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The Responsibility to Protect In the 2005 World Summit Outcome Document ( A/RES/60/1 ) Member States noted the "Responsibility to protect populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity". The Outcome Document stated, in paragraph 138, that "Each individual State has the responsibility to protect its populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. (...) We stress the need for the General Assembly to continue consideration of the responsibility to protect populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity and its implications, bearing in mind the principles of the Charter and international law. We also intend to commit ourselves, as necessary and appropriate, to helping States build capacity to protect their populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity and to assisting those which are under stress before crises and conflicts break out."     
Language:English
Score: 1200027.1 - https://www.un.org/en/conferences/environment/newyork2005
Data Source: un
UN Photo/John Isaac Ethnic cleansing has not been recognized as an independent crime under international law. (...) The expression “ethnic cleansing” has been used in resolutions of the Security Council and the General Assembly, and has been acknowledged in judgments and indictments of the ICTY, although it did not constitute one of the counts for prosecution. (...) Definition As ethnic cleansing has not been recognized as an independent crime under international law, there is no precise definition of this concept or the exact acts to be qualified as ethnic cleansing.
Language:English
Score: 1112303.4 - https://www.un.org/en/genocide...vention/ethnic-cleansing.shtml
Data Source: un
Mandate: On 24 July 2020, the Human Rights Council adopted resolution 44/14 on the “fifteenth anniversary of the responsibility to protect populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity, as enshrined in the 2005 World Summit Outcome.” (...) Background: The concept of “responsibility to protect populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity” emerged during the 1990s and was adopted in 2005 at the United Nations World Summit. (...) It highlights the “important contribution of the United Nations human rights system to efforts towards addressing situations in which genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity could be committed.”
Language:English
Score: 1072659.5 - https://www.un.org/en/genocide...ional-Panel-Discussion-R2P.pdf
Data Source: un
The Responsibility to Protect In the 2005 World Summit Outcome Document ( A/RES/60/1 ) Member States noted the "Responsibility to protect populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity". The Outcome Document stated, in paragraph 138, that "Each individual State has the responsibility to protect its populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. (...) We stress the need for the General Assembly to continue consideration of the responsibility to protect populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity and its implications, bearing in mind the principles of the Charter and international law. We also intend to commit ourselves, as necessary and appropriate, to helping States build capacity to protect their populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity and to assisting those which are under stress before crises and conflicts break out."     
Language:English
Score: 1064417.8 - https://www.un.org/en/node/89113
Data Source: un
Microsoft PowerPoint - SVG Equipment and Additional Demand 0 DEMAND PLANNING UCS Training Team Equipment and Additional Demand Umoja Demand Planning and Supply Network Planning Solution 1 GROSS DEMAND Historical Data (Consumption and Sales Data) Classification Data Cleansing Segmentation Statistical Forecast Process of planning the Gross Demand 1 2 3 4 5 Entity Priority Project Additional Demand 2 Consumption History from Umoja Production 1. (...) Analyze and Adjust (Consumption and Sales) 3. Data Cleansing Final History Input Cleansed History Output Planning the Gross Demand 1of 2 Output Input 2.Classification *Done by the system 3 4.Segmentation *Done by the system 5.Statistical Forecast … Gross Demand Additional Demand Final Statistical Forecast Equipment Demand Entity Priority Project Demand Planning the Gross Demand 2 of 2 Input Cleansed History Output 4 Additional Demand Additional Demand Equipment Demand  Events  Products without historical Data It allows to capture new requirements for which there is no historical consumption to use as baseline for forecasting. (...) Write-off and Repair information In-Repair Projected It shows the average of 12 months of History of Equipment in Repair. 11 GROSS DEMAND Final Statistical Forecast Entity Priority Project Demand Additional Demand  Equipment  Other products/services Process of planning the Gross Demand 12 GROSS DEMAND Historical Data (Consumption and Sales Data) Classification Data Cleansing Segmentation Statistical Forecast Process of planning the Gross Demand 1 2 3 4 5 Entity Priority Project Additional Demand 13
Language:English
Score: 1062899.4 - https://umoja.un.org/sites/umo...ment_and_additional_demand.pdf
Data Source: un
Each individual State has the responsibility to protect its populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. This responsibility entails the prevention of such crimes, including their incitement, through appropriate and necessary means. (...) We stress the need for the General Assembly to continue consideration of the responsibility to protect populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity and its implications, bearing in mind the principles of the Charter and international law. We also intend to commit ourselves, as necessary and appropriate, to helping States build capacity to protect their populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity and to assisting those which are under stress before crises and conflicts break out. 140.
Language:English
Score: 1061189.9 - https://www.un.org/en/genocide...esponsibility-to-protect.shtml
Data Source: un
In particular, paragraph 139 of the 2005 World Summit Outcome Document stresses “the need for the General Assembly to continue consideration of the responsibility to protect populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity and its implications, bearing in mind the principles of the Charter and international law.” (...) Secretary-General’s report: Responsibility to protect: from early warning to early action ( A/72/884–S/2018/525 ) Official plenary meeting records for 25 June and 2 July 27-28 June 2019 Debate on the responsibility to protect and the prevention of genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. Secretary-General’s report: Responsibility to protect: lessons learned for prevention ( A/73/898–S/2019/463 ) Acting on the recommendation of its General Committee, in 2018 and 2019 the General Assembly discussed within its formal agenda the Secretary-General’s reports on the Responsibility to Protect. 2020 Debate did not take place due to COVID-19. Secretary-General’s report: Prioritizing prevention and strengthening response: women and the responsibility to protect ( A/74/964 - S/2020/501 ) 17-18 May 2021 Debate on the responsibility to responsibility to protect and the prevention of genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. Secretary-General’s report: Advancing atrocity prevention: work of the Office on Genocide Prevention and the Responsibility to Protect ( A/75/863–S/2021/424 ) Official plenary meeting records for General Assembly President Volkan Bozkir’s opening remarks , 17 May morning , 17 May afternoon and 18 May morning [00:00 – 56:55].
Language:English
Score: 1039062.6 - https://www.un.org/en/genocide...vention/general-assembly.shtml
Data Source: un
The Appeals Chamber confirmed that this criminal plan was implemented through the ethnic cleansing of Bosnian Muslims from their homes and communities across several municipalities, including Gornji Vakuf, Jablanica, Prozor, Mostar, Ljubuški, Stolac and Čapljina between mid-January 1993 and April 1994. (...) The civilian population, which had more than doubled to some 55,000 as a result of the ethnic cleansing of Muslims from West Mostar and other locations, was subjected to constant sniping and shelling and forced to live under extremely harsh conditions. (...) While these six accused have been held accountable for this campaign of ethnic cleansing, more senior- and mid-level officials and commanders must still be brought to justice for these crimes.
Language:English
Score: 1032702.5 - https://www.icty.org/en/press/...dgement-in-the-case-prosecutor
Data Source: un
The Tribunal’s indictment charges the accused with leading a plan to ethnically cleanse Bosnian Muslims and other non-Croats from territories that they claimed as part of Herceg-Bosna with a view to joining them to a "Greater Croatian" state. (...) The indictment alleges that the accused resorted to violence and criminal acts to achieve their plan to ethnically cleanse Herceg-Bosna of its Bosnian Muslim and non-Croat population. (...) They were also involved in securing the Republic of Croatia’s assistance in order to further their plans to ethnically cleanse Western Bosnia. The indictment sets out a chronology of the major incidents of ethnic cleansing that began in the spring and early summer of 1992.
Language:English
Score: 1032702.5 - https://www.icty.org/x/file/Ou...rom_hague/balkan_040407_en.pdf
Data Source: un
The Appeals Chamber confirmed that this criminal plan was implemented through the ethnic cleansing of Bosnian Muslims from their homes and communities across several municipalities, including Gornji Vakuf, Jablanica, Prozor, Mostar, Ljubuški, Stolac and Čapljina between mid-January 1993 and April 1994. (...) The civilian population, which had more than doubled to some 55,000 as a result of the ethnic cleansing of Muslims from West Mostar and other locations, was subjected to constant sniping and shelling and forced to live under extremely harsh conditions. (...) While these six accused have been held accountable for this campaign of ethnic cleansing, more senior- and mid-level officials and commanders must still be brought to justice for these crimes.
Language:English
Score: 1032702.5 - https://www.icty.org/en/node/11141
Data Source: un