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Yosra AlBakkar, the project focal point at the Division of Cooperation in the field of water and natural resources programs in SIDA and Mr. (...) Mohamed Bouaam, Head of the Water Department of the FAO Representation in Morocco, met farmers and presidents of farmers' associations and made field visits and courtesy with agricultural operators in the region. (...) Visit of the agricultural fields of Berrechid The team's visit continued to a carrot field in Jakma commune.
Language:English
Score: 778947.66 - https://www.fao.org/neareast/news/view/en/c/1401318/
Data Source: un
MET/SG/12-WP/04 REV3-15/11/14 1 Agenda Item 5: Status of implementation of the work programmes of the MET Sub-group (MET/SG), AFI OPMET Management Task Force (AFI MTF) and ATM/MET/TF as assigned by APIRG STATUS OF IMPLEMENTATION OF THE WORK PROGRAMMES OF THE MET/SG AND RELATED TASK FORCES (MTF AND ATM/MET/TF) (Presented by the Secretariat) SUMMARY In order to determine the status of implementation of the MET/SG work programme, this paper reviews:  the status of implementation of the MTF work programme,  the status of implementation of the tasks and TORs of the ATM/MET/TF;  Summary of recent and forthcoming developments to the WAFS and SADIS  air navigation deficiencies in the MET field;  the status of implementation of APIRG/19 Decisions and Conclusions related to MET; and  the status of implementation of the Meteorological Sub-Group (MET/SG) work programme. (...) The MET/SG is further informed that the Terms of Reference (TORs) and work programme of the Air Traffic Management and Meteorology Task Force (ATM/MET/TF) as indicated in Appendix B, were revised through Decision 19/20 of the APIRG/19 meeting. 1.2 Based on the reviews of the above mentioned work programmes and the updated air navigation deficiencies in the MET field, this paper reviews the status of implementation, and updates the MET/SG work programme as given in Appendix D to this paper. 2. (...) In analysing the updated list of deficiencies in the MET field, the Secretariat came to the following results: a) The deficiencies in the MET field, were identified in only 24 States visited; b) Lack of certified QMS in 23 States/24 (Angola, Burundi, Cape Verde, Chad, Cameroon, Congo, Djibouti, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Lesotho, Liberia, Mauritania, Niger, DRC, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Togo and Zambia); c) Lack of use of quality WAFS products (no SADIS station) in 5 States/24 (Djibouti, Liberia, Nigeria (Kano), Sao Tome and Principe and Sierra Leone; d) Lack of issuance of aerodrome forecasts (TAF) in 3 States/24 (Angola, Burundi and Sao Tomé and Principe; e) Lack of issuance of aerodrome warnings (AD WRND) in 4 States/24 (Djibouti (Djibouti), Guinea (Conakry), DRC (Kinshasa) and Sao Tome and Principe (Sao Tome); f) Lack of issuance of wind shear warnings and alerts (WS WRND) while experienced by aircrafts in 4 States/24 (Djibouti (Djibouti), Guinea (Conakry), DRC (Kinshasa) and Sao Tome and Principe (Sao Tome). 2.4.2 MET deficiencies collected from other sources are as follows: a) Lack of issuance of SIGMET: 6 MWOs/28 have never issued any SIGMET during AFI SIGMET Tests: (Angola (Luanda), Ethiopia (Addis Ababa), Namibia (Windhoek), Tanzania (Dar Es Salaam), Zambia (Lusaka) and Zimbabwe (Harare) – Source: 2013 SIGMET TEST report); b) AFI Meteorological Bulletins Exchange (AMBEX) scheme not fully implemented (Availability of AFI METAR and TAF at Dakar RODB during 3ird quarter of 2014): TAF – 79,51% (ESAF – 76,13% and WACAF – 82,88%), METAR – 51,66% (ESAF -48,05% and WACAF – 55,27%); source: DAKAR RODB OPMET monitoring on 30 September 2014); c) ATIS not implemented: 0/17 (Angola, Cameroon, Congo, Côte d’Ivoire, Gabon, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda, Senegal, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe); Source: AFI ANP Table AOP/1) d) Lack of implementation of HF VOLMET: 0/2 (Congo and Madagascar).
Language:English
Score: 777185.06 - https://www.icao.int/WACAF/Doc...ETSG-Work-programmes-Final.pdf
Data Source: un
Microsoft Word - AVSECFALRG3-WP29-Venezuela.doc THIRD MEETING OF THE AVIATION SECURITY AND FACILITATION REGIONAL GROUP (AVSEC/FAL/RG/3) Lima, Peru, 19 to 21 June 2013 AVSEC/FAL/RG/3 — WP/29 18/06/13 Agenda Item 4: Aviation Security (AVSEC) 4.2 Report on Communications / Information Exchange Project MECHANISM OF COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATION EXCHANGE BETWEEN AVSEC / FAL / RG AND OTHER SIMILAR INTERNATIONAL GROUPS (Presented by the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela) SUMMARY This working paper presents a proposal for the creation of mechanisms for communication and exchange of information between the Aviation Security and Facilitation Regional (AVSEC / FAL / RG) and other internationally related groups, in order to contribute to the unification efforts and criteria as well as to avoid duplication of tasks, which allow better targeting of resources and efforts of working groups on aspects of civil aviation security and facilitation. (...) An example of the realization of this is the creation of the Aviation Security and Facilitation Regional Group (AVSEC / FAL / RG) for North America, Central America, Caribbean and South America (NAM / CAR / SAM) and the Latin American Civil Aviation Commission (LACAC). 1.2 Examples of these specialized working groups in the field of aviation security and facilitation worldwide, can be found at: AVSEC/FAL/RG/3 — WP/29 — 2 — a) Implementation Group (Task Forces) of the Security Forum and Facilitation of the European Civil Aviation Commission (ECAC); b) AVSEC Committee of the European Commission; c) ICAO AVSEC Panel, among others. 1.3 Each group was designed for different purposes and goals, however, we may note that they all have common activities, such as the design procedures and working methods designed to efficiently meet the standards and recommended practices of ICAO in Annex 17 to the Chicago Convention. (...) Mechanisms for communication and exchange of information between the AVSEC/FAL/RG and other related groups internationally 2.1 In order to promote the exchange of information between the AVSEC / FAL / RG and different groups and committees on aviation security and facilitation that are working internationally, it is important to design mechanisms that allow timely communication, efficiently and safely between these groups, in order to: a) Share experiences on those topics on which a group has developed procedures, protocols, standards, surveys, etc., that allow other groups learn from these experiences, in order to improve the implementation of safety measures in their regions; b) Consider the experiences of other groups that can feed or resize, projects already started or even decide not to continue the work assigned, taking into account the results obtained in other regions or AVSEC / FAL working groups; c) Identify AVSEC / FAL trends observed internationally, and d) Use more efficiently the resources and efforts for each workgroup. 2.2 A mechanism for communication and exchange of information between the AVSEC / FAL / RG and different working groups or AVSEC and FAL committees, tentatively should consider issues such as: a) initial inventory and periodic updating of the groups, committees or work teams that currently form part of duly recognized international organizations with common interests in the field of aviation security and facilitation; b) Designation of an authority and / or representative who meets the official contact between the AVSEC / FAL / RG and different groups or AVSEC / FAL committees; AVSEC/FAL/RG/2 — WP/29 — 3 — c) Establish protocols for communication and exchange of information that considers aspects of confidentiality, ease and timely provision of such information between the committees; d) Inclusion on the work agendas of committees, a summary of efforts, achievements and experiences of other similar AVSEC / FAL organizations, and e) Design history files to enable new committee members to identify the evolution of events and design working projects to prevent recurrence in subjects already covered, or use these historical data as a basis for new plans. 3.
Language:English
Score: 776660.5 - https://www.icao.int/SAM/Docum...AVSECFALRG3-WP29-Venezuela.pdf
Data Source: un
Fostering cultural exchange and intercultural dialogue Intercultural dialogue is at the heart of many policies cited in VNRs, particularly among Arab States, including Qatar ’s International Cooperation and Partnership Programme aiming for greater regional and global cultural exchange and dialogue fostering among civilizations, Morocco ’s promotion of the creative economy and artistic mobility between countries or Oman ’s National Youth Commission Cooperation that grants scholarships for research in the field of oral, cultural and intangible heritage. The United Arab Emirates ' particularly highlights its hosting of Expo 2020 for the construction of effective partnerships among countries in the field of innovation and culture. New Zealand focuses on regional Pacific identity through languages and cultures, citing “talanoa” (inclusive dialogue with indigenous people) for exchange and cooperation. (...) Youth exchanges also feature in Belgium ’s VNR that cites intercultural exchanges between Brussels’ secondary school pupils and their counterparts in Morocco , as well as university students exchanges with the Democratic Republic of Congo and China .
Language:English
Score: 775799.95 - https://en.unesco.org/news/culture-2030-agenda-12
Data Source: un
Printing - Delimitation Treaties InfoBase page 1| Delimitation Treaties Infobase | accessed on 18/03/2002 DOALOS/OLA - UNITED NATIONS Agreement between the Government of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland relating to the exploitation of single geological structures extending across the dividing line on the continental shelf under the North Sea, 6 October 1965 The Government of the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; Having reached agreement on the delimitation of the continental shelf under the North Sea between the two countries; Desiring to regulate certain matters of common interest with regard to the exploitation of single geological structures extending across the dividing line; Have agreed as follows: Article 1 If any single geological mineral oil or natural gas structure or field extends across the dividing line and the part of such structure or field which is situated on one side of the dividing line is exploitable, wholly or in part, from the other side of the dividing line, the Contracting Parties will seek to reach agreement as to the manner in which the structure or field shall be most effectively exploited and the manner in which the costs and proceeds relating thereto shall be apportioned, after having invited the licensees concerned, if any, to submit agreed proposals to this effect. Article 2 Where a structure or field referred to in article 1 of this Agreement is such that failure to reach agreement between the Contracting Parties would prevent maximum ultimate recovery of the deposit or lead to unnecessary competitive drilling, then any question upon which the Contracting Parties are unable to agree concerning the manner in which the structure or field shall be exploited or concerning the manner in which the costs and proceeds relating thereto shall be apportioned, shall, at the request of either Contracting Party, be referred to a single Arbitrator to be jointly appointed by the Contracting Parties. (...) Instruments of ratification shall be exchanged at The Hague as soon as possible. (2) This Agreement shall enter into force on the date of the exchange of instruments of ratification. (3) Either Contracting Party may terminate this Agreement by giving to the other at least twelve months' notice in writing. (4) If at the time of the termination of this Agreement a reference to an Arbitrator has been made in accordance with article 2 of this Agreement, the arbitration shall be completed in accordance with the provisions of this Agreement or of any other Agreement which the Contracting Parties may have agreed to substitute therefor.
Language:English
Score: 775772.75 - https://www.un.org/Depts/los/L...LES/TREATIES/NLD-GBR1965GS.PDF
Data Source: un
Conclusions and recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Annex Recommendations on practical confidence-building measures in the field of conventional weapons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 A/72/42 4/14 17-06819 I. (...) At its 13th meeting, on 21 April, the Working Group considered and adopted by consensus its report on agenda item 5 and a text entitled “Recommendations on practical confidence-building measures in the field of conventional weapons” (A/CN.10/2017/WG.II/CRP.1). 7. (...) These may include, inter alia: – The reciprocal appointment of points of contact and the establishment of agreed common channel between the points of contact; – The periodic exchange of relevant and agreed information and notifications; 4.2 Taking into account national security considerations, Member States are encouraged to consider making use of existing United Nations, and other regional and subregional mechanisms on transparency and information exchange in the field of conventional weapons; 4.3 Member States are encouraged, as appropriate, and on a voluntary basis, to exchange information on confidence-building measures in the field of conventional weapons at the bilateral, subregional, regional and international levels, and also to draw lessons learned from other mechanisms; 4.4 Member States should implement fully the Programme of Action to Prevent, Combat and Eradicate the Illicit Trade in Small Arms and Light Weapons in All Its Aspects and the International Instrument to Enable States to Identify and Trace, in a Timely and Reliable Manner, Illicit Small Arms and Light Weapons, as this can also contribute to confidence-building measures in the field of conventional weapons; 4.5 Member States are encouraged to continue their effor ts aimed at preventing, combating and eradicating the diversion of conventional weapons into the illicit market or to criminals, illegal armed groups, terrorists or other unauthorized recipients, including through the fulfilment of their obligations in thi s regard under the treaties to which they are parties; 4.6 Member States in a position to do so, are encouraged, to enhance cooperation and provide, upon request, assistance, including technical and financial assistance, also through establishment of possible funding arrangements, in the areas contributing to confidence-building measures in the field of conventional weapons, including reporting, sharing best practices, organizing meetings, capacity - building, training, and sponsorship programmes; 4.7 Relevant bodies of the United Nations, relevant subregional and regional organizations are encouraged to promote, in accordance with their respective mandates, practical confidence-building measures in the field of conventional weapons and to support, upon request, the efforts of Member States in carrying them out; 4.8 Non-governmental organizations as well as research and educational institutions are encouraged to promote studies and research on confidence -building measures in the field of conventional weapons; A/72/42 14/14 17-06819 4.9 Member States in a position to do so are encouraged, as appropriate, to consider organizing or supporting the organization of seminars and workshops with the aim of promoting transparency and dialogue, and raising awareness on confidence-building measures in the field of conventional weapons, including these recommendations; 4.10 Member States are encouraged to consider promoting dialogue, as appropriate, and on the basis of mutually agreed parameters, on strategies and policies governing the use, deployment, control as well as trade and transfer of conventional weapons; 4.11 Member States are encouraged to consider carrying out, as appropriate, and on a voluntary basis, practical measures to enhance confidence in their troop movements that may include, inter alia, advance notification of major military manoeuvres and voluntary invitation of observers to major military exercises, as defined by the States concerned; 4.12 Member States are encouraged to consider carrying out, as appropriate, and on a voluntary basis, military constraint measures that may include, inter alia: – Mutually agreed restrictions on the number and scope of major military exercises and movement along the border region; – Mutually agreed limitations of troop movements; – The establishment of demilitarized zones. 5.
Language:English
Score: 774590.8 - https://www.un.org/disarmament...nt/uploads/2017/06/A-72-42.pdf
Data Source: un
Fourthly, to strengthen the international exchanges and cooperation in the ICT field. Reform and opening up has been the fundamental state policy of China, whereupon China, in the principles of equality and mutual benefits, would like to increase the exchanges and cooperation with the other countries in the fields of ICTs, services, policies, standards and talents, aiming at the prosperous growth of all involved.   (...) The Chinese government is willing to increase the exchanges and cooperation with the ITU and its member countries and support the ITU for the sustained ICT development in the world.   (...) The ITU PP-10 serves as a good opportunity for exchanges and cooperation among its members. Let’s take it and make our positive contributions to the building of an inclusive information society where the ICTs can bring benefits to all the countries and their citizens as well.  
Language:English
Score: 773826.95 - https://www.itu.int/plenipoten...10/statements/china/lihua.html
Data Source: un
This means our program of activities is very varied and yet centers on different aspects of the intercultural field. At the heart of our members’ concerns, is how to serve their clients best by staying abreast of best practices and latest research in the field of intercultural communication and management. (...) After a rapid evaluation of the number of individuals working in the field of intercultural communication and management in Switzerland, we decided to set up as a national Association. (...) Intercultural trainers can now benefit from research from the field of neuroscience which looks at how our brain reacts when faced with cultural dilemma we are not ‘ wired’ to deal with.
Language:English
Score: 773615.2 - https://en.unesco.org/interculturaldialogue/node/553
Data Source: un
This means our program of activities is very varied and yet centers on different aspects of the intercultural field. At the heart of our members’ concerns, is how to serve their clients best by staying abreast of best practices and latest research in the field of intercultural communication and management. (...) After a rapid evaluation of the number of individuals working in the field of intercultural communication and management in Switzerland, we decided to set up as a national Association. (...) Intercultural trainers can now benefit from research from the field of neuroscience which looks at how our brain reacts when faced with cultural dilemma we are not ‘ wired’ to deal with.
Language:English
Score: 773615.2 - https://en.unesco.org/interculturaldialogue/blog/553
Data Source: un
At the budget rate of exchange for the period of 1.53 Swiss francs to the US dollar, the income budget amounted to 715,229,100 Swiss francs. (...) The excess of income over expenditure for the biennium 2000-01, at the budget rate of exchange, thus amounted to US$288,905; revalued at the rate of exchange in effect at the close of the financial period, the excess of income over expenditure amounted to US$267,893. 5. (...) Status of operational budget expenditure for 2000–01 (in US dollars) Title Budget Expenditure Policy-making organs International Labour Conference 9,602,562 8,850,724 Governing Body 2,026,458 1,966,942 Major regional meetings 558,700 497,494 Legal services 2,522,832 2,110,390 Relations, meetings and document services 46,186,119 44,122,704 Strategic objectives Technical programmes Standards and fundamental principles and rights at work 25,406,270 28,976,635 Employment 36,663,425 40,672,925 Social protection 25,441,132 27,303,041 Social dialogue 39,954,293 39,175,514 Gender equality 2,026,622 1,974,721 Statistics 6,756,756 6,601,788 International Institute for Labour Studies 4,931,020 5,227,090 International Training Centre of the ILO, Turin 5,340,000 5,340,000 External relations and partnerships 4,515,784 4,541,084 International policy group 1,246,414 1,324,159 Communications 5,599,375 5,480,933 Regions and technical cooperation Development cooperation 3,057,272 2,956,354 Field programmes in Africa 40,073,294 38,093,618 Field programmes in the Americas 36,680,263 34,135,365 Field programmes in Arab States 8,129,430 8,471,963 Field programmes in Asia and the Pacific 37,960,606 33,389,954 Field programmes in Europe and Central Asia 12,380,652 12,658,395 Support Services Library and information services 7,397,379 7,108,777 Information technology and communications 11,625,682 11,408,966 Internal administration 31,150,832 31,012,307 Publications 5,392,002 5,700,731 Management services General management 6,339,726 6,117,323 Human resources development 15,002,862 16,031,071 Financial services 11,554,805 10,969,759 Programming and management 4,796,756 4,552,076 Other budgetary provisions 20,243,879 19,822,197 Adjustment for staff turnover -3,968,202 Total Part I 466,595,000 466,595,000 Unforeseen expenditure 875,000 574,198 Working Capital Fund TOTAL 467,470,000 467,169,198 PART I — ORDINARY BUDGET PART II — UNFORESEEN EXPENDITURE PART III — WORKING CAPITAL FUND GB.283/PFA/1 8 GB283-PFA-1-2002-01-0199-1-EN.Doc Table 4.
Language:English
Score: 772949.3 - www.ilo.org/public/engl...lm/gb/docs/gb283/pdf/pfa-1.pdf
Data Source: un