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It’s vital that countries find innovative ways to ensure that essential services for NCDs continue, even as they fight COVID-19.” Service disruptions are widespread The main finding is that health services have been partially or completely disrupted in many countries. (...) Unsurprisingly, there appears to be a correlation between levels of disruption to services for treating NCDs and the evolution of the COVID-19 outbreak in a country.  Services become increasingly disrupted as a country moves from sporadic cases to community transmission of the coronavirus.
Language:English
Score: 733401.6 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...s-for-noncommunicable-diseases
Data Source: un
The World Bank’s recent study on the impact of the Ukraine war on global trade and investment revealed that the conflict has become the main cause of the disruptions in commodity markets, logistic networks and supply chains, among other issues. (...) As highlighted in the UN Global Survey on Digital and Sustainable Trade Facilitation , COVID-19-related international supply chain disruptions and the recent surge in shipping costs have put additional pressure on importers and exporters, thus reinforcing the importance of trade facilitation, particularly in developing and emerging countries.   (...) In the times of public health crises, conflicts, and related supply chain disruptions, UN/CEFACT standards and recommendations are more relevant than ever and several of them have been developed to support relevant policy actions.
Language:English
Score: 733401.6 - https://unece.org/media/Sustainable-Development/news/369667
Data Source: un
The World Bank’s recent study on the impact of the Ukraine war on global trade and investment revealed that the conflict has become the main cause of the disruptions in commodity markets, logistic networks and supply chains, among other issues. (...) As highlighted in the UN Global Survey on Digital and Sustainable Trade Facilitation , COVID-19-related international supply chain disruptions and the recent surge in shipping costs have put additional pressure on importers and exporters, thus reinforcing the importance of trade facilitation, particularly in developing and emerging countries.   (...) In the times of public health crises, conflicts, and related supply chain disruptions, UN/CEFACT standards and recommendations are more relevant than ever and several of them have been developed to support relevant policy actions.
Language:English
Score: 733401.6 - https://unece.org/media/news/369667
Data Source: un
Restrictions introduced in response to the pandemic have caused disruptions affecting ports, shipping and supply chains. (...) They also varied by region, level of development, and the state of prior preparedness to shocks and disruptions. UNCTAD’s assessment helps to shed some light on the COVID-19 impacts on key areas of the global and regional maritime transportation systems and ways in which governments and industry have coped with the disruption. (...) Mario Castillo, Chief, Trade and Integration Division, UN-ECLAC 15h15-16:05: COVID-19 and Maritime Transport: Disruptions and Resilience in LAC Mr. Athanasios A.
Language:English
Score: 733401.6 - https://www.cepal.org/en/event...s-and-resilience-latin-america
Data Source: un
Mass drug distribution to help end Lymphatic Filariasis (LF). © Credits Neglected tropical diseases: 2020 preventive chemotherapy treatment coverage declines due to COVID-19 disruptions 24 September 2021 Departmental news Geneva Reading time: Data compiled by the World Health Organization (WHO) indicate the severity of disruptions caused to the delivery of health services for neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), with fewer people treated during large-scale treatment campaigns, as compared with more than one billion annually since 2015. (...) Data reporting and disruptions So far, 62 countries reported on implementation of large-scale treatment programmes (preventive chemotherapy or mass drug administration) for at least one of the five target diseases. (...) The health consequences of the disruptions can increase the burden of NTDs, delay the achievement of public health goals set for some NTDs as well as impact the collection, analysis and sharing of epidemiological data for planning purposes.
Language:English
Score: 733401.6 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...es-due-to-covid-19-disruptions
Data Source: un
The occurrence of mandated disruptions of communications a) Information on the occurrence of any government-mandated disruptions of access to mobile or telephone communications networks over the past 5 years. Including their duration, geographical scope, whether or not there were official orders for these interventions and whether there were any legal measures taken to reverse the disruptions or to hold accountable those responsible. b) Information on the occurrence of mandated disruptions of access to social media and messaging platforms over the past 5 years,. including their duration, geographical scope, whether or not there were official orders for these interventions and whether there were any legal measures taken to reverse the disruptions or to hold accountable those responsible. 2. Research conducted on the impact of mandated communications disruptions Data or research on the impact of communication disruptions on economic, social, cultural and political activities.
Language:English
Score: 733401.6 - https://www.ohchr.org/en/calls...-human-rights-fiftieth-session
Data Source: un
According to new data by WHO and UNICEF , these disruptions threaten to reverse hard-won progress to reach more children and adolescents with a wider range of vaccines, which has already been hampered by a decade of stalling coverage. (...) Respondents from 82 countries, including 14 with lower than 80 per cent vaccination coverage rates in 2019, reported on disruptions in immunization services due to COVID-19 as of May 2020.  (...) A previous pulse poll, conducted in April received 801 responses from 107 countries, showed that disruption to the routine immunization programs were already widespread and affected all regions. 64 per cent of countries represented in that poll indicated that routine immunizations had been disrupted or even suspended.
Language:English
Score: 733373.5 - https://www.unicef.org/afghani...e-vaccinations-during-covid-19
Data Source: un
Without urgent investments to re-start disrupted health systems and services, millions of children under five, especially newborns, could die.” (...) In addition, 63 per cent of countries reported disruptions in antenatal checkups and 59 per cent in post-natal care. (...) For the UNICEF survey on disruptions due to COVID-19, click here . These links will go live after 00.01 GMT 9 September.
Language:English
Score: 733350.05 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...ble-child-deaths-agencies-warn
Data Source: un
According to new data by WHO and UNICEF , these disruptions threaten to reverse hard-won progress to reach more children and adolescents with a wider range of vaccines, which has already been hampered by a decade of stalling coverage. (...) Respondents from 82 countries, including 14 with lower than 80 per cent vaccination coverage rates in 2019, reported on disruptions in immunization services due to COVID-19 as of May 2020.  (...) A previous pulse poll, conducted in April received 801 responses from 107 countries, showed that disruption to the routine immunization programs were already widespread and affected all regions. 64 per cent of countries represented in that poll indicated that routine immunizations had been disrupted or even suspended.
Language:English
Score: 733350.05 - https://www.unicef.org/maldive...e-vaccinations-during-covid-19
Data Source: un
Africa) • Fastest decline in TFR recently (Lebanon, Egypt, Iran) • Iran, Lebanon and Tunisia have TFR below replacement level • Main factors: health-care related, cultural, economic, social and political Pathways to low fertility Source: Timæus & Moultrie 2020, Fig. 7 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13524-019-00848-5 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s41043-021-00239-w https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13524-019-00848-5 Pulse survey on continuity of essential health services during COVID-19 pandemic • Objective: To better understand the extent of disruptions to essential health services caused by the COVID-19 pandemic • Second wave: Jan-Mar 2021 • Coverage: Global (135 countries and territories) • Reporting period: 3 months preceding date of survey submission 20% 8% 16% 13% 21% 8% 14% 0% 8% 8% 8% 9% 13% 8% 3% 8% 1% 5% 2% 25% 7% 24% 24% 26% 26% 32% 46% 30% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%100% Immunization (n=19) Mental, neurological and substance use disorders (n=16) Communicable diseases (n=17) Noncommunicable diseases (n=17) Reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health and nutrition (n=18) Neglected tropical diseases (n=12) AVERAGE DISRUPTION OF PROGRAMME SPECIFIC AREAS Percentage of countries Es se nt ia l h ea lth se rv ic e Percentage of countries reporting disruptions across tracer service areas 5-25% disrupted 26-50% disrupted More than 50% disrupted >1/4 >40% Most frequently disrupted services are for NTDs (46%) and RMNCAH (32%) Other essential health services are disrupted in approximately 1/4 of countries Disruptions were reported across major service areas with Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) showing the highest level of disruption Disruptions in services for RMNCAH and nutrition • Nearly 40% of countries have reported disruptions to family planning and contraception, antenatal care (39%), sick child services (39%) and management of moderate and severe malnutrition services (39%) 18% 13% 6% 33% 22% 22% 33% 24% 21% 0% 13% 13% 0% 11% 17% 6% 12% 9% 0% 0% 6% 0% 6% 0% 0% 6% 2% 18% 25% 25% 33% 39% 39% 39% 41% 32% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Safe abortion and post-abortion care (n=11) Facility-based births (n = 16) Postnatal care for women and newborns (n=16) Intimate partner and sexual violence prevention and response (n=9) Sick child services (n=18) Antenatal care (n=18) Management of moderate and severe malnutrition (n=18) Family planning and contraception (n=17) AVERAGE DISRUPTION IN SERVICE GROUP Percentage of countries Es se nt ia l h ea lth se rv ic e Percentage of countries reporting disruptions in RMNCAH and nutrition services 5% to 25% disrupted 26% to 50% disrupted More than 50% disrupted Reproductive health and the COVID-19 pandemic • Socio-economic impact influence reproductive health services for women • Negative consequences for women access to family planning • Women are vulnerable during the COVID-19 pandemic (forced/early marriages) • Limited access to reproductive health services • Systematic review studies on impact of COVID-19 on fertility • Male Fertility and the COVID-19 Pandemic: Systematic Review of the Literature • COVID-19 may affect male fertility but is not sexually transmitted: a systematic review • A review of initial data on pregnancy during the COVID-19 outbreak: implications for assisted reproductive treatments • Impact of COVID-19 on female fertility: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol • Potential impacts of COVID-19 on reproductive health: Scientific findings and social dimension https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7502312/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7857030/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7169922/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7908052/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7831751/ Average % of countries reporting disruptions dropped across all tracer service areas • Countries participating in either survey round 38% 9% 68% 34% 50% 20% 61% 34% 40% 20% 38% 17% 31% 39% 12% 0% 9% 2% 17% 3% 10% 2% 4% 4% 30% 8% 17% 9% 50% 9% 77% 37% 67% 24% 71% 36% 44% 23% 69% 25% 47% 47% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Round 1 (n=13) Round 2 (n=17) Round 1 (n=13) Round 2 (n=19) Round 1 (n=13) Round 2 (n=19) Round 1 (n=13) Round 2 (n=17) Round 1 (n=19) Round 2 (n=19) Round 1 (n=19) Round 2 (n=20) Round 1 (n=19) Round 2 (n=19) Emergency, critical and operative care RMNCAH and nutrition Immunization Communicable diseases Noncommunicable diseases Mental, neurological and substance use disorders Rehabilitative and palliative care Pe rc en ta ge o f c ou nt rie s Round 1 vs. Round 2 comparison: Service disruptions by tracer service area 5-50% disrupted More than 50% disrupted Note: represents global findings from all countries that participated in either round 1 or 2 of survey. (...) Global J Health Sc. 2013; 5(4): 106-113. http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/gjhs.v5n4p106 • WHO Libya Annual Report 2020. https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/en/operations/libya/document/who-libya-annual-report-2020 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13524-019-00848-5 https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/WHO-2019-nCoV-EHS-continuity-survey-2021.1 https://doi.org/10.26719/emhj.18.023 http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/gjhs.v5n4p106 https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/en/operations/libya/document/who-libya-annual-report-2020 Impact of COVID-19 and civil unrest on fertility-related behavior and service delivery in the Middle East and North Africa Slide Number 2 Slide Number 3 Slide Number 4 Slide Number 5 Slide Number 6 Reproductive health and the COVID-19 pandemic Average % of countries reporting disruptions dropped across all tracer service areas Country disruptions to tracer services: RMNCAH, nutrition and immunization (1/2) Country disruptions to tracer services: RMNCAH, nutrition and immunization (2/2) RMNCH interventions coverage disruption Recommended strategies to restore or adapt service delivery being implemented by many countries Disasters and their impact on reproductive health behavior Conclusion References
Language:English
Score: 661029.54 - https://www.un.org/development...egm_session_v_henry_doctor.pdf
Data Source: un