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Physical violence The percentage of women (over the total number of women) who have experienced physical violence during the last year. (...) Sexual violence The percentage of women (over the total number of women) who have experienced rape/sexual assault during the last year. (...) The percentage of women (over the total number of women) who have experienced rape/sexual assault during life-time. This indicator should be disaggregated further by perpetrator (intimate/other relative/other known person/stranger/state authority); and frequency (one/few/many time(s) Intimate partner violence The percentage of women (over the total number of women who have ever had an intimate partner) who have experienced physical or sexual violence by current or former partner during the last year.
Language:English
Score: 558038.5 - https://www.un.org/womenwatch/...rs/Issues%20paperVAW_final.pdf
Data Source: un
Insofar as specialised violence surveys focus on violence experienced by the respondent, they do not capture homicide as a form of violence against women. (...) Police officers should be sensitive to the trauma experienced by victims and able to deal professionally and carefully with women who have been subject to acts of violence. (...) Any set of violence against women indicators should include a quantitative indicator on the proportion of victims reporting the most recent act of violence experienced to the police. A basic measure of reporting is crucial to understanding the “dark figure” of particular forms of violence against women – the difference between police recorded rape, for example, and the level actually experienced.
Language:English
Score: 557695.07 - https://www.un.org/womenwatch/...Supporting%20Paper%20UNODC.pdf
Data Source: un
Technical assistance and training provided through regional workshops MICS methodology Child Discipline Module • Questions addressed to family relatives/mothers or primary caregivers of one randomly selected child aged 2 to 14 years old • The questionnaire asked whether any member of the household had used any of various disciplinary practices with that child during the past month • 8 violent disciplinary practices: 2 psychological (such as shouting and name calling); 6 physical (such as shaking, spanking and hitting with an implement) • 3 non-violent disciplinary practices (such as taking away privileges and explaining why something is wrong) • Assesses mother/primary caregivers’ attitude toward physical punishment Child Discipline Module in MICS and DHS surveys • MICS3 (2005-2007) 33 countries • MICS4 (2010-2012) 42 countries (47 surveys) • By including a module on Child Discipline, MICS has become the largest sources of comparable data on child disciplinary practices for the developing world • Same module used in some DHS surveys DHS (2006-2009): 5 countries (Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Egypt, Liberia) MICS4 countries with data on child discipline 4 6 7 9 3 9 4 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Eastern and Southern Africa Middle East and North Africa CEE/CIS Latin America and the Caribbean South Asia West and Central Africa East Asia and the Pacific Number of MICS4 countries with data on child discipline, by UNICEF region Results 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Bosnia and Herzegovina Kyrgyzstan Kazakhstan Montenegro Georgia Serbia Dominican Republic Armenia Ukraine Belize Fiji Solomon Islands Djibouti The former Yugoslav Republic of… Lao People's Democratic Republic Albania Azerbaijan Guyana Trinidad and Tobago Tajikistan Vanuatu Kiribati Mongolia Guinea-Bissau Sierra Leone Burkina Faso Belarus Chad Iraq Suriname Algeria Syrian Arab Republic Jamaica Swaziland Ghana Gambia Morocco Côte d'Ivoire Democratic Republic of the Congo Central African Republic Egypt Cameroon Togo Viet Nam Liberia Occupied Palestinian Territory Yemen Violent discipline is widespread in most countries Percentage of children aged 2–14 who have experienced violent discipline in the past month, 2005–2010 Non-violent methods used with almost all children 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Kazakhstan Georgia Lao Burkina Faso Cameroon Djibouti Guyana Ghana Kyrgyzstan Tajikistan Trinidad and Tobago Jamaica Macedonia Syria Gambia Algeria Central African Republic Togo Serbia Cote d'Ivoire Albania Bosnia and Herzegovina Belize Montenegro Azerbaijan Guinea-Bissau Sierra Leone Belarus Yemen Iraq Suriname Ukraine Vietnam Percentage of children aged 2–14 who have experienced any non-violent discipline in the past month, 2005–2010 Any non-violent Non-violent methods are the most common form of discipline 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Georgia Kazakhstan Lao Burkina Faso Cameroon Djibouti Guyana Ghana Jamaica Kyrgyzstan Tajikistan Trinidad and Tobago Algeria Central African Republic Gambia Macedonia Serbia Syria Togo Cote d'Ivoire Albania Azerbaijan Belize Bosnia and Herzegovina Guinea-Bissau Montenegro Sierra Leone Belarus Yemen Iraq Suriname Ukraine Vietnam Percentage of children aged 2–14 who have experienced any violent and any non-violent discipline in the past month, 2005–2006 Any violent Any non-violent Most households use both non-violent and violent disciplinary practices 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Yemen Cameroon Sierra Leone Burkina Faso Vietnam Cote d'Ivoire Ghana Algeria Syria Central African Republic Togo Jamaica Gambia Suriname Iraq Belarus Guyana Guinea-Bissau Djibouti Tajikistan Trinidad & Tobago Georgia Lao Serbia Azerbaijan Macedonia Belize Ukraine Kazakhstan Montenegro Kyrgyzstan Albania Bosnia & Herzegovina Percentage of children aged 2–14 who have experienced only non-violent discipline and both non- violent and violent discipline in the past month, 2005–2006 Only Nonviolent Any NonviolentNon-violent discipline combined with violent discipline Non-violent discipline only Shouting/yelling is the most common form of violent discipline Violent disciplinary practice Estimate Shook him/her 35 Shouted, yelled at or screamed at him/her 73 Spanked, hit or slapped him/her with bare hand 27 Hit him/her on the bottom or elsewhere on the body with something like a belt, hairbrush, stick or other hard object 4 Called him/her dumb, lazy or another name like that 22 Hit or slapped him/her on the face, head or ears 16 Hit or slapped him/her on the hand, arm or legs 20 Beat him/her up with an implement (hit over and over as hard as one could) 4 Table 7. Percentage of children aged 2–14 who experienced specific forms of violent discipline in the past month, 2005–2006 Psychological aggression and physical punishment go hand in hand 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Yemen Cameroon Sierra Leone Burkina Faso Viet Nam Côte d'Ivoire Ghana Algeria Syrian Arab Republic Central African Republic Togo Jamaica Gambia Suriname Iraq Belarus Guyana Guinea-Bissau Djibouti Tajikistan Trinidad and Tobago Georgia Lao People's Democratic Republic Serbia Azerbaijan The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia Belize Ukraine Kazakhstan Montenegro Kyrgyzstan Albania Bosnia and Herzegovina Only non-violent discipline Psychological aggression without physical punishment Physical punishment without psychological aggression Both psychological aggression and physical punishment No form of discipline listed in Child Discipline Module Risk and Protective Factors All children, regardless of their personal characteristics and family background, are at risk of violent discipline FAMILY CHARACTERISTICS Family wealth Family & primary caregiver’s education Number of household members Place of residence (urban/ rural) Living arrangement (child living with mother only, father only, both, neither) Caregiver age (under 30/ 30-39/ 40+) Marital status CHILD CHARACTERISTICS Child sex Child age Engagement in child labour CAREGIVER BEHAVIORS Non-adult care Children’s & non-children’s books Educational & play activities Risk and Protective Factors: Child characteristics Child sex • In about half of the countries surveyed (17 out of 33), there is no difference in the prevalence of violent discipline between boys and girls • In the remaining 16 countries, boys are more likely to be subject to violent disciplinary practices, but differences remain small N = 16 Males Females Weighted average 78 72 Risk and Protective Factors: Family characteristics Family Wealth N = 12 Poorest 60% Wealthiest 40% Weighted average 77 70 Definition: • Wealthiest 40 percent and poorest 60 percent • Relative not absolute wealth is measured In more than half of the countries with available data (17 out of 30), there is no difference in the prevalence of violent discipline between poorest and wealthiest children In the rest of countries (12 out of the 30), children from the poorest 60 percent of households are more likely to receive a violent discipline, but overall differences remain small Attitudes toward physical punishment The large majority of mothers/primary caregivers do not think that physical punishment is necessary 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Syria Sierra Leone Vietnam Yemen Cameroon Ghana Cote d'Ivoire Burkina Faso Jamaica Djibouti Gambia Togo Belize Guinea-Bissau Trinidad & Tobago Iraq Guyana Central African Republic Azerbaijan Lao Tajikistan Suriname Ukraine Algeria Belarus Georgia Macedonia Kazakhstan Kyrgyzstan Serbia Bosnia & Herzegovina Albania Montenegro Percentage of mothers or primary caregivers who do not think that physical punishment is necessary, by country, 2005-2006 When a mother thinks that physical punishment is necessary, her children are significantly more at risk of violent discipline 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Kazakhstan*** Lao*** Bosnia & Herzegovina*** Azerbaijan*** Kyrgyzstan*** Trinidad & Tobago*** Albania*** Burkina Faso*** Ukraine*** Vietnam*** Ghana*** Suriname*** Belarus*** Guyana*** Belize*** Gambia*** Djibouti*** Sierra Leone*** Tajikistan*** Togo*** Serbia*** Montenegro*** Jamaica*** Central African Republic*** Iraq*** Cote d'Ivoire*** Cameroon*** Georgia*** Guinea-Bissau*** Yemen*** Algeria*** Syria*** Percentage of children aged 2–14 who experienced physical punishment in the past month according to the mother’s or primary caregiver’s belief in the need for physical punishment, by country, 2005–2006 No YesMother/caregiver does not think that physical punishment is necessary Mother/caregiver thinks that physical punishment is necessary Implications • Violent disciplinary practices are widespread • When the mother thinks that physical punishment is necessary, her children are significantly more at risk of violent discipline • This means that changing attitudes is important • However, the findings also suggest that among children whose mothers do not think physical punishment is necessary, a large proportion are still experiencing it • This suggests that changing attitudes may not always be sufficient to prevent physical punishment, as many children of mothers/caregivers who do not think it is necessary are still subject to it Thank you ccappa@unicef.org
Language:English
Score: 556759.38 - https://violenceagainstchildre...iplinary_practices_at_home.pdf
Data Source: un
In the Gaza Strip, white flour, chickpeas, vegetable oil, and potato prices slightly increased compared to July. Lentils price experienced an increase of 12.09% compared to July. In the Gaza Strip, tomato prices experienced a sharp increase of 154.04% compared to the previous month, and an increase of 272.17% compared to August 2020 and reached NIS 4.17. (...) In the Gaza Strip, Food CPI experienced a sharp increase of 8.57% in August compared to the same month in 2020 due to the price increase in most of the commodities.
Language:English
Score: 556187.6 - https://www.un.org/unispal/wp-.../WFPMOMARKDASHAUG21_111021.pdf
Data Source: un
In the West Bank, in July white flour, lentils, chickpeas, vegetable oil, and tomato prices experienced a slight decrease, while potato prices stayed at the same level compared to June. In the Gaza Strip, white flour, lentils, and chickpeas prices decreased compared to June, while vegetable oil and potato prices experienced a slight increase. Local white flour experienced a 9.73% increase compared to July 2020.Also, In the Gaza Strip Tomato prices experienced a sharp increase of 51.85% and reached NIS 1.64 compared to NIS 1.08 in June.
Language:English
Score: 556187.6 - https://www.un.org/unispal/wp-...WFPJULYDASHBDJULY21_150921.pdf
Data Source: un
Among key results of the survey: 73% of women journalists who responded had experienced online violence in the course of their work. 25% had received threats of physical violence, while 18% of them had been threated with sexual violence. 20% of women reported being attacked offline in connection with online violence they had experienced. (...) Right-click to download the images or download them all here         A UNESCO/ICFJ survey has revealed that 73% of women journalists who responded had experienced online violence in the course of their work. (...) The Youth Newsroom is a team of 15 young reporters from all corners of the world that covered the World Press Freedom Conference 2020 under the guidance of experienced journalists and editors.        Home #JournalistsToo Global Survey results Selected Resources on Safety of Women Journalists UN Resolutions and Decisions UNESCO applies a zero tolerance policy against all forms of harassment   WWW.UNESCO.ORG Disclaimer of use Access to Information Policy Privacy Policy UNESCO Name & Logo FAQ Environmental and Social Policies Protection of human rights : Procedure 104 Transparency Portal Scam alert Report fraud, abuse, misconduct © UNESCO 2021
Language:English
Score: 556187.6 - https://en.unesco.org/themes/s...rnalists/global-survey-results
Data Source: un
About 8 per cent had experienced physical abuse as a child, while 2 per cent had suffered sexual abuse. There are variations between the provinces in all these indicators; also more females than males had experienced sexual abuse, whereas somewhat more males had experienced beating/scolding and physical abuse. (...) About 1 in 10 persons with disabilities experienced problems with accessibility. This problem was more pronounced outside the home, and for many of them hotels, recreational facilities, sports facilities and banks were not accessible.
Language:English
Score: 556187.6 - https://www.unicef.org/zambia/...ational-disability-survey-2015
Data Source: un
During the early weeks of the stay-at-home order in Vermont, Niles et al. (2020) assessed food insecurity prior to and during COVID-19 and found 36% of new households with food insecurity, while also noting that individuals who had experienced a job loss had a higher odds of experiencing food insecurity. (...) Interestingly, over three quarters (79%) of the population experienced a decline in total household income during the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions, while only 5% of the households experienced an increase in their total income. (...) Employing a nationally representative data, it was discovered that more than half of the households experienced severe food insecurity irrespective of the sectoral distribution (rural or urban), while 12 per cent experienced food security.
Language:English
Score: 555291.85 - https://www.uneca.org/sites/de...ovid_19_ibukun_and_adebayo.pdf
Data Source: un
Sexual violence against girls and boys: Worldwide, around 15 million adolescent girls aged 15 to 19 have experienced forced sexual intercourse or other forced sexual acts in their lifetime. Only 1 per cent of adolescent girls who had experienced sexual violence said they reached out for professional help. In the 28 countries with data, 90 per cent of adolescent girls who had experienced forced sex, on average, said the perpetrator of the first incident was known to them.
Language:English
Score: 554777.15 - https://www.unicef.org/eca/pre...lk-millions-children-worldwide
Data Source: un
Psychological First Aid for children, adolescents and families experiencing trauma | UNICEF South Africa Skip to main content South Africa Toggle navigation Global Links Visit UNICEF Global High contrast South Africa EXPLORE UNICEF About us Become a donor Partners Work for UNICEF Contact us Avoid fraud Press Centre Donate Main navigation What we do Research and reports Stories Take action Search area has closed. (...) Search Close Search UNICEF Fulltext search Max Report Psychological First Aid for children, adolescents and families experiencing trauma A guide for first responders Jelly Beanz/2021 Highlights Children in South Africa are exposed to a lot trauma, violence, abuse and neglect.  (...) Author Edith Kriel and Marita Rademeyer – Jelly Beanz and Suzanne Clulow - CINDI Publication date October 2021 Languages English Download Download file (PDF, 6,49 MB) Related topics Child protection Psychosocial support South Africa More to explore Document Protect children and help them heal Information for parents and caregivers of children who have experienced trauma and abuse Get the document Photo Essay A life unseen – surviving as a refugee through COVID-19 Improving access to holistic services for children on the move See the story Press release 05 October 2021 65 per cent of young people with mental health related issues did not seek help – UNICEF Visit the page In other news Supporting vulnerable young women is a collective effort OpEd by Dr.
Language:English
Score: 554348.97 - https://www.unicef.org/southaf...d-families-experiencing-trauma
Data Source: un