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NOTE VERBALE DATED 8 JUNE 2020 FROM THE PERMANENT MISSION OF ERITREA TO THE UNITED NATIONS OFFICE AT GENEVA ADDRESSED TO THE OFFICE OF THE UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS
The report claims that the national service remains one of the main drivers of migration from Eritrea”. This is another wholesale resuscitation, without independent validation, of a worn-out and distorted narrative by Eritrea’s detractors.
语言:中文
得分: 818794.6 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...et?open&DS=A/HRC/44/G/4&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
LETTER DATED 27 APRIL 2021 FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL AND THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVES OF THE MEMBERS OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL
.: General 27 April 2021 Resolution 2573 (2021) Adopted by the Security Council on 27 April 2021 The Security Council, Reiterating its primary responsibility under the Charter of the United Nations for the maintenance of international peace and security and, in this context, the need to promote and ensure respect for international humanitarian law, Recalling all relevant Security Council resolutions, including resolutions 1265 (1999), 1894 (2009), 1998 (2011), 2175 (2014), 2286 (2016), 2417 (2018), and its Presidential Statements of 12 February 1999 (S/PRST/1999/6), 12 February 2013 (S/PRST/2013/2), 9 August 2017 (S/PRST/2017/14), 20 August 2019 (S/PRST/2019/8), and 29 April 2020 (S/PRST/2020/6), Reaffirming the full respect for the sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of all States in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, Reiterating the primary responsibility of States to protect the population throughout their territories, Gravely concerned about the level of violence against civilians in situations of armed conflicts, including indiscriminate attacks and establishment of military positions in densely populated areas, and their devastating impacts upon civilians, Emphasising with deep concern that ongoing armed conflicts have devastating impacts on civilians and civilian objects, including civilians engaged in duties related to the operation, maintenance or repair of civilian infrastructure that is critical to the delivery of essential services to the civilian population and their assets that are civilian as such, and on objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population, exacerbate existing socio-economic fragilities and vulnerabilities, overstretch limited resources, resulting in reduced access to essential services such as health care, water, sanitation, energy, posing devastating consequences for the civilian population, and hindering an effective humanitarian response, Recognizing the interconnectedness of certain essential services, as well as the vulnerabilities of objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population that can be damaged in situations of armed conflict, S/2021/407 21-05591 4/6 Reiterating the call on all parties to armed conflict to comply with their obligations under international humanitarian law including regarding respecting and protecting civilians and taking constant care to spare civilian objects, including such objects critical to the delivery of essential services to the civilian population, refraining from attacking, destroying, removing or rendering useless objects that are indispensable to the survival of the civilian population and respecting and protecting humanitarian personnel and consignments used for humanitarian relief operations, Further expressing concern about the misuse of objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population in contravention of applicable international law, that may endanger civilians and their ability to access essential services in situations of armed conflict, Recalling its deep concern at the military use of schools in contravention of applicable international law, recognising that such use may render schools legitimate targets of attack, thus endangering children’s and teachers’ safety as well as children’s education, Noting with concern the threats posed to civilian infrastructure, including that which supports essential services to the civilian population, by the use of any means or methods of warfare in violation of international humanitarian law, and the potentially devastating humanitarian impact of such use in situations of armed conflict, Noting that armed conflicts, violations of international humanitarian law and international human rights law, and destruction of or other damage to objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population can reduce or deprive civilians of access to essential services in situations of armed conflicts, and can be drivers of or aggravate forced displacement, compound the spread of infectious diseases in these contexts and hamper an effective public health response, Reiterating its commitment to pursue all possible avenues to prevent and end armed conflicts, including through addressing their underlying root causes in an inclusive, integrated and sustainable manner, Reiterating the need to strengthen efforts to resolve armed conflict and build sustainable peace and convinced that the protection of civilians in armed conflict and the protection of objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population should be an important aspect in this regard, Reiterating deep concern at the increasing number of civilians in ongoing armed conflict and related violence facing the threat of conflict -induced food insecurity and the threat of famine, Noting that the humanitarian situation in many armed conflicts can also be compounded by economic crises, increasingly frequent and severe weather events, and natural disasters and has deteriorated as a result of the impacts of the COVID -19 pandemic and, in this regard, reaffirming the need for combatting and sustainably recovering from the pandemic, Recalling the obligations of all parties to armed conflicts under international law, including international human rights law, as applicable, and international humanitarian law including the prohibition of attacks directed against civilians and civilian objects, medical personnel and humanitarian personnel exclusively engaged in medical duties, their means of transport and equipment, hospitals, and other medical facilities, Underlining the obligations of all parties to armed conflicts under international humanitarian law related to protecting civilians and civilian objects, meeting the basic S/2021/407 5/6 21-05591 needs of the civilian population within their territory or under their control, and allowing and facilitating the rapid and unimpeded passage of impartial humanitarian relief to all those in need, Stressing the particular impact that armed conflict has on women, children, including as refugees and internally displaced persons, and other civilians who may have specific vulnerabilities including persons with disabilities and older persons, including through increased risk of violence and lack of access to essential services, and stressing the protection and assistance needs of all affected civilian populations, Recalling its practice that mandates of UN peacekeeping and other relevant missions include, where appropriate and on a case-by-case basis, provisions regarding the protection of civilians, Stressing the need to fight against impunity and the importance of ensuring accountability for serious violations of international law, including international humanitarian law and international human rights law, Recognising the need to return as quickly as possible and in an inclusive and equitable manner provision of essential services, while building back better and providing more resilient essential services to the civilian population, in contributing to advancing the comprehensive approach to sustaining peace in countries in situations of armed conflict and post-conflict, and in this regard, welcoming relevant international and regional cooperation, 1.
语言:中文
得分: 818794.6 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc.../get?open&DS=S/2021/407&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON EXTRAJUDICIAL, SUMMARY OR ARBITRARY EXECUTIONS, PHILIP ALSTON : ADDENDUM
For example, in March 2007, some 600 matatu owners and drivers held a demonstration against Mungiki activities along bus routes from Kiambu, Banana, and Githurai to Nairobi. According to Government accounts of the incident, matatu drivers burned the homes of suspected Mungiki members. Two matatu drivers were subsequently murdered. In April 2009, violence erupted between the Mungiki and a vigilante group (“the Hague”), apparently formed by residents to counter Mungiki control.
语言:中文
得分: 816802.4 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...pen&DS=A/HRC/11/2/ADD.6&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
GE.11-71052 (C) 251
Outcome area: 2.1 Policy, institutional, financial and socio-economic drivers of desertification/land degradation and barriers to SLM are assessed, and appropriate measures to remove these barriers are recommended 2.2 Affected country Parties revise their national action programmes (NAPs) into strategic documents supported by biophysical and socio-economic baseline information and include them in integrated investment frameworks Expected accomplishments (2012–2015) Performance indicators (2012–2015) 2.1.01 The development of SLM IFSs contribute to the alignment of the NAPs to The Strategy The number of IFS-related processes contributing to NAP revision and alignment Target for 2012 – 13: 12 Outcome area: 2.3 Affected country Parties integrate their NAPs and sustainable land management and land degradation issues into development planning and relevant sectoral and investment plans and policies Expected accomplishments (2012–2015) Performance indicators (2012–2015) 2.3.01 IFSs identify investment opportunities for NAP priorities in national development processes such as Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers and relevant sectoral and investment plans and policies The number of affected country Parties supported by the GM to focus strategically on the interlinkages between development, poverty reduction and DLDD/SLM finance Target for 2012 – 13: 17 Outcome area: 2.4 Developed country Parties mainstream the objectives of the Convention and SLM interventions into their development cooperation programmes/projects in line with their support to national, sectoral and investment plans Expected accomplishments (2012–2015) Performance indicators (2012–2015) 2.4.01 SLM is mainstreamed into developed country Parties development policies The number of donor platforms and individual donors that consider SLM issues in their development policies Target for 2012 – 13: 7 ICCD/CRIC(10)/L.1 GE.11-71052 11 Outcome area: 2.5 Mutually reinforcing measures among desertification/land degradation action programmes and biodiversity and climate change mitigation and adaptation are introduced or strengthened to enhance the impact of interventions Expected accomplishments (2012–2015) Performance indicators (2012–2015) 2.5.01 Increased SLM financing through synergistic implementation of the Rio conventions The number of relevant global and regional events related to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and the Convention on Biological Diversity to which the GM contributes Operational objective 5 – Financing and technology transfer “To mobilize and improve the targeting and coordination of national, bilateral and multilateral financial and technological resources in order to increase their impact and effectiveness” Outcome area: 5.1 Affected country Parties develop integrated investment frameworks for leveraging national, bilateral and multilateral resources with a view to increasing the effectiveness and impact of interventions Expected accomplishments (2012–2015) Performance indicators (2012–2015) 5.1.01 Regional and subregional platforms relevant to SLM financing functioning and supported by the GM The number of regional and subregional platforms relevant to SLM financing functioning and supported by the GM through partnerships Target for 2012 – 13: 26 5.1.02 Affected country Parties increasingly establish Integrated Investment Frameworks for SLM The number of SLM Integrated Financing Strategies and IIFs supported by the GM endorsed by affected country Parties Target for 2012 – 13: 25 5.1.03 Economic arguments in support of SLM investments are generated The number of country Parties that have assessed the economic value of land Target for 2012 – 13: 21 ICCD/CRIC(10)/L.1 12 GE.11-71052 Outcome area: 5.2 Developed country Parties provide substantial, adequate, timely and predictable financial resources to support domestic initiatives to reverse and prevent desertification/land degradation and mitigate the effects of drought 5.3 Parties increase their efforts to mobilize financial resources from international financial institutions, facilities and funds, including the Global Environment Facility (GEF), by promoting the UNCCD/sustainable land management agenda within the governing bodies of these institutions Expected accomplishments (2012–2015) Performance indicators (2012–2015) 5.2.01 Developed countries and IFIs, including the GEF, increasingly finance the SLM integrated investment frameworks Rate of increase in financing volume of developed countries’, IFIs and the GEF’s contributions to support SLM IIFs (as per FIELD and PRAIS) Target for 2012 – 13: 5% Outcome area: 5.4 Innovative sources of finance and financing mechanisms are identified to combat desertification/land degradation and mitigate the effects of drought, including from the private sector, market-based mechanisms, trade, foundations and civil society organizations, and other financing mechanisms for climate change adaptation and mitigation, biodiversity conservation and sustainable use and for hunger and poverty reduction Expected accomplishments (2012–2015) Performance indicators (2012–2015) 5.4.01 Country Parties are enabled to identify innovative resources and potential entry points for innovative sources of finance and financing mechanisms related to SLM The number of modules and approaches on innovative finance developed Target for 2012 – 13: 17 The number of organizations involved in partnerships with the GM related to innovative finance Target for 2012 – 13: 20 Expected accomplishments (2012–2015) Performance indicators (2012–2015) 5.4.02 Resources mobilized for SLM through the application of innovative sources of finance and financing mechanisms The number of countries and subregions assisted by the GM with mobilizing innovative finance Target for 2012 – 13: 39 Outcome area: 5.5 Access to technology by affected country Parties is facilitated through adequate financing, effective economic and policy incentives and technical support, notably within the framework of South-South and North-South cooperation Expected accomplishments (2012–2015) Performance indicators (2012–2015) 5.5.01 South-South and North- South partnerships allow affected country Parties to access knowledge on technology transfer Technology transfer in the context of DLDD/SLM increasingly understood through a number of initiatives Target for 2012 – 13: 7 ICCD/CRIC(10)/L.1 GE.11-71052 13 Executive direction and management Expected accomplishments (2012–2015) Performance indicators (2012–2015) X.1.01 The GM is an effective partner on financing for the Convention in international dialogues, partnerships and strategy development for servicing the Convention and its Parties JWP completed and implemented Target for 2012 – 13: Yes The proportion of the core budget adopted by the COP received for GM operations Clearance by the President of IFAD on GM inputs The number of meetings held among Facilitation Committee (FC) members Target for 2012 – 13: 2 X.2.01 Effective and transparent management of the work programme and financial resources Quality and RBM performance enforced Target for 2012 – 13: Yes Level of satisfaction of country parties with the support provided by the GM (survey) Target for 2012 – 13: 60% IFAD audit results on the GM are satisfactory Target 2012–2013: Yes Amount of voluntary contributions raised from donors Target 2012–2013: EUR 7 000 000 The number of staff development and team-building initiatives undertaken X.3.01 Communication to a wide audience of the services provided by the GM to the Convention Unique visitors per day to the website Target for 2012 – 13: 306 ICCD/CRIC(10)/L.1 14 GE.11-71052 Annex IV [English only] Multi-year workplan for the secretariat (2012–2015) Subprogramme 1 – Advocacy, awareness-raising and education To actively influence relevant international, national and local processes and actors in adequately addressing desertification/land degradation and drought-related issues. (...) Outcome area: 2.1 The policy, institutional, financial and socio-economic drivers of desertification/land degradation and barriers to SLM are assessed, and appropriate measures to remove these barriers are recommended 2.2 Affected country Parties revise their national action programmes (NAPs) into strategic documents supported by biophysical and socio-economic baseline information and include them in integrated investment frameworks 2.3 Affected country Parties integrate their NAPs, SLM and land degradation issues into development planning and relevant sectoral and investment plans and policies Expected accomplishments (2012–2015) Performance indicators (2012–2015) 2.1.1 Affected country Parties have increased support from major multilateral cooperation organizations and programmes in devising their NAPs and SLM, and addressing DLDD The extent to which the policies and approaches of UNDP1, UNEP2, WMO3, FAO,4 UNESCO5 and IUCN6 reflect the work carried out under the Convention 1 United Nations Development Programme. 2 United Nations Environment Programme. 3 World Meteorological Organization. 4 Food and Agriculture Organization. 5 United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. 6 World Conservation Union.
语言:中文
得分: 806604.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...en&DS=ICCD/CRIC(10)/L.1&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
LETTER DATED 13 FEBRUARY 2018 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVES OF CYPRUS, EGYPT AND GREECE TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
They also welcomed the Ancient Civilizations Forum (ACForum), held in Athens on 24 April 2017, focusing on culture as one of the main drivers of soft power in international relations.
语言:中文
得分: 801372.1 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...sf/get?open&DS=A/72/760&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON CONTEMPORARY FORMS OF RACISM, RACIAL DISCRIMINATION, XENOPHOBIA AND RELATED INTOLERANCE, DOUDOU DIÈNE :ADDENDUM
A report by the Department of Justice recently found that whereas white, black and Hispanic drivers were stopped by the police at similar rates, black and Hispanic drivers were approximately 2.5 times more likely to be searched; the rate of arrests was two times higher for blacks and 50 percent higher for Hispanics; blacks were 3.5 times more likely 20 See U.S.
语言:中文
得分: 796960.45 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...en&DS=A/HRC/11/36/ADD.3&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
REPORT OF THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY TO THE CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES. NOTE BY THE SECRETARIAT
The GEF-6 Programming Directions 4 , in line also with the GEF 2020 Strategy 5 , aim to help countries address key drivers of 2 GEF Council document GEF/C.50/05, Establishment of a New Trust Fund for the Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency (https://www.thegef.org/gef/sites/thegef.org/files/documents/EN_GEF.C.50.05_CBIT_TF_Establishment_0.pdf); and GEF Council document GEF/C.50/06, Programming Directions for the Capacity-building Initiative for Transparency (https://www.thegef.org/gef/sites/thegef.org/files/documents/EN_GEF.C.50.06_CBIT_Programming_Directions_0.pdf). 3 GEF Council document GEF/C.50/11, Work Program for GEF Trust Fund (https://www.thegef.org/gef/sites/thegef.org/files/documents/EN_GEF.C.50.11_Work_Program_with_Annex_v2.pdf). 4 https://www.thegef.org/gef/sites/thegef.org/files/webpage_attached/GEF6_programming_directions_final_0.pdf FCCC/CP/2016/6 12 GE.16-14987 global environmental degradation that stem from underlying global mega-trends, notably urbanization, population growth, and the rising middle class. 7. (...) The GEF-6 strategy identified three priority themes where GEF resources can address key drivers of environmental degradation at global or regional scales; tackle the most urgent time-bound issues or problems which may become too costly to reverse if not addressed; and can fulfill a critical niche to help transform and scale up the ongoing work of others.
语言:中文
得分: 772684.86 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...?open&DS=FCCC/CP/2016/6&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
LETTER DATED 24 JUNE 2016 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF AZERBAIJAN TO THE UNITED NATIONS OFFICE AT GENEVA ADDRESSED TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL
.: General 22 July 2016 Chinese Original: English A/HRC/32/G/19 2 GE.16-12661 Annex to the letter dated 24 June 2016 from the Permanent Representative of Azerbaijan to the United Nations Office at Geneva addressed to the President of the Human Rights Council The seventh global forum of the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations living together in inclusive societies: a challenge and a goal, 25-27 April 2016, Baku, Azerbaijan We, the Heads of State and Government and the Ministers of Foreign Affairs and Heads of Delegation of States belonging to the Group of Friends of the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC); Together with the Director Generals and other Heads of Delegation of international organizations also belonging to the Group of Friends of UNAOC; On the occasion of the Seventh Global Forum of the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations, held in Baku, Azerbaijan, 25-27 April 2016, which included a Youth Event as well as networking sessions organized by UNAOC partners; Reaffirming our commitment to the purposes and principles enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; Also reaffirming our commitment to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, as well as other relevant international instruments such as the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity; Acknowledging the United Nations General Assembly Resolutions A/RES/64/14 of 10 November 2009 and A/RES/69/312 of 6 July 2015, adopted by consensus, which recognize and welcome the efforts of UNAOC, express support for its practical projects, and provide UNAOC with the political guidance necessary to pursue its work in promoting intercultural dialogue, understanding and respect among civilizations, cultures, religions and beliefs, and acknowledging further the guiding principles of the Alliance outlined in the report of the High-Level Group for the Alliance of Civilizations of 13 November 2006; Stressing the importance of respect and understanding for cultural and religious diversity, of moderation as a value within societies; and encouraging tolerance, respect, dialogue and cooperation among different cultures, civilizations and peoples to expand their activities promoting a culture of peace, and to ensure that peace and non-violence are fostered at the national, subregional, regional and international levels; Encouraging UNAOC to continue to promote moderation as a universal value for attainment of peace, security and development; Convinced that the world s cultural diversity, as well as cultural heritage, is a wealth to be cherished and sustained by all as a factor of peace and development among all nations; Expressing concern about the increasing frequency and scale of acts of unlawful destruction of cultural heritage; and stressing the importance of respecting and safeguarding cultural heritage in order to promote peace and security, human rights, and sustainable development; Recognizing the importance of intercultural and interreligious dialogue and cooperation in order to promote tolerance, pluralism and mutual respect and expressing its A/HRC/32/G/19 GE.16-12661 3 support for the diverse initiatives taken by governments, international organizations and civil society in this regard; Welcoming the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and recognizing the importance of its goals and targets, including, inter alia, on promotion of peaceful and inclusive societies, for sustainable development; Acknowledging the importance of the role of the Marrakesh Declaration adopted in January 2016, on religious minorities in predominantly Muslim majority countries; Recalling the United Nations General Assembly resolution A/RES/53/22 of 4 November 1998, which declared 2001 the United Nations Year of Dialogue among Civilizations and expressed its firm determination to facilitate and promote dialogue among civilizations; Alarmed by the acts of intolerance, violent extremism, violence, including sectarian violence, and terrorism in various parts of the world, which claim innocent lives, cause destruction and displace people, and rejecting the use of violence, regardless of any motivation; Reaffirming the commitment made by all Member States under the Charter of the United Nations to promote and encourage universal respect for and observance of all human rights and fundamental freedoms without distinction, and reaffirming also that Member States are under the obligation to protect and respect all human rights and fundamental freedoms of all persons; Recognizing UNAOC’s important role in addressing the increasing distrust and polarization between and among communities caused by the fear of violent extremism, which can be conducive to terrorism; Recognizing also UNAOC s´ relevant role in raising awareness of the importance of addressing large movements of refugees and migrants, while respecting their human rights, safety and cultural diversity; Recognizing also in this regard the value added by such UNAOC initiatives as the UNAOC Fellowship Program, Entrepreneurs for Social Change (E4SC), Intercultural Leaders, the Intercultural Innovation Award, PLURAL+, Media and Information Literacy, PEACEapp, UNAOC Summer School, the Youth Solidarity Fund (YSF), and the UNAOC Hate Speech Initiative; Welcoming the initiative of the Secretary-General on preventing violent extremism and taking note in this regard of his Plan of Action aimed at addressing the drivers of violent extremism, which can be conducive to terrorism; and encouraging the UNAOC s´ contribution through relevant activities in the areas of media, migration, education, and youth in collaboration with other United Nations entities, intergovernmental organizations and civil society; Noting the important role that youth can play in preventing violent extremism violent extremism that can be conducive to terrorism and the need to promote youth’s participation and empowerment to that end; Emphasizing our common determination to combat the scourges of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, including incitement to violence based on hatred, in all their forms and manifestations for the goal of living together in inclusive societies; Reaffirming that the dialogue among civilizations can play an important role in the promotion of common grounds among civilizations, recognition and promotion of the inherent dignity and of the equal rights of all human beings and, in this way, it can assist in A/HRC/32/G/19 4 GE.16-12661 dispelling notions of cultural superiority, and facilitate the building of a reconciled world for the human family; Stressing the importance of creating synergy among the Istanbul Process, Rabat Plan of Action, Fez Action Plan, and taking into consideration the Marrakesh Declaration in this regard; Reaffirming that there is no justification for violent extremism, whatever the motivation, and that, violent extremism, in all its forms and manifestations cannot and should not be associated with any religion, race, nationality, civilization or ethnic group; Taking into account that a culture of peace actively fosters non-violence and respect for human rights and strengthens solidarity among peoples and nations and dialogue between cultures; Recognizing in each culture a dignity and value that deserve recognition, respect and preservation, convinced that, in their rich variety and diversity and in the reciprocal influences that they exert on one another, all cultures form part of the common heritage belonging to all humankind; Recognizing further that the process of globalization constitutes a powerful and dynamic force which should benefit the development and prosperity of all countries, without exclusion; noting that while globalization offers great opportunities, its benefits can be very unevenly shared, and its costs unevenly distributed; expressing our determination to prevent and mitigate the negative effects of globalization; noting that these effects could aggravate, inter alia, poverty, underdevelopment, marginalization, social exclusion, cultural homogenization and economic disparities; further expressing our determination to maximize the benefits of globalization through, inter alia, the strengthening and enhancement of international cooperation to increase opportunities for trade, economic growth and sustainable development, global communications through the use of new technologies and increased intercultural exchange through the preservation and promotion of cultural diversity, which can contribute to the eradication of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance; Emphasizing the importance of gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls, as well as women's full, equal and effective participation in decision-making processes, for the promotion of interreligious and intercultural dialogue, sustainable development and peaceful and inclusive societies; Acknowledging that tourism can enhance mutual respect, understanding and tolerance among nations by creating links between visitors and host communities that promote intercultural understanding, fight stereotypes, and contribute to a culture of peace; Recognizing that information and communications technologies are fundamentally altering the way individuals and communities interact, consume and spend their time, with new and unforeseen health and social consequences, many of which are positive and some of which raise concerns; Appreciating the leadership and contributions of the members of the Group of Friends; Expressing appreciation to previous host countries of UNAOC Global Forums: to Spain for The First Global Forum, (Madrid, January 2008); to Turkey, for the Second Global Forum, (Istanbul, April 2009); to Brazil for the Third Global Forum, (Rio, May 2010); to Qatar for the Fourth Global Forum, (Doha, December 2011); to Austria for the Fifth Global Forum, (Vienna, February 2013); and to Indonesia for the Sixth Global Forum, (Bali, August 2014); Reaffirming our support for UNAOC and its High Representative; A/HRC/32/G/19 GE.16-12661 5 Welcoming the continuing efforts made by the United Nations Secretary-General and the High Representative for the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations to strengthen the relationships between UNAOC and United Nations agencies, departments and other bodies; Recognizing the role of UNESCO in intercultural dialogue and its contribution to interreligious dialogue, as well as its activities relating to the culture of peace and non- violence and its focus on concrete actions at the global, regional and subregional levels; Acknowledging initiatives that seek to enable, empower and encourage dialogue among followers of different religions and cultures around the world, such as the Alliance of Civilizations Institute in Istanbul, Doha International Center for Interfaith Dialogue, the King Abdullah Bin Abdulaziz International Centre for Interreligious and Intercultural Dialogue in Vienna, the Istanbul Process on the implementation of HRC Resolution 16/18, Baku process, including the World Forum on Inter-Cultural Dialogue held in Baku 2011, 2013 and 2015 under UNGA Resolution 62/90, the Rabat Plan of Action elaborated under the auspices of the OHCHR, as well as the Anna Lindh Euro-Mediterranean Foundation for the Dialogue between Cultures in Alexandria, the World Nomad Games in Kyrgyzstan, the South East Europe Forum of the Dialogue among Civilizations and the World Conference on Inter- Faith and Inter-Civilization Dialogue in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, and other related initiatives and activities; Acknowledging the efforts made by the High Representative to focus the Alliance’s mission and actions to support the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals, seen in the many sessions at this Forum that focus on these critical tasks; Acknowledging the importance of leaving no one behind in the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals, as a way to counter marginalization; Expressing appreciation to the regional and sub-regional organizations, which are members of the Group of Friends of UNAOC, and are carrying out activities in line with the objectives of UNAOC in regard to its four pillars; Praising Azerbaijan, as the host country of the 7th Global Forum of the Alliance, for focusing the Baku Forum on the theme “Living Together In Inclusive Societies: A Challenge and A Goal,” as a way to harness the multiple perspectives of various sectors to meet the challenge of, and progress towards, inclusive living in today’s increasingly diverse societies, and taking note of national initiatives in this regard, including the declaration of 2016 as the Year of Multiculturalism in Azerbaijan; 1.
语言:中文
得分: 768660.74 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...t?open&DS=A/HRC/32/G/19&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
LETTER DATED 3 JUNE 2020 FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL AND THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVES OF THE MEMBERS OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL
.: General 3 June 2020 Resolution 2524 (2020) Adopted by the Security Council on 3 June 2020 The Security Council, Reaffirming all its previous resolutions and presidential statements concerning the situation in Sudan, Reaffirming its strong commitment to the sovereignty, unity, independence, and territorial integrity of Sudan, Welcoming the signing of the Constitutional Document on 17 August 2019 on the establishment of a new civilian-led transitional Government and transitional institutions, further welcoming the steps taken to date to implement the Constitutional Document and calling upon all stakeholders to remain committed to the transition in order for the aspirations of the Sudanese people for a peaceful, stable, democratic, and prosperous future to be realised, reaffirming its readiness to support Sudan in this regard and commending the vital role played by the African Union in supporting Sudan in its transition to democracy and good governance, Welcoming the commitment in the Constitutional Document to achieve a fair and comprehensive peace in Sudan by addressing the root causes and the impact of conflict, acknowledging in this regard the progress made in the peace negotiations in Juba, noting with appreciation the role of the Government of South Sudan in supporting these negotiations, urging the parties to the conflict to engage constructively to swiftly reach a peace agreement, and further urging those who have not yet engaged in peace negotiations to do so immediately, without pre-conditions, Welcoming the cessation of hostilities by many parties to the conflicts in Sudan, as well as their positive responses to the Secretary-General’s appeal for a global ceasefire amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Reaffirming the primary responsibility of the Government of Sudan to protect civilians across its territory and recognising improvements in security conditions in Darfur, acknowledging in this regard the Government of Sudan’s National Plan for Civilian Protection (S/2020/429) and the weapons-collection programme, while expressing concern that the security situation in some regions of Darfur remains S/2020/494 3/8 20-07460 precarious, and underscoring the need to protect peacebuilding gains in Darfur, avoid a relapse into conflict and mitigate the risks for the population posed inter alia by threats against civilians in Darfur, inter-communal violence, human rights violations and abuses, violations of international humanitarian law and continued displacement, Recognising the adverse effects of climate change, ecological changes and natural disasters, among other factors, on the stability of Sudan, particularly Darfur, and stressing the need for adequate risk assessment and risk management strategies by the Government of Sudan and the United Nations relating to these factors to support stabilisation and build resilience, Welcoming the decisions of the Government of Sudan to facilitate the delivery of humanitarian assistance and create more favourable conditions for humanitarian actors and encouraging the full implementation of these decisions in order to ensure rapid, safe and unhindered humanitarian access throughout Sudan, in accordance with relevant provisions of international law and in line with United Nations guiding principles of humanitarian assistance, including humanity, impartiality, neutrality, and independence Stressing the need for the Government of Sudan to ensure accountability for violations of international humanitarian law and international human rights law, and welcoming the provisions of the Constitutional Document on transitional justice and accountability measures in this regard, Stressing the primary responsibility of the Government of Sudan to address the longstanding drivers of instability and inequality in Sudan, and to engage with other stakeholders, including civil society, women, youth, and internally displaced persons, refugees and members of marginalised communities to deliver durable solutions to Sudan’s immediate and long-term issues, including through inclusive economic growth and sustainable development, social cohesion, and disaster resilience, in line with the priorities of the Constitutional Document, Recognizing the important role that women played in the peaceful political transition in Sudan, welcoming the steps taken to increase the role of women in public life, government institutions and decision-making processes, further welcoming the decision to criminalise female genital mutilation (FGM) in Sudan and encouraging the completion of all necessary administrative steps in this regard, acknowledging the Government of Sudan’s efforts to develop a National Action Plan on Women, Peace and Security, and encouraging it’s completion and full implementation, calling upon the Government of Sudan to take further steps to promote and protect women’s rights and full, equal and meaningful participation in all social, political, economic aspects of life, including by repealing all laws that discriminate against women and girls and by meeting the 40% quota for women’s participation in the Transitional Legislative Council, recognising the disproportionate impact of conflict on women and girls and calling upon on the Government of Sudan to ensure women’s full, equal and meaningful participation in peace processes, implementation of future peace agreements, conflict prevention and decision making- and reform processes related to peace and security, Underlining the importance of integrating child protection issues in Sudan’s peace processes and calling on the parties to the conflict to integrate child protection provisions, including those relating to the release and reintegration of children formerly associated with armed forces or armed groups, as well as provisions on the rights and well-being of children, into all peace negotiations, ceasefire and peace agreements, and in provisions for ceasefire monitoring and taking into account children’s views, where possible, in these processes, S/2020/494 20-07460 4/8 Emphasizing the importance of national ownership, inclusivity, and the role that civil society can play to advance national peacebuilding processes and objectives in order to ensure that the needs of all stakeholders are taken into account, Expressing grave concern about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Sudan and recognising that this presents a profound challenge to Sudan’s health system, socio-economic and humanitarian situation and populations that have already been exhausted by protracted conflict, and emphasising the importance of international support – financially, technically and in-kind – to the COVID-19 response in Sudan, Underlining the importance of the partnership between the United Nations and the African Union in Sudan, Taking note of the Special Report of the Chairperson of the African Union Commission and the Secretary-General of the United Nations (S/2020/202), Taking note of the of the African Union Peace and Security Council’s Communiqué of 3 March 2020 (PSC/PR/COMM.
语言:中文
得分: 753286.47 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc.../get?open&DS=S/2020/494&Lang=C
数据资源: ods
LETTER DATED 24 JANUARY 2019 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF TURKEY TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
The Report addressed threats to peace and security in the OIC geography, as well as drivers and impacts of conflicts, with a view to preventing and managing them.
语言:中文
得分: 753286.47 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...sf/get?open&DS=A/73/725&Lang=C
数据资源: ods