIGGAREP looked at institutional, technical and regulatory barriers to renewable energy. • Countries enabling environments changed to be more conducive to introduction of renewable energy. • PIFACC established advisory aspects of climate change, discussions under the Pacific Climate Change Roundtable, and for the establishment of the Pacific Climate Change Portal.
Language:English
Score: 272991.75 - https://www.icao.int/environme...alism%20in%20the%20Pacific.pdf
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See, e.g., Human Rights and Climate Change (Stephen Humphreys ed., 2010); International Council on Human Rights Policy, Climate Change and Human Rights: A Rough Guide (2008). (...) L. 204 (2012); John H. Knox, Climate Change and Human Rights Law, 50 Va. 3 human rights obligations and climate change warrants further investigation and clarification. (...)  One commonly noted obstacle to applying obligations on States to address climate change has to do with the difficulty of tracing clear causal links between anthropogenic contributions to climate change and the effects of climate change on the enjoyment of human rights.
Language:English
Score: 272962.8 - https://www.ohchr.org/sites/de...monix_France_15-16July2014.pdf
Data Source: un
Microsoft Word - New_Zealand_CCIS.DOC REPORT ON NEW ZEALAND’S VIEWS ON THE POSSIBLE SECURITY IMPLICATIONS OF CLIMATE CHANGE Key Points • The possible implications of climate change for security is a relatively new angle to international discussions on climate change. (...) The type of conflict that may occur, when, and to what extent, as a result of the adverse impacts of climate change is still relatively unclear and undefined. • Without effective mitigation and adaptation action, climate change is likely to become a major driver of change to the security environment after 2030. (...) It will be important to continue to provide assistance to Pacific and other vulnerable states in evaluating the impacts of and adapting to climate change. • The Niue Declaration on climate change (attached as Annex A) references the adverse impacts of climate change in the Pacific.
Language:English
Score: 272915.48 - https://www.un.org/esa/dsd/res...cc-inputs/New_Zealand_CCIS.pdf
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Forestry and climate change English Français Español FAO Home Forestry Forestry & climate change home Roles of forests in climate change FAO forest & climate change programme Other FAO work on climate change Publications and multimedia Forestry & climate change news Newsletter Clim-Fo-L Forests and climate change events Summary of past UNFCCC negotiations and meetings Links Team members Forestry and climate change send by email Roles of forests in climate change Forests have four major roles in climate change: they currently contribute about one-sixth of global carbon emissions when cleared, overused or degraded; they react sensitively to a changing climate; when managed sustainably, they produce woodfuels as a benign alternative to fossil fuels; and finally, they have the potential to absorb about one-tenth of global carbon emissions projected for the first half of this century into their biomass, soils and products and store them - in principle in perpetuity.   More New publications Newsletter   CLIM-FO-L is a forum for sharing information and experiences about climate change and forestry .  For more information on Clim-Fo-L please follow the link [ more... ]   Climate change links UNFCCC IPCC UN on climate change UN-REDD FAO and Climate Change Upcoming meetings and events last updated:  Friday, June 24, 2016 Contact us  |  Privacy policy  |  Scam alert © FAO, 2022
Language:English
Score: 272900.59 - https://www.fao.org/forestry/climatechange/en/
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ITU AND CLIMATE CHANGE        Contents   Foreword   ICTs and climate change  ITU and climate change   ITU and the UN   ICTs as a clean technology   Monitoring climate change   Adaptation   Mitigation   Remote collaboration   Events and glossary   ITU elected officials ITU and Climate Change Objectives and orientations Developing an effective response to climate change calls for action in virtually all of ITU’s fields of competence. (...) In 2008, climate change was one of the main topics of the G8 meeting in Japan. (...) Follow ongoing global negotiations on climate change and participate actively in meetings planned under the Bali Roadmap; organize side events on ICTs and climate change.
Language:English
Score: 272841.85 - https://www.itu.int/themes/cli...rt/03_ITUandClimateChange.html
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Vision_2030 Vision 2030: the resilience of water supply and sanitation in the face of climate change | 28 October 2009 1 | Vision 2030: The resilience of water supply and sanitation in the face of climate change Vision 2030: The resilience of water supply and sanitation in the face of climate change Chee-Keong CHEW 28 October 2009 Vision 2030: the resilience of water supply and sanitation in the face of climate change | 28 October 2009 2 | ScopeScope Why climate resilience is important? (...) Safe drinking water and Sanitation => foundations of Public Health and Development Climate change is a fact and its impacts threaten water supply and sanitation – Most impacts through extreme weather events such as floods, droughts, storms – Increase vulnerability to human health, water security, resource scarcity Sanitation Safe Drinking Water Public Health and Development Climate Change Impacts threat multiplier Vision 2030: the resilience of water supply and sanitation in the face of climate change | 28 October 2009 4 | Overview of Vision 2030 StudyOverview of Vision 2030 Study Jointly undertaken by WHO and Department for International Development, UK Objectives – brings together evidence (projections on climate change and trending on technology application) – develop knowledge on adaptability and resilience of drinking water and sanitation – identify key policy, planning and operational changes and knowledge gaps Time horizon: 2020 and 2030 Vision 2030: the resilience of water supply and sanitation in the face of climate change | 28 October 2009 5 | Overview of Vision 2030 StudyOverview of Vision 2030 Study Predicates on 3 detailed technical studies Study 2: Vulnerability, adaptation & resilience of WASH facilities to climate change, RCPEH) Study 3: Projections on Precipitation (Status & trends in technology application, WHO, RCPEH) Study 1: Projections on Precipitation (Met Office, Hadley Centre, UK) Vision 2030: the resilience of water supply and sanitation in the face of climate change | 28 October 2009 6 | Summary of FindingsSummary of Findings Projections on precipitation – Decadal forecasts applied to predict changes in frequency of heavy 5-day rainfall events – Forecasts for 2020 demonstrated impacts that carry on to 2030 Status and trends in technology application – WHO/ UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water and Sanitation – Access to drinking water in urban and rural areas – Access to sanitation in urban and rural areas Vision 2030: the resilience of water supply and sanitation in the face of climate change | 28 October 2009 7 | Summary of FindingsSummary of Findings Resilience of water technologies Category 1: Potentially resilient to all expected climate change impacts - Utility piped water supply - Tubewells Category 2: Potentially resilient to most expected climate change impacts - Protected springs - Small piped systems Category 3: Potentially resilient to only restricted number of climate change impacts - Dug wells - Rainwater harvesting Technologies categorized by JMP as “not improved drinking water sources” - Unprotected springs, unprotected dug wells, Carts with small tank and drum, Surface water (rivers, dams, lakes, ponds, Bottled water Though water technologies are vulnerable to climate change, all have some adaptive potential Vision 2030: the resilience of water supply and sanitation in the face of climate change | 28 October 2009 8 | Summary of FindingsSummary of Findings Drinking Water Management – Urban utility managed supply has very high potential resilience and adaptive capacity • Good O&M, prudent investment in human capital, asset renewal/ upgrading – Small community water supply is highly vulnerable • Inadequate O&M => high failure rate and possibility of contamination Lack of tools to assess climate change resilience of technology in a given location Vision 2030: the resilience of water supply and sanitation in the face of climate change | 28 October 2009 9 | Summary of FindingsSummary of Findings Resilience of sanitation technology Category 1: Potentially resilient to all expected climate change impacts - Low-flush septic systems - Pit latrines Category 2: Potentially resilient to most expected climate change impacts - Conventional and modifies sewerage - High flush septic systems Technologies categorized by JMP as “not improved drinking water sources” -Latrines without a slab or platform - Hanging latrines Sewerage – the “gold” standard sanitation technology – is only resilient to climate change in some scenarios Vision 2030: the resilience of water supply and sanitation in the face of climate change | 28 October 2009 10 | Summary of FindingsSummary of Findings Sanitation Management – Utility managed sanitation (mainly sewerage) • High underlying resilience of centralized sewerage systems being compromised by lower resilience of sewerage technology – Household-managed sanitation • Potential to be highly resilient to climate change but contingent on many factors => good management, adequate guidance etc. • Source of pollution to groundwater with increased rainfall or during floods Lack of information on the resilience of technologies and management in specific circumstances – crucial to review programmes and operations Vision 2030: the resilience of water supply and sanitation in the face of climate change | 28 October 2009 11 | Key Policy ImplicationsKey Policy Implications Low resilience of water supply against climate impacts have serious public health consequences – Deteriorating water quality, water scarcity Comprehensive water policies and management are key – Intersectoral management of water resources e.g. (...) There may be significant overall benefits to health and development in adapting to climate change. Major changes in policy and planning are needed if ongoing and future investments are not to be wasted.
Language:English
Score: 272822.27 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DA...g/power_points/Vision_2030.pdf
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