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LETTER DATED 11 JULY 2019 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF PORTUGAL TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
وةإل افة إىل “الشباب والسال واألمن” وحقول ا واحلق يف التعليم والعمل الالئق و ااق واـــامل يتع د اإلعالن بدعم متكل الشـــباب ومشـــاركت م ا يف ذلك ذلك يف إطار هنج واســـل الن .2030يف تن ي اة التنمية املستدامة لعا وأرجو ممتنــا تعميم جــ ر الرســــــــــــــــالــة ومرفق ــا ةعتبــارمهــا وثيقــة من و ئق اجلمعيــة العــامــة يف إطــار )ب( من جدول األعمال. 28 البند دواريت لوبيس( فرانسيسكو توليل) الس A/73/949 2/7 19-12164 Lisboa+21 Declaration on Youth Policies and Programmes 2019 Convened in the World Conference of Ministers responsible for Youth 2019 and the Youth Forum Lisboa+21, organized by the Portuguese Government and the Portuguese National Youth Council, in cooperation with United Nations-system part- ners, in Lisboa, on the 22nd and the 23rd of June 2019, Reaffirming the World Programme of Action for Youth adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations in its reso- lution 50/81 of 14 December 1995 and 62/126 of 18 December 2007, which provides a policy framework and practical guidelines for national action and international support to improve the situation of young people around the world, within fifteen youth priority areas; Recalling further General Assembly resolution 70/1 of 25 September 2015, entitled “Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”, in which for the first time the Assembly recognized children and youth as agents of change, and recognizing that the Sustainable Development Goals are integrated, indivisible and universal in nature, and therefore that all of them apply to youth; Reaffirming the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and all human rights instruments relevant, to protect promote and fulfil the human rights of all young people, as well as regional human rights instruments that particularly target youth or are relevant to young people; Affirming the pioneer role of the Lisbon Declaration on Youth Policies and Programmes (1998) and recalling the relevance of its commitments, and further recognizing the International Youth Years celebrated thereto, Welcoming the establishment of the function of the United Nations Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth (2013) and under- lining the Envoy’s important task, as Chair of the High-Level Steering Committee for the United Nations Youth Strategy “Youth 2030” (2018); Reiterating the need to protect, promote and fulfil the human rights of all young people in all their diversity and recognizing that the human rights of all young people are not fully realized and further underlining the importance of addressing the specific needs of all young people, giving particular attention to young women and girls, marginalized groups and young people belonging to vulnerable groups or in vulnerable situations, including indigenous youth, youth in rural areas, youth with disabilities, young migrants or those who face discrimination based on any other ground or on multiple grounds, in line with the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development commitment to leave no one behind and reach the furthest behind first; Express further concern that adolescent girls and young women continue to encounter and be disproportionally affected by significant legal, cultural, social and economic barriers affecting their empowerment and equal opportunities to reach their full potential due to discriminatory laws, stereotypes and sexism from a young age, institutions, attitudes and harmful practices, such as child, early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation, unequal pay for work of equal value, adolescent pregnancy, sexual and gender-based violence, lack of political inclusion, unpaid care work, legal impediments A/73/949 19-12164 3/7 and restrictions and securing employment, lower wages, and further acknowledge that age and gender are characteristics that often intersect, add to and multiply discrimination based on other grounds; Acknowledging that the current generation of youth is the largest one ever and reaffirming that a large youth population presents a unique demographic dividend that can contribute to lasting peace and to achieving sustainable development in its three dimensions: economic, social, and environmental, if inclusive and effective policies are in place; Recognizing that the international community faces increasing challenges posed by today’s rapidly changing environment and marked by evolving and mutually-reinforced shifts of geopolitical, demographic, climatic, technological, social, cultural and economic nature, creating unparalleled conditions for progress but, upending the established order, and creating new and interlinked challenges for youth and societies at large in ensuring respect for their human rights in all areas; Acknowledging that meaningful youth participation, engagement and empowerment are instrumental in all stages of youth policymaking processes and decision-making processes that affect young people’s lives at local, national, regional and international levels, and that youth remain largely excluded from formal decision-making and political participation, and recognizing further that new forms of political, economic, cultural and societal engagement and participation have emerged, based on specific issues and contexts, utilizing both online and offline methods; Acknowledging the important link between migration and development, recognizing that migration brings both opportu- nities and challenges to countries of origin, transit and destination, to migrants and to the global community, and recog- nizing the responsibility to promote and protect the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all migrants effectively, regardless of their migration status, especially those of women, young people and children; Expressing concern that among civilians, youth account for many of those adversely affected by armed conflict, including as refugees and internally displaced persons, and that the disruption of youth’s access to education, leisure time and eco- nomic opportunities has a dramatic impact on durable peace and reconciliation; Affirming that generating decent work and quality employment for youth is one of the biggest challenges that needs to be tackled, and emphasizing the priority areas of the World Programme of Action for Youth linked to the employability of youth, including education, health and access to information, while recognizing the rapidly changing future of work re- quires critical investments in foresight activities on the part of governments; adaptable social, economic, political and legal institutions; young people’s capabilities and their opportunities for life-long learning and the provision of social protection; Noting the variation of definition of the term youth that may exist at the national and international levels and underlining the importance of recognizing that young people go through different stages, from dependence of childhood to adult- hood´s independence, including adolescence, requiring explicit attention on the policies and programmes involving youth; A/73/949 4/7 19-12164 WE, MINISTERS RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUTH AND YOUTH DELEGATES, WITHIN OUR RESPECTIVE COMPETENCES, COMMIT OURSELVES TO: 1. (...) Promote environmental policies and initiatives aimed at building the capacity of youth as driving force for action required to address the challenges posed by climate change, encouraging partnerships between governments, intergovernmental, non-governmental, private sector and youth-led organizations and promote the meaningful participation and engagement of youth in climate action in order to mitigate climate-related disasters, as well as integrate sustainable natural resource management, and human security into local, national, regional and international development strategies, while addressing the challenges related to demographic change, intensifying urbanization, overexploitation of natural resources, accelerat- ing pollution, rise of sea levels, conservation and sustainable use of oceans, seas and marine resources and environmental A/73/949 19-12164 5/7 degradation, aimed at ensuring a holistic approach to environmental, economic, and social sustainability for future gener- ations; 6.
لغة:العربية
نتيجة: 837252.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...sf/get?open&DS=A/73/949&Lang=A
مصدر البيانات: ods
LETTER DATED 29 JANUARY 2021 FROM THE PRESIDENT OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL AND THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVES OF THE MEMBERS OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL
.: General 29 January 2021 Resolution 2561 (2021) Adopted by the Security Council on 29 January 2021 The Security Council, Welcoming the report of the Secretary-General of 10 January 2021 on his Good Offices S/2021/5 and on the United Nations operation in Cyprus (S/2021/4), and ex- pressing its full support for his Good Offices, including the existing body of work, to remain available to assist the sides, Underscoring that the responsibility for finding a solution lies first and foremost with the Cypriots themselves, and reaffirming the primary role of the United Nations in assisting the parties to bring the Cyprus conflict and division of the island to a comprehensive and durable settlement with a sense of urgency, Expressing full support for the Secretary General’s ongoing efforts, and wel- coming his intention to convene an informal “five plus UN meeting” with the leaders of the two Cypriot communities and the Guarantor powers at the earliest opportunity, further welcoming the stated determination of the leaders of the two communities to respond positively in this regard to find common ground between the parties to nego- tiate a sustainable lasting solution to the Cyprus problem within a foreseeable hori- zon, Urging the sides to renew their efforts to achieve an enduring, comprehensive and just settlement based on a bicommunal, bizonal federation with political equality, as set out in relevant Security Council resolutions, including OP4 of its resolution 716 (1991), Stressing that the status quo is unsustainable, and that the lack of an agreement furthers political tensions and deepens the estrangement of both communities, risking irreversible changes on the ground, and reducing the prospects of a settlement, Expressing deep concern at the ongoing tensions in the eastern Mediterranean over hydrocarbons exploration, convinced of the many important benefits, including economic benefits, for all Cypriots that would flow from a comprehensive and durable settlement, and reiterating the Secretary-General’s call for serious efforts to avoid any further escalation and to defuse tensions, S/2021/96 21-01224 3/7 Recalling its Presidential Statement (S/PRST/2020/9),which expresses deep concern at developments in Varosha, and calls for the reversal of this course of action, reaffirming the status of Varosha as set out in its previous resolutions, and reiterating that no actions should be carried out in relation to Varosha that are not in accorda nce with those resolutions, and stressing the need to avoid any unilateral actions that could trigger tensions on the island and undermine the prospects for a peaceful settlement, Recalling its resolution 1325 (2000) and related resolutions, recognising that the full, equal and meaningful participation and leadership of women is essential in building peace in Cyprus and will contribute to making any future settlement sustain- able, welcoming efforts to bring together a broader range of women actors on both sides, acknowledging that the gender-sensitive socio-economic impact assessment that was launched 17 February 2020 in response to resolution 2453 (2019) substanti- ated that delaying a settlement in Cyprus increases both the economic, and non- eco- nomic costs of the prevailing political status quo, looking forward to the full and swift implementations of its recommendations, encouraging the sides to ensure the needs and perspectives of women are addressed in a future settlement, Recalling its resolution 2250 (2015) and related resolutions that recognise the important and positive contribution of youth in efforts for the maintenance and pro- motion of peace and security, and as a key aspect of the sustainability, inclusiveness and success of peacekeeping and peacebuilding efforts, and further encourages the full, equal and meaningful participation of youth in this process, Recognising that effective contact and communication between the sides en- hances the prospects for settlement and is in the interests of all Cypriots, and helps to address island-wide matters, including health, crime, environmental protection, and issues related to the adverse impacts of climate change, Recognising the ongoing impact on the island of Cyprus of the COVID-19 pan- demic and the efforts made by both communities to suppress the spread of the virus and mitigate its effects, Regretting that the sides have continued to pursue largely uncoordinated re- sponses to the COVID-19 pandemic and expressing concern that the closure of the crossing points along the Green line has limited opportunities for bi -communal en- gagement and trust-building activities, and that the continued and prolonged closure of some crossing points threatens to set back the progress made in this area since 2003, Expressing concern at the continued deterioration of the law and order situation in Pyla, and urging both sides to continue to work with UNFICYP to establish effec- tive measures to tackle criminal activities, Reiterating the importance of confidence-building measures and their timely implementation, and urging the sides to step up their efforts to promote intercommu- nal contacts, reconciliation and the active engagement of civil society, in particular women and youth, Noting that the Government of Cyprus is agreed that in view of the prevailing conditions on the island it is necessary to keep the United Nations Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) beyond 31 January 2021, Welcoming measures to date to strengthen the liaison and engagement capacity of the mission, noting the importance of transition planning in relation to the settle- ment, and emphasising the need to review regularly all peacekeeping operations, in- cluding UNFICYP, to ensure efficiency and effectiveness, S/2021/96 4/7 21-01224 Expressing appreciation to Member States that contribute personnel to UN- FICYP, and noting the continued voluntary contributions to the funding of UNFICYP by the Government of Cyprus and the Government of Greece, Noting with appreciation the efforts of the Secretary-General, his Special Rep- resentative Elizabeth Spehar, and senior United Nations official Jane Holl Lute, 1. (...) Recalls its resolution 2537 (2020) and calls upon the two leaders urgently to: (a) provide the necessary political support and overall guidance to free the Technical Committees from obstructions in their work and enable them to function effectively, and to empower them to submit proposals for their consideration to en- hance intercommunal contacts and improve the daily lives of all Cypriots, and con- sider the advice of the Good Offices Mission of the Secretary-General regarding fur- ther ways to empower the Technical Committees and improve their performance; (b) engage the Technical Committees more actively to ensure effective coor- dination and cooperation on health matters, particularly in response to the COVID - 19 pandemic and other infectious diseases which have island-wide implications, in- cluding through the effective use of the expertise available in the bi -communal Tech- nical Committees on Health, Crisis Management, Humanitarian Affairs and Economic Matters; (c) ensure effective coordination and cooperation on criminal matters; (d) promote peace education across the island, including by further empower- ing the Technical Committee on Education to implement the recommendations con- tained in its joint report of 2017, in particular those concerning policy -making, and to address impediments to peace in school materials, including text books, as a con- tribution to trust-building between the communities, on which there continues to be no progress; (e) improve the public atmosphere for negotiation to secure a settlement, in- cluding by preparing the communities for a settlement through public messages on the way ahead, and delivering more constructive and harmonised messages, including by more explicitly encouraging contact and cooperation between the communities and providing direct support to grassroots people-to-people initiatives, and by refraining from actions or rhetoric that detracts from a successful process or could make it more difficult to achieve; S/2021/96 21-01224 5/7 (f) increase their support to, and ensure a meaningful role for, civil society engagement in peace efforts, in particular strengthening the participation of women’s organisations and youth in the process, including by empowering the Technical Com- mittee on Gender Equality to meet and develop an action plan supporting women’s full, equal, and meaningful participation in peace talks and providing direct support and encouragement to civil society organisations to enhance inter-communal contact and trust-building, and to support implementation of the recommendations of the gen- der sensitive socio economic impact assessment to address existing barriers and en- sure a future peace agreement can more equally benefit men and women in Cyprus; 5.
لغة:العربية
نتيجة: 837252.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...f/get?open&DS=S/2021/96&Lang=A
مصدر البيانات: ods
REPORT OF THE GREEN CLIMATE FUND TO THE CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES. NOTE BY THE SECRETARIAT
Maximizing engagement with the private sector 25 8.1 Establishment of pilot programmes 26 8.2 Development of a private sector strategy 26 IX. (...) To date, 47 entities have completed this process and have been able to fully operationalize their engagement with GCF. Of these 88 entities, 57 per cent are DAEs and 43 per cent are international access entities. (...) Key expected outcomes of readiness support provided include: (a) The development of country programmes that form the basis for countries’ engagement with GCF, and development of project and programme pipelines.
لغة:العربية
نتيجة: 836754.7 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...?open&DS=FCCC/CP/2019/3&Lang=A
مصدر البيانات: ods
REPORT OF THE GREEN CLIMATE FUND TO THE CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES. NOTE BY THE SECRETARIAT
Facilitating an increase in the number of direct access proposals in the GCF pipeline 31 6.1 Current engagement with accredited direct access entities 32 6.2 Further efforts to increase the amount of direct access proposals in the GCF pipeline 32 6.3 Expected results of funding proposals from direct access entities 33 6.4 Enhancing direct access 33 VII. (...) Actions taken by GCF pursuant to guidance received from the Conference of Parties 45 13.1 Actions taken in response to guidance from the twenty-fifth session of the Conference of the Parties and the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement at its second session 47 13.2 Overview of guidance from the Conference of the Parties from COP 24 and previous Conference of the Parties sessions, and from the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement 1, that is still relevant for action and reporting 50 13.3 Report on the implementation of arrangements between the Conference of the Parties and GCF 54 Annex I: List of members and alternate members to the Board of GCF as at 16 August 2020 57 Annex II: References to decisions taken by the Board of GCF between 1 August 2019 and 16 November 2020 61 Annex III: Report of the fourth annual meeting to enhance cooperation and coherence of engagement between GCF and the constituted bodies of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change 63 Annex IV: Status of pledges and contributions made to GCF 66 Annex V: List of countries with national designated authority and focal point designations to GCF 68 Annex VI: List of entities accredited to GCF 71 Annex VII: List of activities approved to receive funding from GCF 78 Annex VIII: Approaches taken for facilitating an increase in direct access proposals 121 Annex IX: Excerpt of financial report from audited GCF financial statements, 2019 123 Page 1 Executive summary 1. (...) The USP sets new portfolio resource allocation targets for 2020-2023, which are: i) maintaining the 50:50 balance of adaptation and mitigation funding over time while seeking to deliver portfolio-level mitigation and adaptation outcomes that exceed average IRM outcomes, ii) maintaining a minimum allocation floor of fifty per cent of adaptation funding, to be provided to developing countries that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change, including small island developing states (SIDS), least developed countries (LDCs) and African States, taking into account their urgent and immediate needs, while aiming to build on IRM outcomes and maintaining appropriate geographical balance, iii) supporting developing countries mitigation activities that contribute to respond to the urgency of action to hold the increase in global average temperature to well below 2°C and pursue efforts to limit it to 1.5°C, iv) significantly increase funding channelled through direct access entities (DAEs) relative to the IRM, v) maximize engagement with the private sector, including small-micro-and medium size enterprises, ensuring the allocation to the Private Sector Facility (PSF) exceeds twenty per cent and vi) significantly increase mobilised private sector finance at the portfolio level relative to the IRM.
لغة:العربية
نتيجة: 835549.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...?open&DS=FCCC/CP/2020/5&Lang=A
مصدر البيانات: ods
LETTER DATED 11 MARCH 2022 FROM THE PERMANENT MISSION OF SRI LANKA TO THE UNITED NATIONS OFFICE AT GENEVA ADDRESSED TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL
Notwithstanding this Resolution, Sri Lanka will continue its decades-long policy of engagement with the United Nations as well as with the international community in a spirit of cooperation and dialogue with regard to the promotion and protection of human rights. (...) The Government is maintaining vigorous engagement with civil society to obtain their insights and to harness their expertise experience and support in achieving reconciliation and development. 53. (...) At a recent meeting, civil society expertise was solicited to contribute to the process of reconciliation and implementation of the SDG 16 through engagement with the Office for National Reconciliation (ONUR) and the Steering Committee on SDG 16. 59.
لغة:العربية
نتيجة: 834645.9 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...t?open&DS=A/HRC/49/G/16&Lang=A
مصدر البيانات: ods
PROMOTION AND PROTECTION OF ALL HUMAN RIGHTS, CIVIL, POLITICAL, ECONOMIC, SOCIAL AND CULTURAL RIGHTS, INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO DEVELOPMENT :INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THE EUROPEAN NETWORK OF NATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS INSTITUTIONS : NOTE / BY THE SECRETARIAT
It supports its members through information exchange; capacity building; engagement with international and regional human rights mecha- nisms; and interventions in policy development and strategic litigation in Europe. (...) The UN Secretary General has committed to strengthening NHRIs’ engagement with UN pro- cesses. The UNSG will publish a report on the relationship between NHRIs and the UN in Sep- tember 2015, which will be presented to the General Assembly (GA) at its 70th session for con- sideration in the context of its next resolution on NHRIs. 2 The GA will have an important oppor- tunity to send out another clear indication that NHRIs are welcome to contribute in those areas of UN work that would benefit from their specific independent human rights expertise.
لغة:العربية
نتيجة: 834413.8 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...t?open&DS=A/HRC/30/NI/3&Lang=A
مصدر البيانات: ods
COOPERATION WITH THE UNITED NATIONS, ITS REPRESENTATIVES AND MECHANISMS IN THE FIELD OF HUMAN RIGHTS :REPORT OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
GE.20-12515(A)  جملس حقوق اإلنسان الدورة اخلامسة واألربعون 2020تشرين األول/أكتوبر 2 -أيلول/سبتمرب
لغة:العربية
نتيجة: 832305.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...get?open&DS=A/HRC/45/36&Lang=A
مصدر البيانات: ods
LETTER DATED 29 JULY 2019 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF ARMENIA TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
Such learning and behavioral change will be required, for instance, for the implementation of sustainable consumption and production (SDG12), gender equality (SDG5), healthcare (SDG3), energy efficiency (SDG7), and sustainable agricultural practices (SDG2). Engagement Challenge: This relates to the challenge of ensuring active and direct engagement of private busi- nesses, NGOs and citizens in the sustainable development process. Without this engagement the implementa- tion of SDGs would be hardly possible.
لغة:العربية
نتيجة: 826551.9 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...sf/get?open&DS=A/74/282&Lang=A
مصدر البيانات: ods
SPECIAL SEGMENT
The African Union has a youth engagement initiative to create 11 million jobs by 2021, while its Rural Africa Task Force focuses on developing rural areas. 22. (...) Some acknowledged that some of the more successful restoration efforts are being led by local communities and municipalities, including indigenous peoples, and that community engagement cannot ignore property rights and tenure security. (...) Achieving sustainable development at scale is a major challenge that will require all stakeholders to focus on the long-term economic sustainability of value chains and on the engagement of major businesses. In the discussions, Mr.
لغة:العربية
نتيجة: 826497.9 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...pen&DS=ICCD/COP(14)/L.9&Lang=A
مصدر البيانات: ods