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REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON THE RIGHT OF EVERYONE TO THE ENJOYMENT OF THE HIGHEST ATTAINABLE STANDARD OF PHYSICAL AND MENTAL HEALTH, ANAND GROVER :ADDENDUM
For example, there are significant problems with respect to the portability of benefits. All insured persons are registered at the nearest local health facility once they enrol in SHI. (...) In the interim, however, the Government notes that children may use their birth certificate instead of an insurance card to receive health insurance benefits. Considering the serious problems in Viet Nam relating to the malnourishment of children under 5,35 it is essential that the Government make all efforts to ensure that all children under 6 are enrolled in the SHI and have uninterrupted access to health insurance benefits under the programme. 22. (...) Moreover, catastrophic health costs in Viet Nam have steadily remained at approximately 12 per cent.40 While under HIP the poor should not have to make co- payments for covered services, in reality they are often required to make such payments.41 Additionally, studies suggest that while those who are enrolled in HIP are entitled to the same benefits as those enrolled in other forms of the SHI, in fact, they often receive fewer benefits.42 This is especially true for people under the direct reimbursement model, in part because providers must often wait long periods of time for government reimbursement. 25.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1478745 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...en&DS=A/HRC/20/15/ADD.2&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
RPT WG TRANSN'L CORPORATIONS / TORONTO WORKSHOP
Workshop participants noted that different mechanisms have different benefits and disadvantages, and that their different processes will lead to different remedy outcomes. (...) As has been noted in previous research, interests and rights are not necessarily incompatible, but there may be a trade-off between them.6 In addition, individuals or communities who feel excluded from the benefits reaped by a business project, or who want more social investment, may articulate their views using language that refers to human rights violations or abuses. (...) Emerging lessons from operational-level grievance mechanisms include: (a) Operational-level grievance mechanisms can result in significant benefits: workshop participants from companies that have established operational-level grievance mechanisms reported significant benefits in terms of stakeholder engagement, understanding how the business is perceived in the community, and in preventing an escalation of conflict; (b) The internal credibility of the mechanism matters: one business enterprise that had established a site-level grievance mechanism testified as to the importance of integrating it within a wider social management system.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1478604.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...en&DS=A/HRC/26/25/ADD.3&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
LETTER DATED 1 OCTOBER 2019 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF MALAWI TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
We call upon the international community to come up with specific support measures for LDCs to enable them to reap the benefits of frontier technologies for achieving SDGs including through access to and adapting modern technologies, technological know-how, infrastructure and necessary logistics; 13. (...) We need to invest in our people with a fierce sense of urgency, especially in health and modern education, which are the building blocks of human capital to harness the benefits of technology and to blunt its worst disruptions;16 22. (...) However, it also brings a lot of challenges in the form of losing the entire package of LDC-specific benefits and waivers from compliance with international obligations and commitments.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1477873.4 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...sf/get?open&DS=A/74/475&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
GE.13-70246 (S)
[Agrees to enhance the relevance of the work programme [so that it achieves its expected outcomes], including by: (a) [Developing knowledge outcomes to improve understanding and assessment of impacts, vulnerability and adaptation in response to identified needs [and demands] by Parties and established bodies under the Convention, and supporting their effective dissemination at the regional, national and sub-national levels through existing knowledge networks and fora, inter alia national focal points and relevant work streams under the Convention, [including the SBI] as appropriate;] (b) [Addressing] [Considering] [Adopting] the scope of the work of the Nairobi work programme as agreed in the annex of decision 2/CP.11 through additional cross- cutting issues [, including, (i) Ecosystems; (ii) National adaptation planning; (iii) Food security; (iv) Water management; (v) Urban infrastructure; (vi) Health; (vii) Mountains;] (c) Sequencing activities so that they build on each other and engage adaptation practitioners; FCCC/SBSTA/2013/L.9 4 GE.13-70246 (d) Developing linkages with adaptation-related workstreams and bodies under the Convention, including the SBI [and the Adaptation Committee], as appropriate.] 3. (...) Encourages Parties, partner organizations and [other] users to support [effective] implementation of the work programme, including by: (a) [Placeholder for organizations outside the Convention] [Developing knowledge outcomes to improve understanding and assessment of impacts, vulnerability and adaptation in response to identified needs [and demands] by Parties and established bodies under the Convention and supporting their effective dissemination at the regional, national and sub-national levels through existing knowledge networks and fora, inter alia national focal points and relevant work streams under the Convention, [including the SBI] as appropriate]; (b) [[Engaging and catalysing] [Encouraging] [concrete] actions from relevant organizations, including those from developing countries, to support the implementation of the work programme;] (c) Increasing collaboration with regional centres and networks [including those from developing countries] that provide [and disseminate] information and knowledge at regional and national levels; 5. (...) FCCC/SBSTA/2013/L.9 6 GE.13-70246 [Appendix [English only] [Work plan referred to in paragraph 9 of the draft text] (a) For the theme of freshwater, marine and terrestrial ecosystems: (i) As part of the socioeconomic work area, develop a technical report on characterizing the socioeconomic benefits of ecosystem-based approaches to adaptation; (ii) As part of the technologies for adaptation work area, hold a workshop on the benefits and costs of green vs. grey infrastructure to help advance understanding of when different approaches are useful; and produce a related technical report that would summarize the content of the workshop and that would make the information accessible for those who could not attend; (iii) As part of the adaptation planning and practices work area, hold a series of webinars that present the results of the technical report and workshop, and highlight best practices and lessons learned to support integrating ecosystem adaptation and ecosystem-based approaches to adaptation into national adaptation planning; (b) For the theme of coastal adaptation: (i) As part of the systematic observation work area, hold a workshop on sea level rise, involving scientists and coastal zone managers, that would discuss the systematic observation of and data collection on the impacts of sea level rise and coastal inundation on coastal communities and ecosystems, and how to enhance access to, and the sharing and use of, data to facilitate the assessment and management of sea level rise; and produce a related technical report that would summarize the content of the workshop and that would make the information accessible for those who could not attend; (ii) Under the methods and tools work area, hold a second workshop on how to incorporate such information into risk and vulnerability assessments, including exploring the interactions between slow onset and extreme events; (iii) As part of the adaptation planning and practices work area, develop a set of detailed case studies that build off of select responses to “calls for action” to NWP Partners, and that summarize lessons learned from various communities that are making notable progress in this area.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1473535.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...&DS=FCCC/SBSTA/2013/L.9&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
VIEWS ON THE DRAFT PROPOSAL BY THE CHAIR :SUBMISSIONS FROM PARTIES
Therefore, in relation to the text, we see option 2 as a base to analyze the subject. In relation to Co-benefits, in our view, the main reason for the introduction of Co-benefits as eligibility criteria for registration of projects under the CDM is to establish a more even and less discretional ground to determine projects’ contributions to sustainable development. It is our belief that the CDM should aim to deal with mitigation activities that are financially challenging for developing countries; therefore, co-benefits can contribute to the development of more expensive mitigation options for developing countries and yet be a cost-effective mitigation action for developed countries. (...) The evaluation of the co-benefits requires the definition of indicators; however, these indicators are to be determined and agreed by designated national authorities.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1470813.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...FCCC/KP/AWG/2010/MISC.6&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS, ESPECIALLY WOMEN AND CHILDREN, JOY NGOZI EZEILO : ADDENDUM
Other speakers highlighted a key model of ethical recruitment, the business benefits of the model, some of the challenges faced in implementing it and the measures that help to eliminate risks of trafficking for workers. (...) Are changes to contracts of employment prohibited that diminish originally anticipated wages, benefits or other conditions of work? 10. Do you monitor subcontractors and the contractual agreements they hold with their workforce? (...) Are workers paid at least the minimum wage required by applicable laws and provided all legally mandated benefits? 19. Are wage payments made at regular intervals directly to the worker and/or their bank account, and not delayed, deferred or withheld?
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1464729.7 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...en&DS=A/HRC/23/48/ADD.4&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
LETTER DATED 14 SEPTEMBER 2016 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF CHINA TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
We commit to strengthen communication, cooperation and relevant research on the NIR, facilitate small and medium -sized enterprises (SMEs) to leverage benefits from the NIR, address employment and workforce skill challenges, encourage more cooperation on standards, adequate and effective IPR protection in line with existing multilateral treaties to which they are parties, new industrial infrastructure, and support industrialization, as committed in the action plan. (...) We call for cooperation to maximize the benefits and mitigate the negative impact of the expected technological and industrial changes. (...) We are committed to ensuring the benefits of our growth reach all people and maximize the growth potential of developing and low -income countries.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1463908.6 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...sf/get?open&DS=A/71/380&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
REVIEW OF THE KYOTO PROTOCOL PURSUANT TO ITS ARTICLE 9 : SUBMISSIONS FROM PARTIES
A perspective of sustainable development is also essential in the new visions and concepts on which a long-term, effective framework is constructed. The relation between economic development and the combat against climate change should not be perceived as trade-off, but rather, as the relation that provides co-benefits and synergies. (...) Actions by governments to address other issues can often bring important climate change co- benefits. 6. Annex I Parties that have ratified the Kyoto Protocol will be responsible for a decreasing proportion of world emissions. 7. (...) Potential responses: policies and measures and technologies 6. Cost and benefits of emissions reductions (including win-win options) in global and regional aspects 7.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1463717 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...FCCC/KP/CMP/2006/MISC.3&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
LETTER DATED 18 SEPTEMBER 2022 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF CHINA TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
— We need to advocate consultation, cooperation and shared benefits in global governance and adopt a Member States-led and action-oriented approach to improve the global governance system. (...) Belt and Road cooperation is guided by the principle of extensive consultation, joint contribution and shared benefits. It follows the concept of open, green and clean development, and is aimed at high-standard, people-centered and sustainable growth. (...) Comprehensive measures should be taken to ensure women and children enjoy the various benefits of development. We should support the UN in its leading and coordinating role and strengthen international cooperation on women and children
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1463225.6 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...sf/get?open&DS=A/77/353&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON EXTREME POVERTY AND HUMAN RIGHTS, MAGDALENA SEPULVEDA CARMONA : ADDENDUM
The Republic of Moldova still faces poverty issues across most of the country. Moreover, the benefits of economic growth have not been widely shared, in geographic and social terms.4 There is a widening gap between urban and rural areas and some groups remain at the margins or are excluded from social, political and economic processes.5 7. (...) Adequately informing the population about laws and plans of action is equally important to ensure their effective implementation. When speaking with persons and communities living in poverty, the Special Rapporteur noted that many did not have correct information about their rights and benefits under policies that directly affect their lives. 20. (...) A person placed under guardianship — frequently a person with mental or intellectual disabilities — loses all standing before the law and cannot engage in even the most basic social and legal acts, such as marriage, voting, claiming social benefits, consenting to or refusing medication. Persons placed under guardianship also have no standing to appeal the guardianship measure.
Idioma:Español
Puntuación: 1458424 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...en&DS=A/HRC/26/28/ADD.2&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods