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These are concerned with: AI and cardiovascular disease risk prediction, child growth monitoring, dermatology, falls among the elderly, histopathology, neuro-cognitive diseases, ophthalmology (retinal imaging diagnostics), psychiatry, radiotherapy, snakebite and snake identification, symptom checkers, tuberculosis, and volumetric chest computed tomography. (...) This document is the TDD for the Topic Group on “AI against neuro-cognitive diseases” (TG-Cogni) The document will be developed cooperatively over several FG-AI4H meetings starting from meeting D in Shanghai. (...) The data will include clinical scores, diagnostic, cognitive measures and biological measures (PET, MRI, fMRI, lab results).
Language:English
Score: 909553.7 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/f...ents/all/FGAI4H-H-016-A01.docx
Data Source: un
PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF ALL HUMAN RIGHTS, CIVIL, POLITICAL, ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RIGHTS, INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO DEVELOPMENT :WRITTEN STATEMENT / SUBMITTED BY THE INTERNATIONAL NETWORK FOR THE PREVENTION OF ELDER ABUSE
The onset of new cognitive impairment was associated with elder abuse and neglect.” (...) According to John Wasik’s article in Forbes Magazine, “4 Risk Factors For Elder Financial Abuse”, they are poor physical health, cognitive impairment, difficulty in activities of daily living, and social isolation. (...) They need the care regardless. Concerning cognitive impairment, when the ability to read a bank statement or balance checkbooks declines, financial literacy declines and are not trying to improve their economic state.
Language:English
Score: 908254 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...pen&DS=A/HRC/39/NGO/141&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Consequently, cognitive abilities have been the primary focus of public policies aiming to rectify inequalities in economic outcomes. (...) Key Open Questions:  What is the optimal timing for cognitive and noncognitive skill development programs? How late is too late to boost cognitive and noncognitive skills?  What are the components of an effective cognitive or noncognitive skill development program targeted to youth?
Language:English
Score: 907449.6 - www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/grou...eetingdocument/wcms_237068.pdf
Data Source: un
Consequently, cognitive abilities have been the primary focus of public policies aiming to rectify inequalities in economic outcomes. (...) Key Open Questions:  What is the optimal timing for cognitive and noncognitive skill development programs? How late is too late to boost cognitive and noncognitive skills?  What are the components of an effective cognitive or noncognitive skill development program targeted to youth?
Language:English
Score: 907449.6 - https://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/gro...eetingdocument/wcms_237068.pdf
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Press release Nearly 19 million newborns at risk of brain damage every year due to iodine deficiency UNICEF and GAIN urge immediate action to increase access to iodized salt amid longstanding evidence on how deficiency reduces cognitive ability 02 March 2018 Available in: English русский türkmençe Nearly 19 million babies born globally every year – 14 per cent – are at risk of permanent yet preventable brain damage and reduced cognitive function due to a lack of iodine in the earliest years of life, according to a new joint report by UNICEF and GAIN released today. (...) This translates into major losses in the cognitive capital of entire nations and thus their socio-economic development. (...) Every dollar spent on salt iodization is estimated to return US $30 through increased future cognitive ability. While South Asia is home to the largest proportion of babies at risk globally, the region has the second highest iodized salt coverage rate at 87 per cent of the population, preceded by East Asia and the Pacific at 91 per cent coverage.
Language:English
Score: 907013.2 - https://www.unicef.org/turkmen...ery-year-due-iodine-deficiency
Data Source: un
ITU Kaleidoscope 2018 – Machine learning for a 5G future Foreword Chaesub Lee Director ITU Telecommunication Standardization Bureau Chairman's Message – Rudy Omar Grether General Chairman Table of Contents Committees Keynote Summary Impact of Machine Learning in 5G Planning and Deployment Session 1 – Machine Learning in Telecommunication Networks - I A MACHINE LEARNING MANAGEMENT MODEL FOR QoE ENHANCEMENT INNEXT-GENERATION WIRELESS ECOSYSTEMS UNSUPERVISED LEARNING FOR DETECTION OF LEAKAGE FROM THE HFCNETWORK DOUBLE SARSA BASED MACHINE LEARNING TO IMPROVE QUALITY OF VIDEOSTREAMING OVER HTTP THROUGH WIRELESS NETWORKS Session 2 – Artificial Intelligence and 5G SELF-HEALING AND RESILIENCE IN FUTURE 5G COGNITIVE AUTONOMOUSNETWORKS AI AS A MICROSERVICE (AIMS) OVER 5G NETWORKS MULTIFRACTAL MODELING OF THE RADIO ELECTRIC SPECTRUM APPLIED INCOGNITIVE RADIO NETWORKS TOWARDS COGNITIVE AUTONOMOUS NETWORKS IN 5G Session 3 – Machine Learning in Telecommunication Networks - II MACHINE LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES IN CLOUD COMPUTING DATA CENTERMANAGEMENT FOR 5G SERVICES CONSIDERATION ON AUTOMATION OF 5G NETWORK SLICING WITHMACHINE LEARNING Session 4 – Optimization of Data Management with Machine Learning A DEEP REINFORCEMENT LEARNING APPROACH FOR DATA MIGRATION INMULTI-ACCESS EDGE COMPUTING Predicting Activities in Business Processes with LSTM Recurrent Neural Networks Session 5 – Network Applications of Machine Learning SMART USAGE OF MULTIPLE RAT IN IOT-ORIENTED 5G NETWORKS: AREINFORCEMENT LEARNING APPROACH MESSAGE COLLISION IDENTIFICATION APPROACH USING MACHINE LEARNING OPTICAL FLOW BASED LEARNING APPROACH FOR ABNORMAL CROWD ACTIVITYDETECTION WITH MOTION DESCRIPTOR MAP Session 6 – Social, Legal and Ethical Aspects in Machine Learning A GENDERED PERSPECTIVE ON ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ETHICAL FRAMEWORK FOR MACHINE LEARNING UNDECLARED CONSTRUCTIONS: A GOVERNMENT’S SUPPORT DEEP LEARNINGSOLUTION FOR AUTOMATIC CHANGE DETECTION Abstracts Index of Authors
Language:English
Score: 903228.9 - https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/it...-PROC-KALEI-2018-TOC-HTM-E.htm
Data Source: un
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL ON VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN
Research has demonstrated that the most commonly reported problems fall into three categories: behavioural and emotional, cognitive and attitudinal, and long-term problems.28 50. (...) For example, in various studies it has been reported that neglected children are more likely to suffer from behavioural, cognitive and internalizing problems, as well as physical and mental health problems.30 52. (...) As regards impairments to cognitive functioning, evidence shows that physical punishment negatively impacts intellectual learning.
Language:English
Score: 902839.55 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...get?open&DS=A/HRC/43/39&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Better cognition in later life has been associated with higher levels of education.29,30 Our urban sample had much more formal education than the rural sample, which may explain the higher levels of cognitive functioning among the urban older adults. (...) Residential mobility and cognitive function among middle-aged and older adults in China. (...) Rural-urban differences in the prevalence of cognitive impairment in independent community-dwelling elderly residents of Ojiya city, Niigata Prefecture, Japan.
Language:English
Score: 901174.2 - https://www.un.org/development..._egm_201902_s5_karlpeltzer.pdf
Data Source: un
How can we imagine and promote the idea of ‘purposeful leisure’? Cognitive/ Psychological Implications The new ways that children and young people interact with technology has implications to our core physiology and psychology. This work will entail an exploration of what these implications are, looking into questions around: What AI does to the brain - what happens when we hand over cognitive tasks to AI, what are the implications of the attention economy? What are the psychological implications - depression, anxiety, social skills? Cognitive Manipulation - what does it mean to use AI to direct or control children’s behavior?
Language:English
Score: 900781.5 - https://www.unicef.org/innovat...I_Short%20Verson%20%283%29.pdf
Data Source: un
REPORT OF THE INDEPENDENT EXPERT ON THE ENJOYMENT OF ALL HUMAN RIGHTS BY OLDER PERSONS : NOTE / BY THE SECRETARIAT
Memory and communication applications can support older persons’ cognitive capacity and by extension their independent living. 27. (...) Particular safeguards are required for people with severe cognitive difficulties, including older persons with dementia. (...) Rather than restricting their rights, assistive devices should therefore provide older persons with cognitive impairments the support necessary to enable them to exercise their rights.
Language:English
Score: 899395.4 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...get?open&DS=A/HRC/36/48&Lang=E
Data Source: ods