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A key mechanism for us is through consumer awareness and education initiatives. Importantly, for Vanuatu, awareness and educational information mechanisms must be targeted at a level of understanding for the consumers. (...) A key message of the CAPP 2014 is promotion of consumer rights and responsibilities for consumer empowerment. A successful model developed by TRR is to appoint and utilize “Consumer Champions.”  TRR recognizes and promotes that consumer protection is also a responsibility of consumers themselves, who have both rights and obligations to meet to contribute to a safe and secure digital environment.  Partnerships at the national level are critical for educating and empowering consumers at all levels.
Language:English
Score: 654355.4 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/C...20Contribution_TTR_Vanuatu.pdf
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Instruments & Resources in place  Telecommunications and Radio communications Regulation Act 2009;  Part 8 of the Act – Customer Relations & Protection  TRR Consumer Protection Regulation;  detail specific objectives that TRR sets for Service Providers as a guide to customer requirements that operators need to meet  TRR Consumer Awareness and Protection Plan  TRR Community Consumer Champions in each province  TRR website www.trr.vu – Consumer Protection Menu  Advertising Guideline  Consumer Complaints Handling Guidelines  TRR responsibilities:  TRR taking a leading role in promoting Consumer Protection & Awareness http://www.trr.vu/ Complaint procedure Refer Consumer Complaints Handling Guideline on www.trr.vu  TRR issue this Guideline in accordance to Part 8 of Telecommunication and Radio communication Regulation Act  Consumer must first addressed their compliant to their Concerned service Provider within 5 working days. (...) If however problem is not solved within 5 days consumer may bring the dispute to TRR attention  TRR will not Accept Complaint Unless consumer is not satisfied with Solution presented by service provider  Un resolved complaint by the service provider are now considered as Dispute. TRR through the Consumer affairs officer or Team will investigate and mediate between Complainant and servicer provider http://www.trr.vu/ Continue Complaint procedure  Consumer will required to fill in the complaint form attached the previous correspondence with the service provider on the complaint  TRR will attempt to investigate and mediate and resolved the dispute between the two parties in an amicably manner.
Language:English
Score: 654182.57 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/R...16/Mar-ITU-TRAI/S6_Vanuatu.pdf
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 Page 7 - FIGI - Big data, machine learning, consumer protection and privacy           Basic HTML Version Table of Contents View Full Version Page 7 - FIGI - Big data, machine learning, consumer protection and privacy P. 7 Contents Acknowledgements 3 Executive Summary 6 Acronyms 8 1 Introduction 9 2 Understanding big data, consumer protection and data privacy 12 2.1 What are big data and machine learning? (...) ..........................................................15 2.4 What is consumer protection? ........................................................................................15 2.5 What is data privacy? ......................................................................................................... 17 3 The pre-engagement phase: consumer protection and privacy challenges of notice and consent 19 3.1 Notifying consumers and obtaining their consent to use personal data ........19 3.2 The challenge in the context of big data ..................................................................... 21 4 The engagement phase: consumer protection and privacy in the operation of AI-driven services 23 4.1 Accuracy – protecting consumers from erroneous and outdated data .........23 4.2 Protecting consumers from bias and discriminatory treatment .......................25 4.3 Protecting consumers in the event of data breach and re-identification ......29 4.4 Protecting consumers in relation to the circulation of personal data about them .............................................................................................................................32 5 The post-engagement phase: accountability to consumers for problems after the fact 33 5.1 Consumer rights of access, rectification and erasure ............................................33 5.2 Providing consumers with transparency and explanations ...............................34 5.3 Empowering consumers to contest decisions .......................................................... 37 5.4 Evaluating harm and liability to consumers ..............................................................38 6 Risk management, design and ethics 39 6.1 Risk management ...............................................................................................................39 6.2 Integrating data privacy by design ................................................................................41 6.3 Ethics and self-regulation ..................................................................................................41 7 Areas for further exploration 42 Annex A (Monetary Authority of Singapore FEAT Principles) 44 Annex B (Smart Campaign Digital Credit Standards) 45 Big data, machine learning, consumer protection and privacy 5     2     3     4     5     6     7     8     9     10     11     12          
Language:English
Score: 653897.4 - https://www.itu.int/en/publica...rt/files/basic-html/page7.html
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Share × Close New partnership recognizes consumers as drivers for Zero Hunger Consumers International and FAO sign collaboration agreement to help end hunger Consumers are a vital part of the Zero Hunger equation. (...) "FAO is pleased to step up our collaboration with Consumers International because consumers are a vital part of the Zero Hunger equation. (...) Consumer power can drive change Consumers International represents more than 240 consumer rights groups in 120 countries.
Language:English
Score: 653867.14 - https://www.fao.org/newsroom/d...-as-drivers-for-Zero-Hunger/en
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Participants discussed consumer issues in the trade arena, focusing in particular on the challenges and opportunities provided by e-commerce and how the WTO can help address consumers' concerns in this area. (...) With the growth of e-commerce, consumers are becoming active participants in international trade and it is more important than ever to build a trading system that consumers can trust. These trade dialogues are a good start towards an open process that will allow consumer advocates to engage with negotiators and ensure the consumer perspective is heard."
Language:English
Score: 653805.7 - https://www.wto.org/english/ne...e/news19_e/trdia_06may19_e.htm
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Africa is a good example, in its 2004 Annual Report, Consumers Internationalii noted that:” To date, only a few African countries have enacted consumer protection legislation”. (...) Regulators act “on behalf” of the consumer and however closely they consult with them, they cannot alone represent the consumer. They are no substitute for consumers themselves having a voice. Likewise when the industry itself argues for greater competition, its interests coincide with those of consumers and its trade associations often speak up for consumers.
Language:English
Score: 653659.67 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/treg...mer/documents/Cons_summary.pdf
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Many of the consumer organisations involved do not get involved in consumer issues or case work in the telecoms and Internet sector. (...) Regulators ought to seek to work closely with consumer bodies as a way of strengthening the consumer aspects of their mandates. (...) Should they favour the consumer or industry? As regulators, they act “on behalf” of the consumer and however closely they consult with them, they cannot alone represent the consumer.
Language:English
Score: 653461.2 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/treg...ons/Russell_CconsumerdftV2.pdf
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Horton-B_Presentation.PDF INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATION UNION TELECOMMUNICATION DEVELOPMENT BUREAU Document: 28 GLOBAL SYMPOSIUM FOR REGULATORS Hong Kong, China, 7 -8 December 2002 PRESENTATION CONSUMER PROTECTION IN THE ASIA-PACIFIC REGION Dr Bob Horton Deputy Chairman Australian Communications Authority 1 Consumer Protection in theConsumer Protection in theConsumer Protection in the AsiaAsiaAsia–––Pacific RegionPacific RegionPacific Region Dr Bob Horton Deputy Chairman Australian Communications Authority Competition policy andCompetition policy and consumer protectionconsumer protection l Asia–Pacific region – diversity: cultural, geographic, economic » But – commonalities of approach to consumer protection » regulation + managed transition to liberalisation » communications-specific regulator » use of advisory committees 2 Consumer protection initiatives Consumer protection initiatives in in AsiaAsia––Pacific countriesPacific countries l Promoting consumer input into policy- making: consumer advisory forums (Australia, Hong Kong, Malaysia) l Universal service obligation to ensure supply of services to the community (Hong Kong, Pakistan, Thailand, Australia) Consumer protection initiativesConsumer protection initiatives (continued)(continued) l Regulatory initiatives—pre-selection & mobile number portability (Hong Kong, Thailand, Australia) l Devolving responsibilities to industry— standards & codes of practice (Hong Kong, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Australia) 3 Consumer protection initiativesConsumer protection initiatives (continued)(continued) l Consumer education & information programmes (China, Philippines, Singapore, Australia) l Programmes targeting Internet and e-commerce issues—privacy, fraud, cyber laws (Philippines, Sri Lanka) l Accreditation schemes for e-businesses (Singapore) The way forwardThe way forward l Information exchanges between policy makers, regulators, consumer groups and industry associations are valuable to the development of appropriate consumer protection measures – however l Economic and demographic circumstances of individual countries will also influence the approach to consumer protection 4 ConclusionsConclusions l the benefits of competition must be balanced with consumer protection regulation l self-regulatory arrangements can support consumer protection l the adequacy of consumer protection measures need to be reassessed in light of new technologies and services
Language:English
Score: 653390.6 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/treg...nts/28-Horton-Presentation.pdf
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Building confidence in a data driven economy by assuring consumer redress Building confidence in a data driven economy by assuring consumer redress 19th Global Symposium for Regulators “Managing the consumer communications process” Port Villa, Vanuatu, July 2019 Alan Horne ITU Consultant The views expressed in this presentation are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the ITU or its Membership. Financially included Consumers/Citizen/ Micro business Goods Services Utilities Companies (B2C), C2C & Local Gov. $ Consumers in the non-digital economy Home, Office, Travelling, Holiday Vulnerable, Rural Urban Media $ Consumer Data Consumer led sales Financial Service Provider (FSP) - Digital financial services (DFS) Competitive Service Providers Financially included Consumers/Citizen/ Micro business Goods Services Utilities Companies (B2C), C2C & Local Gov. $ eServices eProducts Consumers in the digital economy Home, Office, Travelling, Holiday Vulnerable, Rural Urban eCommerce $4 Trillion Social Media Media $ IOTs Advocates Ombudsman Citizens Advisers CoP Cross Sector Fora Financial Service Provider (FSP) - Digital financial services (DFS) Competitive Service Providers Regulations Financially included Consumers/Citizen/ Micro business Companies (B2C), C2C & Local Gov. $ Stakeholder in the digital economy Social Media Consumer & Industry Fora NRA $ Media Coms National Crime Agency Central GovernmentLaws/Standards Digital Minister Policies International/Re gional Bodies Judiciary Consumer Data Advocates Ombudsman Citizens Advisers Consumer led sales CoP Cross Sector Fora Financial Service Provider (FSP) - Digital financial services (DFS) Competitive Service Providers RegulationsCentral Government Financially included Consumers/Citizen/ Micro business Goods Services Utilities Companies (B2C), C2C & Local Gov. $ eServices eProducts Laws/Standards Judiciary Home, Office, Travelling, Holiday Vulnerable, Rural Urban Digital Minister Policies Social Media Consumer & Industry ForaMedia $ NRA $ Media Coms IOTs International/Re gional Bodies The digital economy National Crime Agency Consumer CONNECTIVITY FAILING FAULTY PRODUCT SERVICE COURIEER DELIVER FINANCIAL MISTAKE INAPPRORIATE CONTENT SPAMDATA IDENTITY BREACH FRAUD Key Harms in the digital economy Policies & Laws in the digital economy ADVOCACY NATIONAL REGULATIONS Finance Regulator $ Media Regulator ICT Regulator INTERNATIONAL POLICIES & RECOMMENDATIONS World Trade Organization (WTO) United Nations (UN) World Bank (WB) OECD International Organizations REGIONAL DIRECTIVES NATIONAL LAWS EDUCATION AWARENESS GUIDANCE NATIONAL STRATEGIES & POLICIES CA Regional bodies Government Government ITU Consumer AssociationsNRA GOV REDRESS PROCESS OMBUDSMAN Providers Judiciary Regional Organizations Accessible Consumers In House Complaints procedure Ombudsman Citizens Advice Judiciary National Crime Agency (NCA) Regulator Finance Regulator $ Media Regulator ICT Regulator Competition Regulator Trading Standards Trade Associations International bodies NRA & CPA in other Nations MOUs Redress in the digital economy Consumer Protection Agency Gov/Regulator Rec 10 REVIEW OF PRIORITIES Rec 1 CONVERGED CONSUMER PROTECTION Rec 2 TRUSTED INSTITUTIONS Rec 3 CYBER CRIME UNIT Rec 4 DIGITAL POLICY Rec 5 REVIEW LAWS Rec 6 HOLISTIC EDUCATION Rec 7 DIGITAL HEROES Rec 8 CITIZANS ADVICE Rec 9 CODE OF PRACTICE Rec 11 CONVERGE/COOPER ATE Rec 13 INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION Recommendations – Collaborative Regulations Rec 12 CONSULTATION Conclusions • Digital economy international - complex • Significant benefits, significant harms • Consumer protection/redress - complex • International harmonised standards, policies, laws, processes - essential • National collaborative regulation • Consumer trusted advisor • NRA at the centre of complex web Building confidence in a data driven economy by assuring consumer redress Slide Number 2 Slide Number 3 Slide Number 4 Slide Number 5 Slide Number 6 Slide Number 7 Slide Number 8 Slide Number 9 Conclusions
Language:English
Score: 653118.26 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-D/C...ta%20driven%20economy%20by.pdf
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Microsoft PowerPoint - Rosalind Stevens Strohmann_Slides.ppt 1 Quality of ServiceQuality of Service and Consumerand Consumer Protection in Protection in an NGN Worldan NGN World Rosalind Stevens-Strohmann Consumer Policy Manager Ofcom, United Kingdom ©Ofcom 1 Consumer Policy – Balancing consumer protection with consumer empowerment • Deployment of NGN provides new opportunities to increase consumer choice but raises new challenges for QoS and consumer protection • Challenge for regulators is to:- – Empower consumers by equipping them with the skills and information they need to get the best deal they can. – Protect consumers against various kinds of harm eg SPIT, fraud and identity theft, mis-use of personal information, etc. 2 ©Ofcom 2 Regulatory approaches to QoS Enforcement approach NRA defines QoS parameters, sets standards, actively monitors and enforces For example: Waiting list for main lines % of faults cleared by next working day % of failed calls Number of main line faults % of operator service calls answered in 15 seconds Number of complaints per 1000 bills Customer satisfaction rate (ITU indicators) In reality most regulators use a mixture of both Encouragement approach - NRA relies on competition and publicity to help consumers make informed choices and switch providers. www.topcomm.org.uk www.topnetuk.org ©Ofcom 3 Industry provision of comparable QoS for consumers www.topcomm.org.uk www.topnetuk.org 3 ©Ofcom 4 QoS aspects to be addressed as NGN is deployed • Service disruption during migration from PSTN to NGN • Management of end to end voice quality of service • Access to emergency services and emergency call location • Number portability • Feasibility of alternative text relay services • Differentiation of QoS • Network integrity • Network security ©Ofcom 5 Consumer dimension to net neutrality and QoS • Potential shift from “best efforts” approach to prioritisation of traffic. • How willing is the consumer to pay differential amounts for different levels of QoS – For higher bandwidth services? (...) , • Differentiation may be more efficient – consumers only pay for QoS levels that are relevant to them • Does ability to differentiate promote the innovation of new products and services? • How do you protect consumers against potential for providers to downgrade some services (eg “free” broadband) to unacceptably low levels?
Language:English
Score: 653118.26 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/treg...ssion_V_Rosalind%20Stevens.pdf
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