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PUBLIC MEETING: FRIDAY, 13 SEPTEMBER 2019 - AM
The High Court had ruled that disability, including cognitive disability, did not mean that a child was not capable of giving informed consent. (...) It was necessary to acknowledge the limitations and barriers associated with cognitive impairments in order to ensure that human rights were realized for all people, including those with cognitive disabilities. 15. (...) The Principles recognized the rights of, and identified safeguards for, persons with cognitive or mental health impairments deemed unfit to plead or found not guilty by reason of cognitive or mental health impairment.
Language:English
Score: 898734.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...t?open&DS=CRPD/C/SR.500&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Thursday 27.10.2011 09:00-10:30 LabSpace #4 Standardisation in Practice Technical Symposium Session PRESENTATIONS: * Massive Deployment of Small Coverage Area Cells in the all-IP Wireless System * Interference Study for Cognitive LTE-Femtocell to Opportunistically Access TVWS * Femtocell Coverage Optimization Using Genetic Algorithm Small coverage area cells such as femtocells are expected to be widely deployed in future wireless networks to enhance indoor radio coverage and system capacity in enterprises and hotspots. (...) And femtocells that cognitively access the white spaces in TV bands could provide promising indoor coverage solutions.
Language:English
Score: 898273.2 - https://www.itu.int/wftp3/Publ..._E/web/WebSearch/page0052.html
Data Source: un
THE DUTCH ANNUAL BUSINESS INQUIRY : DEVELOPING AND TESTING THE ELECTRONIC FORM : INVITED PAPER / SUBMITTED BY STATISTICS NETHERLANDS
These interviews were carried out by testers from the CBS cognitive lab in cooperation with business interviewers. (...) Response Strategies for Coping with the Cognitive Demands of Attitude Measures in Surveys. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 5, pp. 213-236. Punselie, R. (2003).
Language:English
Score: 898121.1 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...get?open&DS=CES/2005/16&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Cognitive Science in the classroom Skip to main content Toggle navigation Building peace in the minds of men and women Member states Staff Search form Search Search English English Français Main shared menu In brief Introducing UNESCO Mission and Mandate UNESCO House Strategic Transformation Portal Who's Who? Director-General Governance Transparency Internal Oversight Service Key Figures & Budget Funding needs & data What we do Expertise Education Culture Natural Sciences Social and Human Sciences Communication & Information Major Initiatives Revive the Spirit of Mosul Futures of Education Fostering freedom of expression Building knowledge societies Sustainable Cities Preventing violent extremism Our commitment to biodiversity Advancing the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda Specialized Areas Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Global Education Monitoring Report Global Priorities Africa Gender Equality Where we work Member States Field Offices National Commissions Ocean & Climate Platform Networks International Coalition of Inclusive and Sustainable Cities – ICCAR UNESCO Associated Schools Network Education for Sustainable Development Network UNITWIN – UNESCO Chairs UNEVOC - International Centre for Technical and Vocational Education and Training Institutes UIS - UNESCO Institute for Statistics IIEP - International Institute for Educational Planning ICTP - International Centre for Theoretical Physics UIL - Institute for Lifelong Learning IBE - International Bureau of Education IICBA - International Institute for Capacity-Building in Africa IITE - Institute for Information Technologies in Education IESALC - International Institute for Higher Education in Latin America and the Caribbean MGIEP - Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Education for Peace and Sustainable Development Partners Introducing Partnerships Public partners Business, cities, young people UNESCO family partners and networks NGO's and Foundations Goodwill Ambassadors Join us Careers Procurement Fellowships Internship Resources For Journalists: Press room For Delegates: UNESCO.int Documents & Publications - UNESDOC Online Bookshop The UNESCO Courier Conventions Official Photos UNESCO Lists World Heritage Intangible Cultural Heritage Creative Cities Memory of the World Register Biosphere Reserves UNESCO Global Geoparks UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger Data and Statistics UNESCO Institute for Statistics Observatory of Killed Journalists World Inequality Database on Education Transparency portal Archives UNESCO Archives Digital Archives Library UNESCO Library UNESDOC Digital Library Multimedia collections Cognitive Science in the classroom × When : from Thursday 28 March, 2019 09:00 to Saturday 30 March, 2019 17:55 Type of event : Category 3- Non-governmental conference Where : UNESCO Headquarters, 125 avenue de Suffren, 75007, Paris, France Brain plasticity, nutrition, quality of sleep, emotional regulation, attention, prediction, error correction are all necessary elements of learning, not only from early childhood but throughout our lives. Could the advances made by cognitive science research elicit new teaching methods which would allow every child to fulfill their intellectual and emotional potential?
Language:English
Score: 897473.1 - https://en.unesco.org/events/cognitive-science-classroom
Data Source: un
TDR | Surviving severe malaria – looking at the long-term impact on childhood disability Skip to main content Access Home Alt+0 Navigation Alt+1 Content Alt+2 Search Search the WHO .int site Submit Advanced search Navigation Home News About us Research for implementation Strengthening Research Capacity Grants Publications & resources Global Engagement and Partnerships Diseases & topics Research on neglected priority needs, including product R&D, evaluation in real life settings, and increasing access to new tools Developing research leadership through education, training, networks and quality management Assessing global research needs and priorities, providing knowledge management and support for partner coordination All the calls for research and training grants, career development fellowships and how to apply Read, download or order TDR's publications and multimedia resources For the latest news, press releases and TDR events For more on TDR's strategy, governance, history and to find our staff For more on TDR partnerships and networks Menu News Latest news Surviving severe malaria – looking at the long-term impact on childhood disability TDR news item 12 September 2012 A large study to look at long-term neurological and cognitive impacts on children who survived severe malaria has begun. (...) At the time of the original study, the children were between 6 months and 6 years; most children are now over 8 years of age when their cognitive performance, language, visual skills, memory and executive function can be assessed. (...) For more information, please contact Dr Melba Gomes Telephone: +41 22 791 3813 E-mail: [email protected] Related links More on Study 13 More on TDR malaria research More on TDR malaria More on Malaria Canadian scheme aims to cut child deaths and enhance cognitive growth You are here: TDR News and events 2012 News and press releases © WHO 2022 More about our sponsors Contact us Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR)
Language:English
Score: 897473.1 - https://www.who.int/tdr/news/2012/surviving_malaria/en/
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Press release Nearly 19 million newborns at risk of brain damage every year due to iodine deficiency UNICEF and GAIN urge immediate action to increase access to iodized salt amid longstanding evidence on how deficiency reduces cognitive ability 01 March 2018 UNICEF/UNI12403/Holmes NEW YORK, 1 March 2018 – Nearly 19 million babies born globally every year – 14 per cent – are at risk of permanent yet preventable brain damage and reduced cognitive function due to a lack of iodine in the earliest years of life, according to a new joint report by UNICEF and GAIN released today. (...) This translates into major losses in the cognitive capital of entire nations and thus their socio-economic development.  (...) Every dollar spent on salt iodization is estimated to return US $30 through increased future cognitive ability. While South Asia is home to the largest proportion of babies at risk globally, the region has the second highest iodized salt coverage rate at 87 per cent of the population, preceded by East Asia and the Pacific at 91 per cent coverage.
Language:English
Score: 897073.6 - https://www.unicef.org/eca/pre...brain-damage-iodine-deficiency
Data Source: un
Slide 1 Human Factors Engineering at the Transportation Security Administration Office of Security Capabilities/ Human Factors Engineering Slide 2 AGENDA •Human Factors at TSA •Human Factors in the Airport Checkpoint Environment •Current Efforts •New TSA Initiatives •Questions HUMAN FACTORS AT TSA Slide 3 Slide 4 HUMAN FACTORS AT TSA  Enhance safety and usability when the human interacts with their work environment  Provide design criteria to guide HFE implementation  Enhance transportation security and performance by providing input to the design of:  Human-centered automation and interfaces that help prevent operator error and provide for error prevention, enhance detection,  Decision support tools  Training  Team and organizational practices  Maintain vigilance and identify fatigue onsets  Develop tools and metrics for the evaluation of human performance  Advance the fundamental understanding of how screeners process information, make decisions and collaborate with colleagues, passengers, and systems Goals of Human Factors Engineering TSA’s Human Factors (HF) engineers provide input on how to improve operational performance with the end user in mind, thus improving efficiency and effectiveness Understanding and maximizing human perceptual capabilities, cognition, image interpretation, and decision making strategies with empirically validated data will inform technology decisions, procedures, training, and overall optimize human performance. (...) The system to be described for the purposes of this brief is the passenger screening checkpoint at the airport. • The checkpoint environment is a noisy, bustling, often space-constrained, crowded airport, where the passengers are not always amenable to the procedures being carried out by the Officers on behalf of TSA • The Officer positions from Travel Document Checker through to Dynamic Officer form a cohesive team of security personnel, augmented with hardware and software contained in the deployed technology at the checkpoint • Human factors engineers at TSA are concerned with common problems in the human / system interface: cognitive processing demands, fatigue, scheduling, team performance, ergonomics, and control and display design System Overview Slide 6 Human Factors research at TSA is designed to optimize the interactions between the user and the system. (...) A system includes: • End-Users • Equipment • Tools and Procedures • Environment • Individual Characteristics • Group Characteristics • Organizational Characteristics HUMAN FACTORS AND TSA SYSTEMS CURRENT EFFORTS Slide 8 CURRENT EFFORTS Human Factors projects focus on improving threat detection, identifying commonalities across the architecture, and delivering innovative screening technologies to the field Slide 9 PATT • The Pat-down Accuracy Training Tool (PATT) is life sized mannequin with embedded pressure sensors specifically designed to provide TSOs with objective feedback regarding their ability to apply the appropriate amount of pressure and coverage needed to detect prohibited items during a pat-down exam Project Description Benefits / Outcomes/Efficiencies • Improved passenger experience • Objective customized training exercises • Increased ability to detect threats and PBIEDs • Improved confidence while conducting pat-downs Remote Screening • This project will research innovative operational concepts aimed at streamlining TSO work processes, while eliminating bias, improving human performance, and reducing error • Increased optimization of TSO resources. • Reduced cognitive load of TSOs • Streamline TSO work processes • Eliminate bias • Improve human performance and reduce error Performance Decrement • Research will investigate how long TSOs can assess images and render an accurate decision before a decrement in performance occurs • Performance decrement is defined as the point where a TSO’s ability to perform at their optimal level begins to decrease • Identified / verified duty cycles, resulting in optimized human performance, increased threat detection, and security effectiveness • Improved cognitive workload for TSOs / reduction in TSO fatigue • Reduced human error Designated Research Airports • The DRA effort establishes working “designated research areas” within at least one airport in each of the 7 regions in which to conduct Human Factors research and Operational Test and Evaluation • Ability to support defined test objectives • Demographic diversity will provide more robust and valid data • Timely data collection which will enhance budget and schedule constraints CURRENT EFFORTS CONTINUED In order to optimize current and future TSO and system capabilities, assessments need to be made of current capabilities in the areas of technology, processes, and procedures across the system.
Language:English
Score: 897073.6 - https://www.icao.int/Meetings/...entations/Bonnie%20Kudrick.pdf
Data Source: un
The Guidelines provide the knowledge base for health-care providers to advise patients on what they can do to help prevent cognitive decline and dementia. They will also be useful for governments, policy-makers and planning authorities to guide them in developing policy and designing programmes that encourage healthy lifestyles. (...) Dementia: a rapidly growing public health problem Dementia is an illness characterized by a deterioration in cognitive function beyond what might be expected from normal ageing. (...) Subscribe to our newsletters → Media Contacts Alison Brunier Communications Officer World Health Organization Mobile: +41 79 701 9480 Email: [email protected] Tarik Jasarevic Spokesperson / Media Relations WHO Telephone: +41227915099 Mobile: +41793676214 Email: [email protected] Related Guidelines on risk reduction of cognitive decline and dementia More on dementia   Fact sheets Dementia 2 September 2021 Facts in pictures Dementia 27 January 2021 Regions Africa Americas Eastern Mediterranean Europe South-East Asia Western Pacific Policies Cyber security Ethics Permissions and licensing Preventing sexual exploitation Terms of use About us Careers Library Procurement Publications Frequently asked questions Contact us Subscribe to our newsletters Privacy Legal Notice © 2022 WHO
Language:English
Score: 897073.6 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...ps-reduce-the-risk-of-dementia
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Press release Nearly 19 million newborns at risk of brain damage every year due to iodine deficiency UNICEF and GAIN urge immediate action to increase access to iodized salt amid longstanding evidence on how deficiency reduces cognitive ability 01 March 2018 UNICEF/2016/RLemoyne NEW YORK, 1 March 2018  – Nearly 19 million babies born globally every year – 14 per cent – are at risk of permanent yet preventable brain damage and reduced cognitive function due to a lack of iodine in the earliest years of life, according to a new joint report by UNICEF and GAIN released today. (...) This translates into major losses in the cognitive capital of entire nations and thus their socio-economic development. (...) Every dollar spent on salt iodization is estimated to return US $30 through increased future cognitive ability. While South Asia is home to the largest proportion of babies at risk globally, the region has the second highest iodized salt coverage rate at 87 per cent of the population, preceded by East Asia and the Pacific at 91 per cent coverage.
Language:English
Score: 897073.6 - https://www.unicef.org/rosa/pr...ery-year-due-iodine-deficiency
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Press release Nearly 19 million newborns at risk of brain damage every year due to iodine deficiency UNICEF and GAIN urge immediate action to increase access to iodized salt amid longstanding evidence on how deficiency reduces cognitive ability 01 March 2018 UNICEF Available in: Türkçe English NEW YORK, 1 March 2018  – Nearly 19 million babies born globally every year – 14 per cent – are at risk of permanent yet preventable brain damage and reduced cognitive function due to a lack of iodine in the earliest years of life, according to a new joint report by UNICEF and GAIN released today. (...) This translates into major losses in the cognitive capital of entire nations and thus their socio-economic development.   (...) Every dollar spent on salt iodization is estimated to return US $30 through increased future cognitive ability.   While South Asia is home to the largest proportion of babies at risk globally, the region has the second highest iodized salt coverage rate at 87 per cent of the population, preceded by East Asia and the Pacific at 91 per cent coverage.
Language:English
Score: 897073.6 - https://www.unicef.org/turkey/en/node/2501
Data Source: un