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REPORT OF THE SUBCOMMISSION ON ILLICIT DRUG TRAFFIC AND RELATED MATTERS IN THE NEAR AND MIDDLE EAST ON ITS FORTY-SECOND SESSION, HELD IN AGRA, INDIA, FROM 3 TO 7 DECEMBER 2007
The working group on cannabis plant cultivation and cannabis trafficking in the region of the Subcommission held one meeting, on 4 December 2007. (...) Cannabis resin was a significant drug of abuse within the region; (b) Afghanistan was a major producer of cannabis resin. (...) States must review the way in which they respond to trafficking in cannabis, so as to ensure that their countermeasures were effective; (f) Governments should undertake authoritative surveys of the extent to which organized cannabis plant cultivation was taking place on their territory.
Language:English
Score: 1160978.7 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...&DS=UNODC/SUBCOM/2007/5&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
SEIZURES OF NARCOTICS EFFECTED AT ATLANTIC COAST AND MEXICAN GULF PORTS AND IN HONOLULU, T.H., DURING SEPTEMBER, OCTOBER, NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER 1946 : CONVENTION OF 13 JULY 1931 FOR LIMITING THE MANUFACTURE AND REGULATING THE DISTRIBUTION OF NARCOTIC DRUGS AS AMENDED BY THE PROTOCOL SIGNED AT LAKE SUCCESS 11 DECEMBER 1946 : UNITED STATES OF AMERICA : REPORT NO. 1147 COMMUNICATED BY THE GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON 24 JUNE 1947
Remarks: There appears below. a summary of cannabis seizures effected at Atlantic Coast and Mexican Gulf ports and in Honolulu, T.H., during the months of September, October, November, and December 1946. (...) :rr:.e.rican citizen Quantities of cannabis seized: 15 grains, (l gramme), net, of marihuana. (...) So-called "shoes" of cannabis consisting of the dried tops, leaves, stems, and seeds of the cannabis plant rolled into a funnel-shaped package and wrapped in palm leaves appear to be common to Lourenco Marques.
Language:English
Score: 1160878.8 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...t?open&DS=E/NS.1947/186&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
COMMISSION ON NARCOTIC DRUGS : REPORT OF THE 20TH SESSION (29 NOVEMBER - 21 DECEMBER 1965)
The question of the coca leaf 8. The question of cannabis and cannabis research 9. Questions relating to the control of substances not under international control (barbiturates, tranquillizers, amphe­ tamines, etc.) 10. (...) Abuse of drug (drug addiction), in particular its economic and social aspects 6. Opium, cannabis and coca leaf; research on opium, cannabis and other substances 7. (...) Some members of the Commission observed that one of the articles dealing with cannabis which had been published in a recent issue expressed ideas which were contrary to the position taken by the Commission on the question of cannabis and, in particular, on the cri­ minogenic action of this narcotic drug; in their view, an article of that nature could not fail to injure the cause of national and international control of narcotic drugs.
Language:English
Score: 1158568.2 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...et?open&DS=E/4140(SUPP)&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
REPORT OF THE SIXTEENTH MEETING OF HEADS OF NATIONAL DRUG LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES, AFRICA, HELD IN NAIROBI FROM 25 TO 29 SEPTEMBER 2006
Illicit cultivation of cannabis plant in Africa, trafficking in cannabis and its impact 3. The following recommendations were made with regard to the illicit cultivation of cannabis plant in Africa, trafficking in cannabis and its impact: (a) Governments should be encouraged to formally assess the domestic threat of cannabis in order to support the development of effective national strategies to combat cannabis cultivation, trafficking and abuse; (b) Governments should take steps to initiate national awareness-raising campaigns that engage rural communities in support of discouraging cannabis 4 UNODC/HONLAF/2006/5 cultivation, together with similar initiatives directed at towns and cities, where demand for cannabis has encouraged its ongoing proliferation; (c) Governments should be encouraged to develop cannabis eradication programmes to effectively discourage its ongoing cultivation and offer viable economic alternatives to rural communities whose incomes are derived from illicit cannabis production. (...) In rural areas, its illicit cultivation increased tribal and family conflict over land use; (d) Eradication programmes that physically uprooted, slashed and burned cultivation sites had proven very effective in disrupting illicit cannabis cultivation. 26.
Language:English
Score: 1158238 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...&DS=UNODC/HONLAF/2006/5&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
WORLD SITUATION WITH REGARD TO DRUG ABUSE, IN PARTICULAR AMONG CHILDREN AND YOUTH : NOTE / BY THE SECRETARIAT
The same study reports 2.2 per cent for cannabis and 0.5 per cent for cocaine. B. Americas 1. (...) Among the major abused drugs, statistically significant increases are reported for cannabis, amphetamines and cocaine. Cannabis abuse at least once in a lifetime increased from 5 per cent in 1993 to 7.6 per cent in 1997. (...) In Chile, the abuse of cannabis among students is particularly high (see figure IV).
Language:English
Score: 1158235.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...t?open&DS=E/CN.7/2001/4&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
THE CONSEQUENCES OF CANNABIS USE : REFOCUSING PREVENTION, EDUCATION AND TREATMENT EFFORTS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE : REVISED DRAFT RESOLUTION / AZERBAIJAN, LEBANON, UKRAINE AND UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Appeals to Member States and relevant international organizations to continue to raise awareness of the health risks of cannabis use among youth and adults; 2. Invites Member States to share effective, evidence-based strategies and best practices for preventing the use of cannabis by children and young people in order to protect those vulnerable populations from the health risks associated with cannabis use; 3. (...) Requests Member States to give special attention to raising awareness among pregnant women of the risks involved in smoking cannabis; 7. Encourages Member States to consider carrying out qualitative and quantitative studies on the use of cannabis by young people, including children, and to collect comparable, data with removed identifiers on visits to hospitals or __________________ 5 United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 520, No. 7515. 6 Ibid., vol. 976, No. 14152. 3 E/CN.7/2008/L.3/Rev.2 dedicated health-care facilities and on treatment demand related to cannabis use in order to better understand the extent of cannabis use; 8. Calls upon Member States to further examine the scientific and medical data available on the health consequences of cannabis use.
Language:English
Score: 1156757.2 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...S=E/CN.7/2008/L.3/REV.2&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
IMPLEMENTATION OF THE RECOMMENDATIONS ADOPTED BY THE 22ND MEETING OF HEADS OF NATIONAL DRUG LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES, AFRICA
Responses from member States to questionnaire Issue 1: Effective responses to meet the challenges of illicit cultivation of, and trafficking in, cannabis Recommendation 1 4. (...) Togo noted that its law enforcement authorities were well and regularly trained and equipped and that they worked effectively in coordination with other national actors to combat the regional trafficking of cannabis. (...) Most Governments that returned the questionnaire had taken measures to implement the recommendations on effective responses to meet the challenges of illicit cultivation of, and trafficking in cannabis.
Language:English
Score: 1156587.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...en&DS=UNODC/HONLAF/24/3&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
WORLD SITUATION WITH REGARD TO DRUG TRAFFICKING : REPORT OF THE SECRETARIAT
Based on data for the period 2003-2008, approximately one half of all seizures worldwide involved cannabis herb, cannabis resin or cannabis oil. Cannabis herb was the most frequently seized drug in Africa, the Americas and Oceania, while cannabis resin was the most frequently seized drug in Europe, followed by cannabis herb. 1. (...) In spite of the fact that data from some key African countries for 2008 were not available at the time of preparation of the present report, the preliminary total quantity of cannabis herb seizures effected by African countries in 2008 (884 tons) already exceeded the total for 2007 (629 tons) by 41 per cent. (...) The marked increase in 2008 was mainly due to a single extraordinarily large seizure of 236.8 tons of cannabis resin effected by Afghan authorities in Kandahar province in June 2008. 39.
Language:English
Score: 1155950.9 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...t?open&DS=E/CN.7/2010/4&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
DRAFT REPORT : ADDENDUM : 25TH MEETING OF HEADS OF NATIONAL DRUG LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES, AFRICA (ALGIERS, 14-18 SEPTEMBER 2015)
UNODC/HONLAF/25/L.1/Add.3 15 September 2015 Original: English* V.15-06549 (E) *1506549* Twenty-fifth Meeting of Heads of National Drug Law Enforcement Agencies, Africa Algiers, 14-18 September 2015* Agenda item 9 Adoption of the report Draft report Rapporteur: Alita Mbahwe (Zambia) Addendum Consideration of topics by working groups Issue (a): Designing effective strategies to address cannabis trafficking 1. (...) In its consideration of the topic under review, the working group made the following observations: (a) Cannabis cultivation and production affect a significant proportion of African countries, while cannabis trafficking, both in the form of herb and resin, affects the continent as a whole; (b) Illicit cultivation of cannabis destroys hundreds of hectares of forests, degrades the quality of the soil and encourages erosion, while dependency upon cannabis as a crop reduces agricultural skills and leads to a loss of important farming techniques; (c) In order to have sustainable cannabis eradication programmes in vulnerable rural communities, there is a need to consider wide ranging options that encourage a change of mind set among farmers on cannabis being their livelihood by offering alternative development programmes and investments in rural community infrastructures; __________________ * Available only in Arabic, English and French, which are the working languages of the subsidiary body. 2 V.15-06549 UNODC/HONLAF/25/L.1/Add.3 (d) There are still many challenges to cooperation among law enforcement authorities across the region, particularly in the exchange of information, coordination of operations and the provision of support in undertaking enquiries related to current investigations. 2. The working group drew up the following conclusions: (a) The cost to marginalized rural communities of illicit cannabis cultivation is too high in terms of the destruction of natural resources, efficient land use and lost farming skills; (b) There is a need for more detailed and robust data on cannabis cultivation and production, as well as its trafficking in order to achieve an appropriate analysis and effective monitoring of trends, with the view to enabling more informed planning policies; (c) There should be well articulated national strategies to address the illicit cultivation of cannabis based upon the accurate analysis of the economical and social situation of the rural communities engaged in cultivation; (d) Drug enforcement authorities should be encouraged and supported to establish official lines of communication with their foreign law enforcement counterparts to regularly communicate two-way exchanges of information gathered related to combating illicit trafficking. 3.
Language:English
Score: 1155509.8 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...ODC/HONLAF/25/L.1/ADD.3&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
STATEMENT SUBMITTED BY THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR HOSPICE & PALLIATIVE CARE, A NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION IN CONSULTATIVE STATUS WITH THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COUNCIL
E/CN.7/2020/NGO/9 V.20-07136 2/3 Statement Cannabis as Medicine: A Jamaican Experience By Dr. (...) Cannabis as medicine was first introduced to Europe in the mid-1800s and by the 1850s cannabis was listed in both British and American pharmacopoeia and could be prescribed by medical doctors. (...) THC and CBD are two of the principal components of the cannabis plant and of modern-day cannabis-containing medicines.
Language:English
Score: 1155318.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...en&DS=E/CN.7/2020/NGO/9&Lang=E
Data Source: ods