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Rapid market assessment - Tanzania: Cracking Tanzania's Youth Employment Conundrum Skip to main content ILO Advancing social justice, promoting decent work ILO is a specialized agency of the United Nations Countries Country data and ILO results Africa Americas Arab States Asia and the Pacific Europe and Central Asia Topics 2030 Development Agenda Apprenticeships Care Economy Child Labour Collective bargaining and labour relations Cooperatives COVID-19 Decent work Digital labour platforms Disability and work Domestic workers DW4SD Resource Platform Economic and social development Employment injury insurance and protection Employment Intensive Investment Employment promotion Employment security Equality and discrimination Fair recruitment Forced labour, human trafficking and slavery Freedom of association Future of work Gender equality Globalization Green jobs HIV and AIDS Indigenous and tribal peoples Informal economy Labour inspection and administration Labour law Labour migration Maritime Labour Convention Maternity protection Millennium Development Goals Multinational enterprises Non-standard forms of employment Poverty Rural economy Safety and health at work Skills, Knowledge and Employability Small and Medium Enterprises Social and Solidarity Economy Social dialogue and tripartism Social finance Social protection Sustainable enterprises Violence and harassment Wages Working time and work organization Work, peace and resilience Youth employment Sectors Agriculture; plantations;other rural sectors Basic Metal Production Chemical industries Commerce Construction Education Financial services; professional services Food; drink; tobacco Forestry; wood; pulp and paper Health services Hotels; tourism; catering Mining (coal; other mining) Mechanical and electrical engineering Media; culture; graphical Oil and gas production; oil refining Postal and telecommunications services Public service Shipping; ports; fisheries; inland waterways Textiles; clothing; leather; footwear Transport (including civil aviation; railways; road transport) Transport equipment manufacturing Utilities (water; gas; electricity) Search ilo.org Search ilo.org Menu Home About the ILO Newsroom Meetings and events Publications Research Labour standards Statistics and databases Contact Us ENTERPRISES About the department Areas of work Units and programmes Projects Events and meetings Publications More about us The Lab's team Contact us Follow us on Twitter Key Resources Brief A Systemic Approach to Creating More and Better Jobs Guide Value Chain Development for Decent Work Results Measurement SME Measurement Toolkit Report Business models for decent work Guide Guidelines for Value Chain Selection Guide A User-friendly guide for Market Systems Analysis Implementation Road to Jobs Afghanistan ILO home About the ILO How the ILO works Departments and offices Enterprises Department Projects THE LAB - Market systems development for decent work Cracking Tanzania's Youth Employment Conundrum ... Rapid market assessment - Tanzania Cracking Tanzania's Youth Employment Conundrum Evaluating the potential for the horticulture, tourism and apiculture value chains to promote youth employment in Tanzania. Type: Report Date issued: 28 February 2017 Contact(s): Steve Hartrich, hartrich@ilo.org Download: Cracking Tanzania's Youth Employment Conundrum pdf - 0.7 MB Short Description How can a joint UN programme better address the youth employment challenge in Tanzania?
Language:English
Score: 1057248.1 - www.ilo.org/empent/Proj...WCMS_545991/lang--en/index.htm
Data Source: un
Rapid market assessment - Tanzania: Cracking Tanzania's Youth Employment Conundrum Skip to main content ILO Advancing social justice, promoting decent work ILO is a specialized agency of the United Nations Countries Country data and ILO results Africa Americas Arab States Asia and the Pacific Europe and Central Asia Topics 2030 Development Agenda Apprenticeships Care Economy Child Labour Collective bargaining and labour relations Cooperatives COVID-19 Decent work Digital labour platforms Disability and work Domestic workers DW4SD Resource Platform Economic and social development Employment injury insurance and protection Employment Intensive Investment Employment promotion Employment security Equality and discrimination Fair recruitment Forced labour, human trafficking and slavery Freedom of association Future of work Gender equality Globalization Green jobs HIV and AIDS Indigenous and tribal peoples Informal economy Labour inspection and administration Labour law Labour migration Maritime Labour Convention Maternity protection Millennium Development Goals Multinational enterprises Non-standard forms of employment Poverty Rural economy Safety and health at work Skills, Knowledge and Employability Small and Medium Enterprises Social and Solidarity Economy Social dialogue and tripartism Social finance Social protection Sustainable enterprises Violence and harassment Wages Working time and work organization Work, peace and resilience Youth employment Sectors Agriculture; plantations;other rural sectors Basic Metal Production Chemical industries Commerce Construction Education Financial services; professional services Food; drink; tobacco Forestry; wood; pulp and paper Health services Hotels; tourism; catering Mining (coal; other mining) Mechanical and electrical engineering Media; culture; graphical Oil and gas production; oil refining Postal and telecommunications services Public service Shipping; ports; fisheries; inland waterways Textiles; clothing; leather; footwear Transport (including civil aviation; railways; road transport) Transport equipment manufacturing Utilities (water; gas; electricity) Search ilo.org Search ilo.org Menu Home About the ILO Newsroom Meetings and events Publications Research Labour standards Statistics and databases Contact Us ENTERPRISES About the department Areas of work Units and programmes Projects Events and meetings Publications More about us The Lab's team Contact us Follow us on Twitter Key Resources Brief A Systemic Approach to Creating More and Better Jobs Guide Value Chain Development for Decent Work Results Measurement SME Measurement Toolkit Report Business models for decent work Guide Guidelines for Value Chain Selection Guide A User-friendly guide for Market Systems Analysis Implementation Road to Jobs Afghanistan ILO home About the ILO How the ILO works Departments and offices Enterprises Department Projects THE LAB - Market systems development for decent work Cracking Tanzania's Youth Employment Conundrum ... Rapid market assessment - Tanzania Cracking Tanzania's Youth Employment Conundrum Evaluating the potential for the horticulture, tourism and apiculture value chains to promote youth employment in Tanzania. Type: Report Date issued: 28 February 2017 Contact(s): Steve Hartrich, hartrich@ilo.org Download: Cracking Tanzania's Youth Employment Conundrum pdf - 0.7 MB Short Description How can a joint UN programme better address the youth employment challenge in Tanzania?
Language:English
Score: 1057248.1 - https://www.ilo.org/empent/Pro...WCMS_545991/lang--en/index.htm
Data Source: un
Northeast –– TajikistanTajikistan’’s regions region In In mesozomesozo--cainozoiccainozoic and and palaeozoicpalaeozoic breeds of the region are breeds of the region are developed crackdeveloped crack--soil, crack soil, crack ––venous, coursevenous, course--pore and pore and coursecourse-- cracks waters. (...) Central--Tajik regionTajik region -- CourseCourse--pore waters of the quaternary depositpore waters of the quaternary deposit -- Cracks (course, soils, Cracks (course, soils, karstickarstic) ) mesozomesozo--cainozoiccainozoic -- Cracks (soil and sometimes Cracks (soil and sometimes karstickarstic) ) palaeozoicpalaeozoic Waters of this region is Ca, NaWaters of this region is Ca, Na-- hydrocarbonatehydrocarbonate and Ca,and Ca, NaNa--hydrosulphateshydrosulphates with the mineralization up to 1.0with the mineralization up to 1.0--1.3/dm1.3/dm33..
Language:English
Score: 1056510.4 - https://unece.org/fileadmin/DA...ndwaters%20in%20Tajikistan.pdf
Data Source: un
1 UNESCO International Symposium and Policy Forum Cracking the Code: Girls’ Education in STEM 28-30 August 2017 Bangkok, Thailand Background More female students are in school today than ever before but they do not always have equal opportunities to complete and benefit from an education of their choice. (...) Selection will be based on: participant profile, gender and geographical representation, to ensure a balanced audience. http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/3537399/Cracking-The-Code-Registration-Form http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/3537399/Cracking-The-Code-Registration-Form 3 Programme The programme of the International Symposium and Policy Forum will be based on the overarching theme of girls’ education in STEM, with four sub-themes/tracks: 1. (...) Contact information Justine Sass Chief, Section of Education for Inclusion and Gender Equality Division for Inclusion, Peace and Sustainable Development Education Sector UNESCO, 7 place Fontenoy, F-75352 Paris 07 SP Email: gender.ed@unesco.org Tel: +33 (0) 1 45 68 10 20 http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/3540409/Cracking-The-Code-Presentation-Form http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/3542924/Cracking-The-Code-Workshop-Form http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/3557888/Cracking-The-Code-Exhibition-Form 4 Annex 1: TRACKS and Thematic Areas TRACK 1: Building the foundations: Gender-responsive quality STEM education y What are effective policies to increase access to STEM education for women and girls?
Language:English
Score: 1048746.9 - https://en.unesco.org/sites/de...kok-2017-concept-note-en_1.pdf
Data Source: un
He asserts that because of cracked software, pop-ups occurred over which he had no control. (...) Even if the Applicant used cracked software or visited websites offering cracked software, this would not explain why he manually inputted the specific search terms into Google and the search engines for pornographic websites. (...) The reason for a website with cracked software is to direct a user to specific pages because that is how income is derived from the use of cracked software.
Language:English
Score: 1021260.6 - www.un.org/en/internalj...dt/judgments/undt-2018-122.pdf
Data Source: oaj
A lack of continuity between maternal and child health programmes has meant that care of the newborn has fallen through the cracks between care of the mother and care of the older child. (...) WHY HAS CARE FOR NEWBORNS FALLEN BETWEEN THE CRACKS? • Lack of continuum of care from maternal to child. A lack of continuity between maternal and child health programmes has meant that care of the newborn has fallen through the cracks. More than half the neonatal deaths occur after a home birth and without any health care. • In many countries there is no record of neonatal deaths.
Language:English
Score: 1011354.9 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/acti...ies/dn_fs_newbornmortality.pdf
Data Source: un
Road Maintenance in Lithuania Road Maintenance Contracts 2012-03-28 Performance-based Road Maintenance Contracts in Lithuania Martynas Makaravičius Engineer martynas.makaravicius@lra.lt Lithuanian Road Network 25% 69% 6% ROAD NETWORK IN LITHUANIA State Municipal Private 8% 23% 69% GROUPS OF STATE SIGNIFICANCE ROADS Main National Regional Groups of roads Length, km Total length, km Main 1 745 21 254 National 4 936 Regional 14 574 Length of state significant roads, 2014 Types of Contracts used in Road Maintenance Area Routine maintenance/ Minor periodic maintenance Road marking Periodic road maintenance Surface dressing (and other road repair works) Performance-based Unit Price Unit Price Unit Price Method-based Fixed Price Method-based Method-based Routine maintenance: • Winter service works • Patching, crack sealing • Grass mowing • Gravel road grading • Shoulders ordering • Maintenance of traffic signs and marker posts • Sweeping, litter pick-up, etc. (...) Fixed fee per km of road Routine maintenance / Minor periodic maintenance Type I Outcome-based Criteria and Performance Requirements Routine maintenance / Minor periodic maintenance Type I ROAD MAINTENANCE MANUAL Road Group Maintenance level Road must be cleaned and spreaded* Traffic may be interrupted Permissible snow height during snowfall Main I within 2 h not more than 2 h Loose snow - 4 cm Compacted snow -1 cm II within 3 h not more than 3 h Loose snow - 5 cm Compacted snow -2 cm National II within 4 h not more than 8 h Loose snow - 7 cm Compacted snow -3 cm < ... > WINTER MAINTENANCE SUMMER MAINTENANCE Road element Indicator Requirement level I level II level III Asphalt pavement Cracks Can‘t be cracks wider than: Must be repaired before: 5 mm 1st of May 10 mm 15th of May 19 mm 1st of June Potholes In spring must be repaired before: Later must be repaired within: in Main roads in National roads in Regional roads 1st of May 2 days (1 day*) 3 days (1 d*) 5 days (1 d*) 15th of May 3 days (1 d*) 5 days (1 d*) 10 days (1 d*) 1st of June 5days (1 d*) 7 days (1 d*) n/r (1 d*) *- dangerous potholes (deeper than 40 mm and larger than 0,1 m2) < ... > Routine maintenance / Minor periodic maintenance Type I Monitoring TYPE ROUTINE MAINTENANCE PERIODIC MAINTENANCE Daily Inspections Special Inspections Special Control Insp.
Language:English
Score: 1004016.6 - https://unece.org/DAM/trans/ma...aintenance_Contracts_in_LT.pdf
Data Source: un
Cracking the code | UNICEF Bhutan Skip to main content Bhutan Toggle navigation Global Links Visit UNICEF Global High contrast Bhutan Explore UNICEF About us Work with us Contact us Press centre Main navigation What we do Research and reports Stories Take action Search area has closed. (...) Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Article Cracking the code How digital skills are empowering adolescent girls in Bhutan to harness the power of technology. (...) Like education, technology is great equalizer. By cracking the code, adolescent girls have started challenging the stereotype that IT is predominantly a male domain.
Language:English
Score: 1004016.6 - https://www.unicef.org/bhutan/stories/cracking-code
Data Source: un
Cracking the “Communication Code” | UNSSC | United Nations System Staff College Skip to main content Log in Courses Find your Course Customized Services Tailor-made Learning Academic Partnerships Campuses Turin Campus Bonn Campus Virtual Campus Media Centre In Focus About Why Choose UNSSC? (...) Commercial Opportunities Search results User account menu Log in Blog 28 Apr 2022 Cracking the “Communication Code” Breadcrumb Home Media centre Blog Cracking the “Communication Code” Share on f l t If 22 years of coaching international professionals in public speaking, relationship building, conversation and presentation skills has taught me anything, it is that communication is an art. (...) There is, as you can see, much to learn about the “Communication Code” and how to develop your own way of working with this vital part of your workday. Learning how “cracking it” can save a lot of energy and help you become and even more effective UN leader.
Language:English
Score: 999946.8 - https://www.unssc.org/news-and...og/cracking-communication-code
Data Source: un
Friday’s Daily Brief: Education key for Rohingya, DR Congo violence continues, Zimbabwe protest latest, women’s rights in Iran, environmental protection | | UN News Skip to main content Welcome to the United Nations Toggle navigation Language: العربية 中文 English Français Русский Español Português Kiswahili Other Hindi हिंदी Global UN News Global perspective Human stories Search the United Nations Search Advanced Search Home Africa Americas Asia Pacific Middle East Europe UN Art and Gifts History Corner Topics Peace and Security Economic Development Humanitarian Aid Climate and Environment Human Rights UN Affairs Women Law and Crime Prevention Health Culture and Education SDGs Migrants and Refugees In depth Interviews Features Photo Stories News in Brief The Lid is On UN Gender Focus UN and Africa UN Podcasts Secretary-General Spokesperson All Statements Selected Speeches Press Encounters Official Travels Media UN Video UN Photo Meeting Coverage Media Accreditation Webtv Home Africa Americas Asia Pacific Middle East Europe UN Art and Gifts History Corner Topics Peace and Security Economic Development Humanitarian Aid Climate and Environment Human Rights UN Affairs Women Law and Crime Prevention Health Culture and Education SDGs Migrants and Refugees In depth Interviews Features Photo Stories News in Brief The Lid is On UN Gender Focus UN and Africa UN Podcasts Secretary-General Spokesperson All Statements Selected Speeches Press Encounters Official Travels Media UN Video UN Photo Meeting Coverage Media Accreditation Webtv   Subscribe Audio Hub Friday’s Daily Brief: Education key for Rohingya, DR Congo violence continues, Zimbabwe protest latest, women’s rights in Iran, environmental protection © UNICEF/Patrick Brown A boy reads from his textbook in a camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. (2 July 2019) 16 August 2019 Human Rights Our main stories today: Two years in, Myanmar’s Rohingya youth need more education; DR Congo testimonies highlight armed brutality; appeals for Zimbabwe to ‘stop cracking down’ on protesters; Iran urged to release women jailed for protesting veiling laws; and new human rights agreement on environmental protection. (...) UN human rights office appeals to Zimbabwe to engage with protesters and ‘stop cracking down’ Zimbabwe’s authorities should heed their people’s grievances and “stop cracking down” on protesters, the UN human rights office,  OHCHR ,  said  on Friday, as planned protests in the capital were called off at the last minute. (...) “With opposition demonstrations still likely to take place in Zimbabwe in the near future, we urge the Government to find ways to continuously engage with the population about their legitimate grievances on the economic situation, and to stop cracking down on peaceful protestors.” Mr. Colville said that there was deep concern at Zimbabwe’s continuing socio-economic crisis, which has led to soaring prices for fuel, food, transport and health services, before calling for strong social protection measures for the most vulnerable. 
Language:English
Score: 999946.8 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2019/08/1044391
Data Source: un