Home

Results 31 - 40 of 61,328 for complication. Search took 1.464 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
New evidence synthesis reveals however, that in many health-care settings across the world, women with life-threatening maternal complications are given poor quality medicines – putting their lives and well-being at grave risk. (...) Preventable with the right treatment Frequent life-threatening maternal complications include post-partum haemorrhage, pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, and sepsis. (...) Poster Quality of medicines for life-threatening pregnancy complications in low- and middle-income countries: A systematic review .
Language:English
Score: 723840 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...ives-of-pregnant-women-at-risk
Data Source: un
Data collected included demographics, indications for the FGM procedure, type of closure of the labia, and intraoperative and postoperative complications. All of the women either had symptoms or had requested defibulation. (...) None of the women had intraoperative or postoperative complications. Of the 32 patients reached by telephone, 94% stated that they would highly recommend defibulation to others. (...) The researchers conclude by recommending defibulation for all infibulated women who suffer long-term complications as a result. The complication rates of defibulation are reported to be minimal, while satisfaction rates among patients and their husbands are high.
Language:English
Score: 723285.94 - https://www.who.int/reproducti.../fgm/defibulation_type_iii/en/
Data Source: un
Over 500,000 die each year from pregnancy-related complications. • For every woman who dies, another 30 women suffer long-lasting injury or illness that can result in life long pain, disability and socio-economic exclusion. • More than 99% of maternal deaths occur in poor countries, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. • Less than 60% of all women in developing countries and only 34% in the least developed countries have access to a skilled professional when giving birth, and even fewer are delivering in a health facility providing skilled care. • Pregnancy and childbirth and their consequences are still the leading causes of death, disease and disability among women of reproductive age in developing countries. • The risk of a woman dying as a result of pregnancy or childbirth complication during her lifetime is about 1 in 7 in Afghanistan and Sierra Leone compared with about 1 in 29,800 in Sweden. CAUSES OF MATERNAL DEATH The lion’s share of maternal deaths (80%) is due to direct causes—consequences of pregnancy related complications, or caused by interventions, omissions, incorrect treatment or events that result from these complications. (...) Quality control and transport to obstetric emergency care in case of complications is also needed. This implies strengthening health systems. • Political commitment is needed at the highest level to give the necessary leadership and momentum to make it a government priority to protect and promote the health and well-being of all women and children.
Language:English
Score: 723285.94 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/acti...dn_fs_maternalmortalityrev.pdf
Data Source: un
AN ADDITIONAL 2.6 MILLION BABIES ARE STILLBORN AND NEARLY 300,000 WOMEN DIE DUE TO COMPLICATIONS OF PREGNANCY AND CHILDBIRTH. 4 Of these neonatal deaths, two-thirds occur in just 10 countries, with India accounting for more than a quarter and Nigeria for about a tenth.5 Preterm Birth Antenatal corticosteroids and preterm labor management Essential newborn care – hygienic care, thermal care, support for breastfeeding Kangaroo mother care Birth Complications Essential newborn care and resuscitation, as appropriate Newborn Infection Prevention – essential newborn care, especially breastfeeding, and chlorhexidine where appropriate Case management of neonatal sepsis with antibiotics • complications from prematurity • complications around the time of birth • neonatal infections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45% 71% of newborn deaths are preventable with basic low-tech interventions.7
Language:English
Score: 722191.2 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/medi...ents/2015/newborn_survival.pdf
Data Source: un
“Thanks to the mentorship programme, if I have any complicated case that I am not sure of, most of my mentors are just a phone call away. (...) “Thanks to the mentorship programme, if I have any complicated case that I am not sure of, most of my mentors are just a phone call away. (...) But with Rudo’s child this did not happen.”  “One of the complications I used to face in such cases as Rudo’s is tearing.
Language:English
Score: 722047.56 - https://www.unicef.org/zimbabw...stories/healthy-baby-girl-rudo
Data Source: un
The aim of this study was to examine the risk of perinatal complications among women of Somali origin compared with ethnic Norwegians[1]. (...) The researchers concluded that infibulations could have played a role in the perinatal complications experienced by the Somali women, since most Somali women in Norway have been found to have undergone this type of FGM. (...) Vangen S, Stoltenberg C, Johansen EB et al. Perinatal complications among ethnic Somalis in Norway. Acta Obstetricia at Gynecologica Scandinavica 2002; 81:317322.
Language:English
Score: 719811.8 - https://www.who.int/reproducti...ics/fgm/fgm_somalis_Norway/en/
Data Source: un
Procedures can cause death, severe bleeding, problems urinating, and later cysts, infections, complications in childbirth and increased risk of newborn deaths. (...) They must know how to recognize and tackle health complications of FGM,” says Dr Flavia Bustreo, WHO Assistant Director General. (...) A global goal More research and better quality data are needed to improve evidence-based care, so that health professionals can better manage the complications arising from female genital mutilation.
Language:English
Score: 719671.4 - https://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/news/fgm/en/
Data Source: un
•Medication •Monitoring of control •Screening for complications -- ongoing Primary Prevention Secondary & Tertiary Prevention 9 Start pilot / ATC training DM 2 detected Career end point Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 8 to 10 years ? (...) N Engl J Med. 2014;370:1514-1523 http://www.medscape.com/news 14 Better Diabetes Control, Fewer Complications After publication of the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) 21 years ago — which showed that intensive glycemic control reduced microvascular complications in type 1 diabetes — and subsequent studies that showed the control of blood pressure, glucose, and lipid levels could reduce complications in type 2 diabetes, care for adults with diabetes has improved substantially, the authors write. (...) Although rates of all 5 complications declined, the magnitude of reduction was greatest for CVD, particularly acute MI, which has historically been the most common diabetes-related complication but is now about as common as stroke, Dr.
Language:English
Score: 715953.9 - https://www.icao.int/safety/av...20Dr%20Jarnail%20Singh)%20.pdf
Data Source: un
While tobacco smokers face a significantly higher risk of post-surgical complications, including impaired heart and lung functions, infections and delayed wound healing, evidence from a new joint study by the World Health Organization ( WHO ), the University of Newcastle, Australia and the World Federation of Societies of Anesthesiologists reveals that patients who quit smoking are less likely to experience complications with anesthesia than those who do not.  (...) The Nicotine and carbon monoxide present in cigarettes can decrease oxygen levels and greatly increase risk of heart-related complications after surgery. Tobacco also damages lungs, making it difficult for the proper amount of air to flow through – increasing the risk of post-surgical lung complications. (...) Smoking just one cigarette decreases the body’s ability to deliver necessary nutrients for healing after surgery. “Complications after surgery present a large burden for both the health care provider and the patient”, explained Shams Syed, Coordinator, Quality of Care, WHO, adding that “primary care physicians, surgeons, nurses and families are important in supporting a patient to quit smoking at every stage of care, especially before an operation”. 
Language:English
Score: 713957.03 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2020/01/1055591
Data Source: un
Checklist helps reduce surgical complications, deaths Global Regions WHO Regional websites Africa Americas South-East Asia Europe Eastern Mediterranean Western Pacific When autocomplete results are available use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. (...) Analysis shows that the rate of major complications following surgery fell from 11% in the baseline period to 7% after introduction of the checklist, a reduction of one third. (...) The reductions in complications proved to be of equal magnitude in high and lower income sites in the study.
Language:English
Score: 713957.03 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...-surgical-complications-deaths
Data Source: un