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The health and social effects of nonmedical cannabis use Global Regions WHO Regional websites Africa Americas South-East Asia Europe Eastern Mediterranean Western Pacific When autocomplete results are available use up and down arrows to review and enter to select. (...) In 2013, an estimated 181.8 million people aged 15-64 years used cannabis for nonmedical purposes globally (uncertainty estimates 128.5–232.1 million) (UNODC, 2015). There is an increasing demand of treatment for cannabis use disorders and associated health conditions in high- and middle-income countries, and there has been increased attention to the public health aspects of cannabis use and related disorders in international drug policy dialogues.
Language:English
Score: 1749021.3 - https://www.who.int/publicatio...-detail-redirect/9789241510240
Data Source: un
Ambassador Khan @ambmansoorkhan , @CND_tweets Chair, opens the 63rd reconvened session – starting with the voting on @WHO scheduling recommendations on cannabis and cannabis-related substances @UNODC @UN_Vienna . (...) Meanwhile, the United States voted to remove cannabis from Schedule IV of the Single Convention while retaining them in Schedule I, saying it is “consistent with the science demonstrating that while a safe and effective cannabis-derived therapeutic has been developed, cannabis itself continues to pose significant risks to public health and should continue to be controlled under the international drug control conventions”. (...) Recreational cannabis poses ‘significant’ health challenges to youth: drugs control body 5 March 2019 Health The UN-backed International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) warned on Tuesday that poorly regulated medical cannabis programmes could step-up the “recreational” use of the drug while diminishing public concern over its harmful effects.
Language:English
Score: 1738696 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2020/12/1079132
Data Source: un
Synthetic cannabinoids mimic the effects of cannabis but are more potent and are associated with a range of severe adverse effects, including death. Synthetic cathinones are stimulants with similar effects as other central nervous system stimulants (i.e. cocaine), and pose a significant risk of abuse and dependence. The CND decided to postpone a vote on the recommendations made by WHO for a more rational system of international control of cannabis and cannabis-related substances that would prevent drug-related harms while ensuring that cannabis-derived pharmaceutical preparations are available for medical and scientific use.
Language:English
Score: 1734895.9 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...ontrols-of-dangerous-fentanyls
Data Source: un
In 2018, WHO’s ECDD carried out a formal review of cannabis and all cannabis-related substances that are currently subject to international control measures.  (...) The Committee went on to scientifically review cannabis and other products derived from the cannabis plant, and made a series of recommendations that would  more effectively control cannabis preparations with high levels of delta-9-THC (dronabinol), and allow further research and development of and improve access to cannabis-related medicines whilst also minimizing public health problems associated with non-medical cannabis products.   (...) Reclassification of cannabis and cannabis resin will remove some international procedural barriers to research and development of cannabis-based medical products according to national regulatory frameworks. 
Language:English
Score: 1707423.8 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...recognize-its-therapeutic-uses
Data Source: un
NPS are synthetic substances developed to produce effects on the central nervous system similar to those of other psychoactive substances, such as opioids, cannabis or amphetamines. (...) Cannabidiol (CBD) There is increased interest from Member States in the use of cannabis for medical indications including for palliative care. Responding to that interest and increase in use, WHO has in recent years gathered more robust scientific evidence on therapeutic use and side effects of cannabis and cannabis components. To that end, the ECDD did an initial review of a cannabis compound called cannabidiol (CBD).
Language:English
Score: 1680951.8 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...r-synthetic-opioid-carfentanil
Data Source: un
This is the first time that the ECDD carries out a full review of cannabis and cannabis-related substances since the International Drug Control Conventions were established in 1961 and 1971. Until now, cannabis has been under the strictest control (schedules 1 and 4) – i.e. at the same level as heroin. At the meeting, the ECDD is expected to make recommendations about the appropriateness of the current international scheduling of cannabis and cannabis-related substances. The aim of these recommendations is to ensure that international control measures can effectively protect people’s health, in particular the most vulnerable, but do not limit access to cannabis derived products with proven therapeutic properties.
Language:English
Score: 1662578 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...-cannabis-and-other-substances
Data Source: un
However, where CBD is produced for pharmaceutical purposes as an extract of cannabis, cannabis extracts and tinctures are included in the 1961 UN Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs. A fuller review of extracts or preparations containing almost exclusively CBD will take place in June 2018, when the WHO expert committee will undertake a comprehensive review of cannabis and cannabis related substances. Not scheduling a substance means that it is not subject to strict international controls, including for production and supply. (...) The New England Journal of Medicine also published a study lately saying there is some evidence it may be effective during epileptic seizures. This means it could have some medical use but more evidence is needed.
Language:English
Score: 1652489.5 - https://www.who.int/news-room/...abidiol-(compound-of-cannabis)
Data Source: un
The decriminalization of cannabis in some countries is criticized by the INCB, whose President, Cornelis P. de Joncheere , said that, of internationally controlled substances, the drug continues to play the most prominent role amongst adolescents and adults.   (...) Prevention programmes should include a focus on family and parenting skills, setting rules and limits for young people; school support for the development of personal and social skills; the availability of screening, assessment and counselling in schools; and strict enforcement of regulations related to the access to medications with psychoactive qualities, and to tobacco, alcohol and cannabis. A drug addict consumes heroin in the Russian Cultural Palace in Kabul., by UNAMA /Najeeb Farzad To improve the effectiveness of prevention programmes, governments, says the report, should monitor changing trends in the use of psychoactive drugs amongst young people, and invest in the development of national expertise. (...) INCB | drugs Related Stories Graft plagues global anti-narcotics efforts – UN panel UN anti-narcotics panel calls for better support for youth and marginalized INTERVIEW: Head of UN drug body urges greater access to treatment for women News Tracker: Past Stories on This Issue Recreational cannabis poses ‘significant’ health challenges to youth: drugs control body 5 March 2019 Health The UN-backed International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) warned on Tuesday that poorly regulated medical cannabis programmes could step-up the “recreational” use of the drug while diminishing public concern over its harmful effects.
Language:English
Score: 1640586.5 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2020/02/1058151
Data Source: un
The risks of poorly controlled medical #cannabis programmes are highlighted in the International Narcotics Control Board Annual Report published today. (...) Sumyai explained that there is “a great deal of misunderstanding about the safety, regulation and distribution of cannabis, particularly where recreational use has been legalized or medical cannabis programmes are expanding.” (...) “Our report’s focus on the use of cannabis and cannabinoids is coming at the right time, with recent legislative developments in a number of countries”, Mr.
Language:English
Score: 1611088.7 - https://news.un.org/en/story/2019/03/1034061
Data Source: un
En 1996, on a saisi plus de 1 367 tonnes de cannabis, 2 524 tonnes de feuilles de cannabis (marijuana) et 813 tonnes de résine de cannabis (haschisch), soit plus de 4 700 tonnes de produits de cannabis, c'est-à-dire beaucoup plus que les 3 15 tonnes de cocaïne ou les 28 tonnes d'héroïne saisies en 1996. (...) Le cannabis d'Asie du Sud-Est fait également l'objet d'un trafic vers l'Australie, bien que ce pays ait sa propre production de cannabis, qui est importante. (...) En Amérique du Nord et en Europe occidentale, la consommation de cocaïne est désormais plus fréquente que celle d'héroïne. Cannabis La consommation de cannabis (fréquence annuelle) est estimée toucher 2,4% de la population mondiale.
Language:English
Score: 1509965.1 - https://www.un.org/french/ga/20special/presskit/fiched2.htm
Data Source: un