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His father died of liver cancer, most likely caused by undiagnosed hepatitis. (...) Without treatment, up to 3 in 10 chronically infected people will go on to develop life-threatening illnesses like cirrhosis and liver cancer. Liver cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed in Chinese males, and one of the top five most common cancers in females. (...) The Western Pacific Regional Action Plan for Viral Hepatitis lays out a systematic approach to combat hepatitis infection, and prevent avoidable deaths.
Language:English
Score: 991008.6 - https://www.who.int/macaochina...with-hepatitis-don-t-be-afraid
Data Source: un
His father died of liver cancer, most likely caused by undiagnosed hepatitis. (...) Without treatment, up to 3 in 10 chronically infected people will go on to develop life-threatening illnesses like cirrhosis and liver cancer. Liver cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed in Chinese males, and one of the top five most common cancers in females. (...) The Western Pacific Regional Action Plan for Viral Hepatitis lays out a systematic approach to combat hepatitis infection, and prevent avoidable deaths.
Language:English
Score: 991008.6 - https://www.who.int/hongkongch...with-hepatitis-don-t-be-afraid
Data Source: un
STRENGTHENING OF THE COORDINATION OF HUMANITARIAN AND DISASTER RELIEF ASSISTANCE OF THE UNITED NATIONS, INCLUDING SPECIAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE: STRENGTHENING OF INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION AND COORDINATION OF EFFORTS TO STUDY, MITIGATE AND MINIMIZE THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE CHERNOBYL DISASTER : REPORT OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
Incidence of thyroid cancer 32. All three countries have experienced dramatic increases in the incidence of thyroid cancer in children and this increase has been particularly severe in Belarus. 33. (...) The diagnosis and treatment of diseases associated with the Chernobyl disaster and the creation of a public health infrastructure capable of tracking and combating the future development of Chernobyl-related health problems have been pursued to the extent that contributions have allowed. (...) These organizations prepare and implement the various assistance and research projects of the United Nations system to combat the consequences of the Chernobyl accident. 68.
Language:English
Score: 989531.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...sf/get?open&DS=A/50/418&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
SUMMARY RECORD OF THE 343RD MEETING, HELD AT HEADQUARTERS, NEW YORK, ON FRIDAY, 11 JULY 1997 : COMMITTEE ON THE ELIMINATION OF DISCRIMINATION AGAINST WOMEN, 17TH SESSION
MULHEIMS (Luxembourg) noted that The Hague Ministerial Declaration on European Guidelines for Effective Measures to Prevent and Combat Trafficking in /... CEDAW/C/SR.343 English Page 7 Women for the Purpose of Sexual Exploitation, adopted by a Ministerial Conference of the European Union in April 1997, had been circulated to the Committee. (...) Within the framework of the European Union, her country was a member of Europol, a major network to combat trafficking in women. The question of quotas for the granting of residence permits to non-nationals of European Union member States was a difficult one and her Government would probably provide detailed information on the matter in its next report. (...) In its efforts to integrate foreign women into Luxembourg society and combat trafficking in persons and prostitution, Luxembourg would take into account all the suggestions that had been made by the Committee’s experts. 61.
Language:English
Score: 989118.4 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...?open&DS=CEDAW/C/SR.343&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
One major conclusion is that transnational organized crime markets are global in scale; strategies to address them should also be global. [5] The principles of combating transnational organized crime also apply to the illicit tobacco trade: the global scope and multifaceted nature of the illicit tobacco trade require a coordinated international response. (...) If most of the source, transit and destination countries ratify the Protocol, the illicit cigarette market is expected to be reduced significantly. [8] 6.2 Combating illicit trade requires a better understanding of its scope Parties should not rely on tobacco industry estimates for measuring the illicit market in their country. (...) A methodological guide for understanding and measuring cigarette-tax avoidance and evasion was developed in 2015 by Tobacconomics and may help Parties to undertake such reports. [10] 6.3 The tobacco industry is not a partner in implementing the Protocol In the Preamble to the Protocol, Parties are reminded “to be alert to any efforts by the tobacco industry to undermine or subvert strategies to combat illicit trade in tobacco products and the need to be informed of activities of the tobacco industry that have a negative impact on strategies to combat illicit trade in tobacco products”.
Language:English
Score: 987452 - https://www.who.int/fctc/protocol/faq/en/index1.html
Data Source: un
In 2013, WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) determined definitively that air pollution is carcinogenic to humans, contributing significantly to the incidence of lung cancer. The latest reports provide more evidence regarding the link between exposure to air pollution, both outdoor and indoor, and non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease (including ischemic heart disease and stroke) and cancer. Addressing air pollution effectively will help in reducing the health burden from non-communicable diseases, which are a particularly significant challenge in the Western Pacific Region. (...) “Many countries are finally stepping up their actions to combat air pollution,” noted Dr Nasir Hassan, Team Leader, Environmental Health, WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific.
Language:English
Score: 986457.6 - https://www.who.int/australia/...ealth-impacts-of-air-pollution
Data Source: un
In 2013, WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) determined definitively that air pollution is carcinogenic to humans, contributing significantly to the incidence of lung cancer. The latest reports provide more evidence regarding the link between exposure to air pollution, both outdoor and indoor, and non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease (including ischemic heart disease and stroke) and cancer. Addressing air pollution effectively will help in reducing the health burden from non-communicable diseases, which are a particularly significant challenge in the Western Pacific Region. (...) “Many countries are finally stepping up their actions to combat air pollution,” noted Dr Nasir Hassan, Team Leader, Environmental Health, WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific.
Language:English
Score: 986457.6 - https://www.who.int/republicof...ealth-impacts-of-air-pollution
Data Source: un
In 2013, WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) determined definitively that air pollution is carcinogenic to humans, contributing significantly to the incidence of lung cancer. The latest reports provide more evidence regarding the link between exposure to air pollution, both outdoor and indoor, and non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease (including ischemic heart disease and stroke) and cancer. Addressing air pollution effectively will help in reducing the health burden from non-communicable diseases, which are a particularly significant challenge in the Western Pacific Region. (...) “Many countries are finally stepping up their actions to combat air pollution,” noted Dr Nasir Hassan, Team Leader, Environmental Health, WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific.
Language:English
Score: 986457.6 - https://www.who.int/japan/news...ealth-impacts-of-air-pollution
Data Source: un
In 2013, WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) determined definitively that air pollution is carcinogenic to humans, contributing significantly to the incidence of lung cancer. The latest reports provide more evidence regarding the link between exposure to air pollution, both outdoor and indoor, and non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease (including ischemic heart disease and stroke) and cancer. Addressing air pollution effectively will help in reducing the health burden from non-communicable diseases, which are a particularly significant challenge in the Western Pacific Region. (...) “Many countries are finally stepping up their actions to combat air pollution,” noted Dr Nasir Hassan, Team Leader, Environmental Health, WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific.
Language:English
Score: 986457.6 - https://www.who.int/laos/news/...ealth-impacts-of-air-pollution
Data Source: un
That is a huge health burden – and a huge human cost. Cancer is currently the number three cause of mortality in Lao PDR. (...) A preliminary assessment conducted by WHO suggests around 41% of cancer deaths here are from liver cancer (2). Most of these liver cancer deaths are due to chronic viral hepatitis infection. (...) One of its targets calls for specific action to combat viral hepatitis – in order to achieve hepatitis elimination by 2030.
Language:English
Score: 985997.7 - https://www.who.int/laos/news/...wr-on-world-hepatitis-day-2019
Data Source: un