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OBJECTIVES OF THE DECADE Based on the Resolution, the following objectives have been defined for the Decade (each is given below in a condensed version, while the full reading is given in the footnotes): 1) Advance sustainable development5 2) Energize implementation of existing programmes and projects6 3) Mobilize action to achieve the 2030 Agenda7 2.1 Objective 1 — Advance sustainable development Water runs through all three pillars of sustainable development, with water resources impacting environment, social and economic development. (...) UN-Water conducted a mapping of UN entities and international organisations to capture the capabilities to support the implementation of the Decade and to highlight potential gaps in implementing SDG 6 and other water-related goals as defined by the 2030 Agenda. Based on this mapping exercise, the action plan for the Decade has been developed under the 4 Decade work streams, which are summarised below and available as a log frame in Annex 1. (...) The UN-Water Task Force and Decade web- site will facilitate this collaboration, by serving as a coordination platform for all relevant stakeholders as well as a wider public audience. 12 UNITED NATIONS SECRETARY- GENERAL’S ACTION PLAN 5. DEFINING SUCCESS OF THE DECADE Guiding the UN system’s supporting actions during the Decade, the following success principles will be used to accelerate and inform efforts of all stakeholders, diminish uncertain risks and define the final success of the Decade.
Language:English
Score: 202169.09 - https://sdgs.un.org/sites/defa..._Water-Action-Decade-web_0.pdf
Data Source: un
Developing new ways of defining and measuring energy access will be crucial to achieving the new Energy SDG, and ensuring energy services are financially, socially and environmentally sustainable. (...) Current binary definitions of energy access - namely, defining it as a basic household electricity connection - do not speak to the real development needs of poor people.
Language:English
Score: 354960.25 - https://sdgs.un.org/sites/defa...ors%2520Post2015%2520CAFOD.pdf
Data Source: un
Successful water governance relies on defining new or improved existing legal and institutional frameworks.
Language:English
Score: 101735.5 - https://sdgs.un.org/sites/defa...Targets-of-the-2030-Agenda.pdf
Data Source: un
According  to  the Brundtland Commission, Sustainable Development  is defined  as “development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the  ability of future generations to meet their own needs.”  
Language:English
Score: 117514.21 - https://sdgs.un.org/sites/defa...documents/1380REPORT_final.pdf
Data Source: un
Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages 3.1 By 2030, reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births 3.1.1 Maternal mortality ratio 3.1.2 Proportion of births attended by skilled health personnel 3.2 By 2030, end preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age, with all countries aiming to reduce neonatal mortality to at least as low as 12 per 1,000 live births and under-5 mortality to at least as low as 25 per 1,000 live births 3.2.1 Under-five mortality rate 3.2.2 Neonatal mortality rate Report of the Inter-Agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goal Indicators (E/CN.3/2016/2/Rev.1) 5/25 Goals and targets (from the 2030 Agenda) Indicators 3.3 By 2030, end the epidemics of AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria and neglected tropical diseases and combat hepatitis, water-borne diseases and other communicable diseases 3.3.1 Number of new HIV infections per 1,000 uninfected population, by sex, age and key populations 3.3.2 Tuberculosis incidence per 1,000 population 3.3.3 Malaria incidence per 1,000 population 3.3.4 Hepatitis B incidence per 100,000 population 3.3.5 Number of people requiring interventions against neglected tropical diseases 3.4 By 2030, reduce by one third premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being 3.4.1 Mortality rate attributed to cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes or chronic respiratory disease 3.4.2 Suicide mortality rate 3.5 Strengthen the prevention and treatment of substance abuse, including narcotic drug abuse and harmful use of alcohol 3.5.1 Coverage of treatment interventions (pharmacological, psychosocial and rehabilitation and aftercare services) for substance use disorders 3.5.2 Harmful use of alcohol, defined according to the national context as alcohol per capita consumption (aged 15 years and older) within a calendar year in litres of pure alcohol 3.6 By 2020, halve the number of global deaths and injuries from road traffic accidents 3.6.1 Death rate due to road traffic injuries 3.7 By 2030, ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health-care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programmes 3.7.1 Proportion of women of reproductive age (aged 15-49 years) who have their need for family planning satisfied with modern methods 3.7.2 Adolescent birth rate (aged 10-14 years; aged 15-19 years) per 1,000 women in that age group 3.8 Achieve universal health coverage, including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health-care services and access to safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all 3.8.1 Coverage of essential health services (defined as the average coverage of essential services based on tracer interventions that include reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health, infectious diseases, non-communicable diseases and service capacity and access, among the general and the most disadvantaged population) 3.8.2 Number of people covered by health insurance or a public health system per 1,000 population 3.9 By 2030, substantially reduce the number of deaths and illnesses from hazardous chemicals and air, water and soil pollution and contamination 3.9.1 Mortality rate attributed to household and ambient air pollution 3.9.2 Mortality rate attributed to unsafe water, unsafe sanitation and lack of hygiene (exposure to unsafe Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for All (WASH) services) Report of the Inter-Agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goal Indicators (E/CN.3/2016/2/Rev.1) 6/25 Goals and targets (from the 2030 Agenda) Indicators 3.9.3 Mortality rate attributed to unintentional poisoning 3.a Strengthen the implementation of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in all countries, as appropriate 3.a.1 Age-standardized prevalence of current tobacco use among persons aged 15 years and older 3.b Support the research and development of vaccines and medicines for the communicable and non-communicable diseases that primarily affect developing countries, provide access to affordable essential medicines and vaccines, in accordance with the Doha Declaration on the TRIPS Agreement and Public Health, which affirms the right of developing countries to use to the full the provisions in the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights regarding flexibilities to protect public health, and, in particular, provide access to medicines for all 3.b.1 Proportion of the population with access to affordable medicines and vaccines on a sustainable basis 3.b.2 Total net official development assistance to medical research and basic health sectors 3.c Substantially increase health financing and the recruitment, development, training and retention of the health workforce in developing countries, especially in least developed countries and small island developing States 3.c.1 Health worker density and distribution 3.d Strengthen the capacity of all countries, in particular developing countries, for early warning, risk reduction and management of national and global health risks 3.d.1 International Health Regulations (IHR) capacity and health emergency preparedness Goal 4.
Language:English
Score: 104929.25 - https://sdgs.un.org/sites/defa...of-Proposed-SDG-Indicators.pdf
Data Source: un
It took note that the FOC group will not duplicate the work of the IAEG-SDG and of the HLG; (j) Stressed the urgent need for investments to enhance national statistical capacity, especially in developing and least developed countries, to measure progress towards the post- 2015 development agenda at national, regional and global levels, and enable national statistical offices to play a leading and co-ordinating role in this process; (k) Requested that, in the future, in reports prepared for the consideration by the Commission due attention be given to the wording of proposed decisions to be taken by the Commission so as to ensure its independent position. 8 Annex 2 Outcome of the Expert Group Meeting on the indicator framework for the post-2015 development agenda, 25-26 February 2015, New York Consensus was reached on the following main points: • It is necessary to define an architecture for an integrated monitoring framework that would include global indicators and different levels of regional, national and thematic monitoring; • The global level monitoring framework should be limited to a small number of indicators; • Such indicators should be selected on the basis of an agreed set of criteria; • The initial proposal for indicators to be put forth by the Statistical Commission is expected to be further refined and reviewed by the Commission at its forty-seventh session, to take place in 2016; • A mechanism such as an Inter-agency and Expert Group on Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Indicators (IAEG-SDGs) should be established. • It is necessary to ensure national ownership of indicators (including of the estimation process); • It is necessary to ensure disaggregation of indicators and to include a human rights dimension to the indicator framework (following the “no one left behind” principle); • It is necessary to further strengthen national statistical capacity, including by mobilizing the necessary resources; • It is important to draw from existing integrated statistical frameworks; • It is important to build on the Millennium Development Goals’ experience and lessons learnt. 9 Annex 3 List of Countries that participated in the survey Albania Algeria Angola Armenia Australia Austria Bahamas Bahrain Bosnia Botswana Brazil Cambodia Cameroon Canada Colombia Costa Rica Croatia Denmark Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt Finland France Germany Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iraq Ireland Italy Jamaica Japan Kenya Latvia Libya Lithuania Madagascar Maldives Malta Mauritius Mexico Morocco Nepal Netherlands Niger Norway Oman Pacific Community1 Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Qatar Republic of Korea Romania Russia Singapore Slovakia Slovenia State of Palestine Sudan Suriname Sweden Switzerland Tanzania Turkey United Kingdom United States Zimbabwe 1 The Secretariat of the Pacific Community coordinated the response of all member countries and this response serves as a collective response for the following countries: Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Nauru, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu and Vanuatu. 10 Annex 4 Methodology and limitations of the initial country assessment 1. (...) Indicator 1.4.1 Proportion of population/households with access to basic services (to be defined) by sex and age group BBA * The first letter refers to the rating of feasibility, the second letter refers to the rating of suitability and the third letter to the rating of relevance (see Annex 4 for an explanation of those ratings). † This indicator was also evaluated on the feasibility of the additional proposed disaggregation beyond age and sex and was rated as “B”, feasible with strong effort. 14 Label Description Rating * Indicator 1.4.2 Proportion of adult population with tenure that is legally recognised and documented or perceived as secure, by sex and age group BBB Target 1.5 By 2030, build the resilience of the poor and those in vulnerable situations and reduce their exposure and vulnerability to climate- related extreme events and other economic, social and environmental shocks and disasters.
Language:English
Score: 134955.59 - https://sdgs.un.org/sites/defa...Bureau%2520%2528final%2529.pdf
Data Source: un
Science must lead the way - What is needed is a purpose-built ocean observing network that can observe with much greater precision and fidelity the ocean carbon, nutrient, and biomolecular fluxes that define the strength and efficiency of the ocean’s movement of carbon from the surface to depth. - Observe and report indicators of ocean heath and ecosystem vitality. - What I am describing today is a capability society MUST HAVE regardless of who does it, indeed this is in invitation for international collaboration. - An additional motivation for this is to protect the oceans: Ocean CDR is a potential multi-trillion carbon market.
Language:English
Score: 281887.92 - https://sdgs.un.org/sites/defa...6/PETER_DE_MENOCAL_%28E%29.pdf
Data Source: un
Climate change, marine biodiversity losses and pollution are three main issues that we discuss here in linking them to the goal 14 of SDGs. We have defined that one of the current gaps in dealing with marine protection and conservation is lack of ocean science and technology.
Language:English
Score: 348426.07 - https://sdgs.un.org/sites/defa...2-06/TIMOR_LESTE_%28E%29_0.pdf
Data Source: un
Partnerships are a form of cooperation that can involve multiple stakeholders and there is an expectation that all partners bring something to, and benefit from, the arrangement through mutually agreed approaches to defining partnership purpose, timeline, and goals.
Language:English
Score: 334087.94 - https://sdgs.un.org/sites/defa...22-06/BANGLADESH_%28E%29_0.pdf
Data Source: un