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INTRODUCTION 1.1 The study concluded by the Task Force on legal aspects of Unruly/disrupted passenger (UPAXTF), during its last meeting in Geneva (Swiss Confederation) between 19 – 21 February 2018, emphasized the importance also the complexity of the revision of Circular 288 LE/1 “Guidance Material on the Legal Aspects of Unruly/Disruptive Passengers”. 1.2 The outcome of the study is reflected in a Draft of Manual LC/37-WP/2-3 Appendix. (...) TERMINOLOGY 3.1 If the common use of the term “unruly and disruptive passenger” could be accepted, it is convenient to take into account that, in the legal field, the appropriate use of the terminology, is essential to capture the objective of the regulations. (...) ALIGNMENT WITH ANNEXES 4.1 ALADA considers convenient that the definition of unruly and disruptive passenger not only will be aligned with Annex 17 Security, and the Security Manual (Document 8973), but also with Annex 9 FAL, due to the close and specially link there. 5.
Language:English
Score: 641175.3 - https://www.icao.int/Meetings/...7%20WP2-9%20EN%20-%20ALADA.PDF
Data Source: un
Unprecedented disruption requires us, as a global community, to be disruptive in how we act, says head of education at UNESCO Skip to main content Toggle navigation Building peace in the minds of men and women Member states Staff Search form Search Search English English Français Español Main shared menu In brief Introducing UNESCO Mission and Mandate UNESCO House Strategic Transformation Portal Who's Who? Director-General Governance Transparency Internal Oversight Service Key Figures & Budget Funding needs & data What we do Expertise Education Culture Natural Sciences Social and Human Sciences Communication & Information Major Initiatives Revive the Spirit of Mosul Futures of Education Fostering freedom of expression Building knowledge societies Sustainable Cities Preventing violent extremism Our commitment to biodiversity Advancing the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda Specialized Areas Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission Global Education Monitoring Report Global Priorities Africa Gender Equality Where we work Member States Field Offices National Commissions Ocean & Climate Platform Networks International Coalition of Inclusive and Sustainable Cities – ICCAR UNESCO Associated Schools Network Education for Sustainable Development Network UNITWIN – UNESCO Chairs UNEVOC - International Centre for Technical and Vocational Education and Training Institutes UIS - UNESCO Institute for Statistics IIEP - International Institute for Educational Planning ICTP - International Centre for Theoretical Physics UIL - Institute for Lifelong Learning IBE - International Bureau of Education IICBA - International Institute for Capacity-Building in Africa IITE - Institute for Information Technologies in Education IESALC - International Institute for Higher Education in Latin America and the Caribbean MGIEP - Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Education for Peace and Sustainable Development Partners Introducing Partnerships Public partners Business, cities, young people UNESCO family partners and networks NGO's and Foundations Goodwill Ambassadors Join us Careers Procurement Fellowships Internship Resources For Journalists: Press room For Delegates: UNESCO.int Documents & Publications - UNESDOC Online Bookshop The UNESCO Courier Conventions Official Photos UNESCO Lists World Heritage Intangible Cultural Heritage Creative Cities Memory of the World Register Biosphere Reserves UNESCO Global Geoparks UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger Data and Statistics UNESCO Institute for Statistics Observatory of Killed Journalists World Inequality Database on Education Transparency portal Archives UNESCO Archives Digital Archives Library UNESCO Library UNESDOC Digital Library Multimedia collections News Unprecedented disruption requires us, as a global community, to be disruptive in how we act, says head of education at UNESCO 23/09/2020 × Share this article An extraordinary session of the Global Education Meeting (2020 GEM) is convened on 20 and 22 October to protect and promote education at a time when education financing is at considerable risk of being left behind in the governments’ domestic budgets, stimulus packages and international aid. (...) Five themes have been identified as critical and central to the education response in the COVID-19 context and beyond: Protect domestic and international financing of education Reopen schools safely Focus on inclusion, equity and gender equality Reimagine teaching and learning Harness equitable connectivity and technologies for learning “Behind the 2020 GEM is the resolve to speak with one voice, against the backdrop of unprecedented disruption that requires us, as a global community, to be disruptive in how we act.
Language:English
Score: 641175.3 - https://en.unesco.org/news/unp...isruptive-how-we-act-says-head
Data Source: un
“Medical goods are in short supply and supply chains are under historic strain due to transport disruptions. Flight cancellations and trade restrictions by countries have severely constrained access to essential medicines, including vaccines. “As the pandemic progresses, critical life-saving services, including immunization, will likely be disrupted, especially in Africa, Asia and the Middle East where they are sorely needed. (...) We are in close communication with global vaccine suppliers to ensure production is not disrupted and supply is managed in the best possible manner under these difficult circumstances.
Language:English
Score: 641175.3 - https://www.unicef.org/turkey/...ruption-immunization-and-basic
Data Source: un
With lockdowns in place as a part of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) response, routine immunizations have been severely disrupted, and parents are increasingly reluctant to take their children to health centers for routine jabs. (...) “Vaccine stocks are running dangerously low in some countries of the region as supply chains have been disrupted with travel bans and cancelled flights. The manufacturing of the vaccines has also been disrupted, creating additional shortages,” says Paul Rutter, Regional Health Advisor for UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia (ROSA). (...) While the COVID-19 virus does not appear to make many children seriously ill, the health of hundreds of thousands of children could be impacted by this disruption of regular immunization services. This is a very serious threat.
Language:English
Score: 641175.3 - https://www.unicef.org/rosa/pr...threat-childrens-health-unicef
Data Source: un
With lockdowns in place as a part of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) response, routine immunizations have been severely disrupted, and parents are increasingly reluctant to take their children to health centers for routine jabs. (...) “Vaccine stocks are running dangerously low in some countries of the region as supply chains have been disrupted with travel bans and cancelled flights. The manufacturing of the vaccines has also been disrupted, creating additional shortages,” says Paul Rutter, Regional Health Advisor for UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia (ROSA). (...) While the COVID-19 virus does not appear to make many children seriously ill, the health of hundreds of thousands of children could be impacted by this disruption of regular immunization services. This is a very serious threat.
Language:English
Score: 641175.3 - https://www.unicef.org/afghani...threat-childrens-health-unicef
Data Source: un
With lockdowns in place as a part of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) response, routine immunizations have been severely disrupted, and parents are increasingly reluctant to take their children to health centers for routine jabs. (...) “Vaccine stocks are running dangerously low in some countries of the region as supply chains have been disrupted with travel bans and cancelled flights. The manufacturing of the vaccines has also been disrupted, creating additional shortages,” says Paul Rutter, Regional Health Advisor for UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia (ROSA). (...) While the COVID-19 virus does not appear to make many children seriously ill, the health of hundreds of thousands of children could be impacted by this disruption of regular immunization services. This is a very serious threat.
Language:English
Score: 641175.3 - https://www.unicef.org/maldive...threat-childrens-health-unicef
Data Source: un
According to new data by WHO and UNICEF , these disruptions threaten to   reverse hard-won progress to reach more children and adolescents with a wider range of vaccines, which has already been hampered by a decade of stalling coverage. (...) The reasons for disrupted services vary. Even when services are offered, people are either unable to access them because of reluctance to leave home, transport interruptions, economic hardships, restrictions on movement, or fear of being exposed to people with COVID-19. (...) However, that hard-won progress could be undone by COVID-19 related disruptions. Countries that had recorded significant progress, such as Ethiopia and Pakistan, are now also at risk of backsliding if immunization services are not restored as soon as feasible.
Language:English
Score: 641019 - https://www.unicef.org/ukraine...e-vaccinations-during-covid-19
Data Source: un
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The project addresses a series of challenges facing policy makers and innovation agencies dealing with disruptive innovation and offering direct support across the ECE region. (...) A central element of the project is developing the structure and content for a portal on disruptive innovation, with a user- friendly interface that will enable innovation agencies and innovators to analyse historical disruptive innovations and, based on that, identify trends and emerging innovation ecosystems. (...) Strengthen capacities among UNECE member States to enable and promote, including through direct financing mechanisms, disruptive innovation for sustainable development and the circular economy transition.
Language:English
Score: 639776.76 - https://unece.org/sites/defaul...20for%20sust%20development.pdf
Data Source: un
For every child, health1 THE POTENTIAL IMPACT OF HEALTH CARE DISRUPTION ON CHILD MORTALITY IN THE MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA DUE TO COVID-19 J U N E 2 0 2 0 © UNICEF/UNI219052/Rfaat A B S T R A C T This technical brief summarizes the results for the MENA/EMRO region, of a global study by the John Hopkins University on the potential impact on child mortality and nutrition of health care disruptions due to the COVID-19 crisis. (...) The other top contributing factors are related to the disruption of essential care at birth and immunization. (...) FIGURE 2: % of additional child deaths attributable to the disruption of specific health care interventions and the increase in wasting.
Language:English
Score: 639495.85 - https://www.unicef.org/mena/me...6/file/health_brief-EN.pdf.pdf
Data Source: un
Africa) • Fastest decline in TFR recently (Lebanon, Egypt, Iran) • Iran, Lebanon and Tunisia have TFR below replacement level • Main factors: health-care related, cultural, economic, social and political Pathways to low fertility Source: Timæus & Moultrie 2020, Fig. 7 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13524-019-00848-5 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s41043-021-00239-w https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13524-019-00848-5 Pulse survey on continuity of essential health services during COVID-19 pandemic • Objective: To better understand the extent of disruptions to essential health services caused by the COVID-19 pandemic • Second wave: Jan-Mar 2021 • Coverage: Global (135 countries and territories) • Reporting period: 3 months preceding date of survey submission 20% 8% 16% 13% 21% 8% 14% 0% 8% 8% 8% 9% 13% 8% 3% 8% 1% 5% 2% 25% 7% 24% 24% 26% 26% 32% 46% 30% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90%100% Immunization (n=19) Mental, neurological and substance use disorders (n=16) Communicable diseases (n=17) Noncommunicable diseases (n=17) Reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health and nutrition (n=18) Neglected tropical diseases (n=12) AVERAGE DISRUPTION OF PROGRAMME SPECIFIC AREAS Percentage of countries Es se nt ia l h ea lth se rv ic e Percentage of countries reporting disruptions across tracer service areas 5-25% disrupted 26-50% disrupted More than 50% disrupted >1/4 >40% Most frequently disrupted services are for NTDs (46%) and RMNCAH (32%) Other essential health services are disrupted in approximately 1/4 of countries Disruptions were reported across major service areas with Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) showing the highest level of disruption Disruptions in services for RMNCAH and nutrition • Nearly 40% of countries have reported disruptions to family planning and contraception, antenatal care (39%), sick child services (39%) and management of moderate and severe malnutrition services (39%) 18% 13% 6% 33% 22% 22% 33% 24% 21% 0% 13% 13% 0% 11% 17% 6% 12% 9% 0% 0% 6% 0% 6% 0% 0% 6% 2% 18% 25% 25% 33% 39% 39% 39% 41% 32% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Safe abortion and post-abortion care (n=11) Facility-based births (n = 16) Postnatal care for women and newborns (n=16) Intimate partner and sexual violence prevention and response (n=9) Sick child services (n=18) Antenatal care (n=18) Management of moderate and severe malnutrition (n=18) Family planning and contraception (n=17) AVERAGE DISRUPTION IN SERVICE GROUP Percentage of countries Es se nt ia l h ea lth se rv ic e Percentage of countries reporting disruptions in RMNCAH and nutrition services 5% to 25% disrupted 26% to 50% disrupted More than 50% disrupted Reproductive health and the COVID-19 pandemic • Socio-economic impact influence reproductive health services for women • Negative consequences for women access to family planning • Women are vulnerable during the COVID-19 pandemic (forced/early marriages) • Limited access to reproductive health services • Systematic review studies on impact of COVID-19 on fertility • Male Fertility and the COVID-19 Pandemic: Systematic Review of the Literature • COVID-19 may affect male fertility but is not sexually transmitted: a systematic review • A review of initial data on pregnancy during the COVID-19 outbreak: implications for assisted reproductive treatments • Impact of COVID-19 on female fertility: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol • Potential impacts of COVID-19 on reproductive health: Scientific findings and social dimension https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7502312/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7857030/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7169922/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7908052/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7831751/ Average % of countries reporting disruptions dropped across all tracer service areas • Countries participating in either survey round 38% 9% 68% 34% 50% 20% 61% 34% 40% 20% 38% 17% 31% 39% 12% 0% 9% 2% 17% 3% 10% 2% 4% 4% 30% 8% 17% 9% 50% 9% 77% 37% 67% 24% 71% 36% 44% 23% 69% 25% 47% 47% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Round 1 (n=13) Round 2 (n=17) Round 1 (n=13) Round 2 (n=19) Round 1 (n=13) Round 2 (n=19) Round 1 (n=13) Round 2 (n=17) Round 1 (n=19) Round 2 (n=19) Round 1 (n=19) Round 2 (n=20) Round 1 (n=19) Round 2 (n=19) Emergency, critical and operative care RMNCAH and nutrition Immunization Communicable diseases Noncommunicable diseases Mental, neurological and substance use disorders Rehabilitative and palliative care Pe rc en ta ge o f c ou nt rie s Round 1 vs. Round 2 comparison: Service disruptions by tracer service area 5-50% disrupted More than 50% disrupted Note: represents global findings from all countries that participated in either round 1 or 2 of survey. (...) Global J Health Sc. 2013; 5(4): 106-113. http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/gjhs.v5n4p106 • WHO Libya Annual Report 2020. https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/en/operations/libya/document/who-libya-annual-report-2020 https://doi.org/10.1007/s13524-019-00848-5 https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/WHO-2019-nCoV-EHS-continuity-survey-2021.1 https://doi.org/10.26719/emhj.18.023 http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/gjhs.v5n4p106 https://www.humanitarianresponse.info/en/operations/libya/document/who-libya-annual-report-2020 Impact of COVID-19 and civil unrest on fertility-related behavior and service delivery in the Middle East and North Africa Slide Number 2 Slide Number 3 Slide Number 4 Slide Number 5 Slide Number 6 Reproductive health and the COVID-19 pandemic Average % of countries reporting disruptions dropped across all tracer service areas Country disruptions to tracer services: RMNCAH, nutrition and immunization (1/2) Country disruptions to tracer services: RMNCAH, nutrition and immunization (2/2) RMNCH interventions coverage disruption Recommended strategies to restore or adapt service delivery being implemented by many countries Disasters and their impact on reproductive health behavior Conclusion References
Language:English
Score: 627001.1 - https://www.un.org/development...egm_session_v_henry_doctor.pdf
Data Source: un