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Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Page Publications All publications by UNICEF in Malaysia Report 28 September 2022 Left Far Behind The Impact of COVID-19 on Access to Education and Healthcare for Refugee and Asylum-Seeking Children in Peninsular Malaysia Download file (PDF, 2,61 MB) Report 22 September 2022 Disrupting Harm Protecting children in Malaysia from online sexual exploitation & abuse Options Available options Disrupting Harm di Malaysia - Repot Penuh (BM) Disrupting Harm Executive Summary (Eng) Disrupting Harm - Ringkasan Advokasi (BM) Disrupting Harm Executive Summary (BM) Disrupting Harm in Malaysia - Launch - Key Findings Presentation Download file (PDF, 2,65 MB) (PDF, 1,06 MB) (PDF, 330,26 KB) (PDF, 522,30 KB) (PDF, 5,82 MB) Report 26 August 2022 Strengthening mental health systems & services Malaysia country report 2022 Download file (PDF, 1,15 MB) Report 27 January 2022 Managing Your Emotions & Stress Workshop Powerpoint slides Download file (PDF, 3,73 MB) Report 21 October 2021 Impact of Climate Change on Children A Malaysian Perspective Options Available options UNICEF UKM Full technical report UNICEF UKM Synthesis Report Climate change & children coffee table book 2021 Climate change 2021 report summary (Eng) Climate change 2021 report summary (BM) Climate Change Fact Sheet (Eng) Climate Change Fact Sheet BM Climate Change Fact Sheet for Children Download file (PDF, 12,88 MB) (PDF, 4,65 MB) (PDF, 21,97 MB) (PDF, 6,77 MB) (PDF, 7,61 MB) (PDF, 652,77 KB) (PDF, 652,02 KB) (PDF, 251,25 KB) Report 11 October 2021 Mapping ALCs in Malaysia Mapping alternative learning approaches, programmes and stakeholders in Malaysia Download file (PDF, 1,97 MB) Flagship report 06 October 2021 The State of the World's Children 2021 On My Mind: Promoting, protecting and caring for children’s mental health Options Available options Full Report Executive Summary Download file (PDF, 10,87 MB) (PDF, 840,92 KB) Report 14 September 2021 Inclusive Playground Best Business Practice Circular & Guidance Toolkit Options Available options Best Business Practice.
Language:English
Score: 725520.65 - https://www.unicef.org/malaysia/publications
Data Source: un
In China, the ongoing retrenchment in the real estate sector, slower-than-expected recovery of private consumption, and pandemic-induced disruptions related to the zero-tolerance COVID-19 policy, have induced a 0.8 percentage-point downgrade. (...) On the other hand,  high inflation is expected to persist for longer than envisioned,  with ongoing supply chain disruptions and high energy prices continuing throughout the year. (...) Risks In its update, the IMF warns that new variants could prolong the pandemic and induce renewed economic disruptions. A female garment factory worker in Lao PDR., by © ILO/Jean‐Pierre Pellissier On top of that,  supply chain disruptions, energy price volatility, and localized wage pressures mean there is a lot of uncertainty around inflation and policy paths. 
Language:English
Score: 724881.7 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2022/01/1110492
Data Source: un
The main regulatory reference used for ERP and the provision of Air Traffic Services (GACA regulation Parts 5 and 171) requires that an ATS provider develops and promulgates contingency arrangements and plans to be deployed in the event of disruption, or potential disruption of ATS and related supporting services in the airspace for which they are responsible for the provision of such services. (...) RESPONSIBILITY FOR DEVELOPING, PROMULGATING AND IMPLEMENTING CONTINGENCY PLANS. 2.1 In KSA, the ATS provider providing air traffic services and related supporting services in Jeddah FIR is also responsible, in the event of disruption or potential disruption of these services, for instituting measures to ensure the safety of civil aviation operations and, where possible, for making provisions for alternative facilities and services. (...) If required and after consultation with GA... c) Notification: In the event of service disruption that has not been promulgated, ATC should, if possible, broadcast to all aircraft in their airspace that the service is being disrupted, and flights must follow the contingency procedures.
Language:English
Score: 724836.5 - https://www.icao.int/MID/Documents/2021/ATM%20SG7/WP24.pdf
Data Source: un
This contingency plan contains arrangements to ensure the continued safety of air navigation in the event of partially or total disruption of air traffic services (ATS) within the South Atlantic Oceanic Flight Information Regions. (...) Introduction The need for an ATM Contingency Plan is a requirement in ICAO Annex 11 paragraph 2.30 which stipulates, “that Air traffic services authorities shall develop and promulgate contingency plans for implementation in the event of disruption, or potential disruption, of air traffic services and related supporting services in the airspace for which they are responsible for the provision of such services. (...) Discussion- 2.1 The need for an ATM Contingency Plan is a requirement in ICAO Annex 11 paragraph 2.30 which stipulates, “that Air traffic services authorities shall develop and promulgate contingency plans for implementation in the event of disruption, or potential disruption, of air traffic services and related supporting services in the airspace for which they are responsible for the provision of such services.
Language:English
Score: 724179.44 - https://www.icao.int/WACAF/Doc...0Plan%20for%20SAT%20region.pdf
Data Source: un
Disrupting harm in Ethiopia | UNICEF Ethiopia Skip to main content Ethiopia Toggle navigation Global Links Visit UNICEF Global High contrast Ethiopia EXPLORE UNICEF About us Children in Ethiopia Contact us Work with us Press centre Donate Main navigation What we do Research and reports News and stories Take action Search area has closed. (...) Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Report Disrupting harm in Ethiopia Evidence on online child sexual exploitation and abuse UNICEF Ethiopia/2022 Highlights Leveraging the unique and comprehensive evidence gathered, Disrupting Harm (DH) identifies practical and actionable solutions to protect children from sexual abuse and exploitation both online and offline. Disrupting Harm in Ethiopia is the fifth report to launch as part of Disrupting Harm, a ground-breaking, evidence-led research project on online child sexual exploitation and abuse (OCSEA). 
Language:English
Score: 724179.44 - https://www.unicef.org/ethiopi...ports/disrupting-harm-ethiopia
Data Source: un
Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Press release COVID-19 causes disruptions to child protection services in more than 100 countries, UNICEF survey finds 18 August 2020 Gonzalo Bell NEW YORK, 18 August 2020  – Violence prevention and response services have been severely disrupted during the COVID-19 pandemic, leaving children at increased risk of violence, exploitation and abuse, according to a global survey by UNICEF.  Of 136 countries that responded to UNICEF’s Socio-economic Impact Survey of COVID-19 Response, 104 countries reported a disruption in services related to violence against children. (...) More than half of the countries reported disruptions in case management, referral services and home visits by child welfare and social workers to children and women at risk of abuse.
Language:English
Score: 723833.9 - https://www.unicef.org/png/pre...ices-more-100-countries-unicef
Data Source: un
Assessment of HIV testing services and antiretroviral therapy service disruptions in the context of COVID-19: lessons learned and way forward in sub-Saharan Africa World Health Organization Global Regions World Health Organization WHO Regional websites When autocomplete results are available use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. (...) This analysis, and coordination with ministries of health, identified key service delivery adaptations utilized during COVID-19-related disruptions and formed the basis of this strategic guide. This document focuses on current country needs, as well as plans for prioritization and potential surge support needs in the event of future disruptions. Although the data and implications are specific to sub-Saharan Africa, key principles and lessons can be applied elsewhere.
Language:English
Score: 722441.55 - https://www.who.int/publicatio...-detail-redirect/9789240039599
Data Source: un
However, few studies examine the nature of interconnected risks in supply chain disruptions due to biological hazards, such as the COVID-19. This article delineates the nature of systemic risks by comparing supply chain disruptions due to biological with ones due to natural hazards. The study also analyzes if the established experiences in handling disruptions due to natural hazards can help companies manage systemic risks due to biological hazards, including the COVID-19.
Language:English
Score: 722441.55 - https://www.undrr.org/publicat...n-resilience-covid-19-pandemic
Data Source: un
The effects are even more severe if the disruption occurs in a location that contributes strategic inputs in several value chains. (...) The armed conflict in Ukraine has exacerbated the disruptions in global production networks. Both Ukraine and the Russian Federation are highly integrated in global production. (...) The conflict’s ripple effects are likely to affect all value chains the two countries participate in. Disruptions to GVCs can occur at two different levels.
Language:English
Score: 722019.34 - https://www.unido.org/stories/...e-chains-times-multiple-crises
Data Source: un
Africa) • Fastest decline in TFR recently (Lebanon, Egypt, Iran) • Iran, Lebanon and Tunisia have TFR below replacement level • Main factors: health-care related, cultural, economic, social and political Pathways to low fertility Source: Timæus & Moultrie 2020, Fig. 7 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13524-019-00848-5 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s41043-021-00239-w https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13524-019-00848-5 Pulse survey on continuity of essential health services during COVID-19 pandemic • Objective: To better understand the extent of disruptions to essential health services caused by the COVID-19 pandemic • Second wave: Jan-Mar 2021 • Coverage: Global (135 countries and territories) • Reporting period: 3 months preceding date of survey submission 20% 8% 16% 13% 21% 8% 14% 0% 8% 8% 8% 9% 13% 8% 3% 8% 1% 5% 2% 25% 7% 24% 24% 26% 26% 32% 46% 30% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%100% Immunization (n=19) Mental, neurological and substance use disorders (n=16) Communicable diseases (n=17) Noncommunicable diseases (n=17) Reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health and nutrition (n=18) Neglected tropical diseases (n=12) AVERAGE DISRUPTION OF PROGRAMME SPECIFIC AREAS Percentage of countries Es se nt ia l h ea lth se rv ic e Percentage of countries reporting disruptions across tracer service areas 5-25% disrupted 26-50% disrupted More than 50% disrupted >1/4 >40% Most frequently disrupted services are for NTDs (46%) and RMNCAH (32%) Other essential health services are disrupted in approximately 1/4 of countries Disruptions were reported across major service areas with Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) showing the highest level of disruption Disruptions in services for RMNCAH and nutrition • Nearly 40% of countries have reported disruptions to family planning and contraception, antenatal care (39%), sick child services (39%) and management of moderate and severe malnutrition services (39%) 18% 13% 6% 33% 22% 22% 33% 24% 21% 0% 13% 13% 0% 11% 17% 6% 12% 9% 0% 0% 6% 0% 6% 0% 0% 6% 2% 18% 25% 25% 33% 39% 39% 39% 41% 32% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Safe abortion and post-abortion care (n=11) Facility-based births (n = 16) Postnatal care for women and newborns (n=16) Intimate partner and sexual violence prevention and response (n=9) Sick child services (n=18) Antenatal care (n=18) Management of moderate and severe malnutrition (n=18) Family planning and contraception (n=17) AVERAGE DISRUPTION IN SERVICE GROUP Percentage of countries Es se nt ia l h ea lth se rv ic e Percentage of countries reporting disruptions in RMNCAH and nutrition services 5% to 25% disrupted 26% to 50% disrupted More than 50% disrupted Reproductive health and the COVID-19 pandemic • Socio-economic impact influence reproductive health services for women • Negative consequences for women access to family planning • Women are vulnerable during the COVID-19 pandemic (forced/early marriages) • Limited access to reproductive health services • Systematic review studies on impact of COVID-19 on fertility • Male Fertility and the COVID-19 Pandemic: Systematic Review of the Literature • COVID-19 may affect male fertility but is not sexually transmitted: a systematic review • A review of initial data on pregnancy during the COVID-19 outbreak: implications for assisted reproductive treatments • Impact of COVID-19 on female fertility: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol • Potential impacts of COVID-19 on reproductive health: Scientific findings and social dimension https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7502312/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7857030/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7169922/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7908052/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7831751/ Average % of countries reporting disruptions dropped across all tracer service areas • Countries participating in either survey round 38% 9% 68% 34% 50% 20% 61% 34% 40% 20% 38% 17% 31% 39% 12% 0% 9% 2% 17% 3% 10% 2% 4% 4% 30% 8% 17% 9% 50% 9% 77% 37% 67% 24% 71% 36% 44% 23% 69% 25% 47% 47% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Round 1 (n=13) Round 2 (n=17) Round 1 (n=13) Round 2 (n=19) Round 1 (n=13) Round 2 (n=19) Round 1 (n=13) Round 2 (n=17) Round 1 (n=19) Round 2 (n=19) Round 1 (n=19) Round 2 (n=20) Round 1 (n=19) Round 2 (n=19) Emergency, critical and operative care RMNCAH and nutrition Immunization Communicable diseases Noncommunicable diseases Mental, neurological and substance use disorders Rehabilitative and palliative care Pe rc en ta ge o f c ou nt rie s Round 1 vs. Round 2 comparison: Service disruptions by tracer service area 5-50% disrupted More than 50% disrupted Note: represents global findings from all countries that participated in either round 1 or 2 of survey. (...) Global J Health Sc. 2013; 5(4): 106-113. http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/gjhs.v5n4p106 • WHO Libya Annual Report 2020. https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/en/operations/libya/document/who-libya-annual-report-2020 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13524-019-00848-5 https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/WHO-2019-nCoV-EHS-continuity-survey-2021.1 https://doi.org/10.26719/emhj.18.023 http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/gjhs.v5n4p106 https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/en/operations/libya/document/who-libya-annual-report-2020 Impact of COVID-19 and civil unrest on fertility-related behavior and service delivery in the Middle East and North Africa Slide Number 2 Slide Number 3 Slide Number 4 Slide Number 5 Slide Number 6 Reproductive health and the COVID-19 pandemic Average % of countries reporting disruptions dropped across all tracer service areas Country disruptions to tracer services: RMNCAH, nutrition and immunization (1/2) Country disruptions to tracer services: RMNCAH, nutrition and immunization (2/2) RMNCH interventions coverage disruption Recommended strategies to restore or adapt service delivery being implemented by many countries Disasters and their impact on reproductive health behavior Conclusion References
Language:English
Score: 650322.1 - https://www.un.org/development...egm_session_v_henry_doctor.pdf
Data Source: un