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THE RIGHT TO PRIVACY IN THE DIGITAL AGE :REPORT OF THE UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS
In particular, remote real-time facial recognition is increasingly deployed by authorities across the globe.43 26. (...) AI tools have also been developed to allegedly deduce people’s emotional and mental state from their facial expressions and other “predictive biometrics” to decide whether they are a security threat.50 Facial emotional recognition systems operate on the premise that it is possible to automatically and systematically infer the emotional state of human beings from 40 A/74/335 and A/HRC/43/46, paras. 37–38. 41 Submission by Tech Hive Advisory Limited. (...) A/HRC/48/31 8 their facial expressions, which lacks a solid scientific basis.51 Researchers have found only a weak association of emotions with facial expressions52 and highlighted that facial expressions vary across cultures and contexts, 53 making emotion recognition susceptible to bias and misinterpretations.
Language:English
Score: 1061274.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...get?open&DS=A/HRC/48/31&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
.  Since 2016, INTERPOL has driven the development of the world’s only international database of facial images of suspects and persons of interests provided by member countries. This INTERPOL Facial Recognition System incorporates powerful facial recognition software and an algorithm that are capable of comparing thousands of images and detecting those that potentially belong to the same individual.
Language:English
Score: 1060030.4 - https://www.un.org/counterterr...s_interpol_handbook_launch.pdf
Data Source: un
RIGHT TO PRIVACY IN THE DIGITAL AGE :DRAFT RESOLUTION / ALBANIA, ARGENTINA, AUSTRIA, BELGIUM, BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA, BRAZIL, BULGARIA, CROATIA, CYPRUS, CZECHIA, DENMARK, ECUADOR, FINLAND, GERMANY, GREECE, HUNGARY, ICELAND, IRELAND, ITALY, LATVIA, LIECHTENSTEIN, LITHUANIA, LUXEMBOURG, MALTA, MEXICO, MONTENEGRO, NETHERLANDS, NORTH MACEDONIA, PERU, PORTUGAL, ROMANIA, SAN MARINO, SLOVAKIA, SLOVENIA, SWEDEN, SWITZERLAND, UKRAINE AND URUGUAY
.: Limited 4 October 2021 Original: English A/HRC/48/L.9 2 Reaffirming the human right to privacy, according to which no one shall be subjected to arbitrary or unlawful interference with his or her privacy, family, home or correspondence, and the right to the protection of the law against such interference, and recognizing that the exercise of the right to privacy is important for the realization of other human rights, including the right to freedom of expression and to hold opinions without interference, and the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association, and is one of the foundations of a democratic society, Recognizing that the right to privacy can enable the enjoyment of other rights, the free development of an individual’s personality and identity and an individual’s ability to participate in political, economic, social and cultural life, Affirms that the same rights that people have offline must also be protected online, including the right to privacy, and noting that the accelerated synchronization of online and offline spaces can affect individuals, including their right to privacy, Noting that algorithmic or automated decision-making processes online can affect the enjoyment of individuals’ rights offline, Recognizing the need to further discuss and analyse, on the basis of international human rights law, issues relating to the promotion and protection of the right to privacy in the digital age, procedural safeguards, effective domestic oversight and remedies and the impact of surveillance on the enjoyment of the right to privacy and other human rights, as well as the need to examine the principles of non-arbitrariness, lawfulness, legality, necessity and proportionality in relation to surveillance practices and to consider potential discriminatory effects, Noting that the rapid pace of technological development enables individuals all over the world to use information and communications technology, and at the same time enhances the capacity of Governments, business enterprises and individuals to undertake surveillance, interception, hacking and data collection, which may violate or abuse human rights, in particular the right to privacy, and is therefore an issue of increasing concern, Noting also that violations and abuses of the right to privacy in the digital age can affect all individuals, with particular effects on women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons, as well as persons in vulnerable situations and marginalized groups, Noting further that women and girls experience gender-specific violations and abuses of their right to privacy, both online and offline, as well as violations or abuses that have gender-specific impacts, Recognizing that the promotion and protection of, and respect for, the right to privacy are important to the prevention of violence, including sexual and gender-based violence, abuse and sexual harassment, in particular against women, children and persons with disabilities, as well as any form of discrimination, which can occur in digital and online spaces and includes cyberbullying and cyberstalking, Acknowledging that human rights must be considered in the conception, design, use, deployment and further development of new and emerging technologies, such as those that involve artificial intelligence, as they can, without appropriate safeguards impact the enjoyment of the right to privacy and other human rights, and that the risks to these rights can and should be avoided or minimized, including by taking measures to ensure a safe, transparent, accountable, secure and high-quality data infrastructure, by exercising due diligence to assess, prevent and mitigate adverse human rights impacts, and by providing effective remedies, including judicial remedies, and redress mechanisms and establishing human oversight, Recognizing that, while the use of artificial intelligence can have positive effects, it requires the processing of data, often relating to personal data, including on an individual’s behaviour, social relationships, political activities, gender, race or ethnicity, religion or belief, private preferences and identity, and including metadata, which can pose serious risks to the right to privacy, including when employed for identification, verification, tracking and mass surveillance, profiling, facial and emotional recognition, the prediction of behaviour and personal characteristics or the scoring of individuals, A/HRC/48/L.9 3 Emphasizing that privacy concerns should not be dismissed as a barrier to innovation, Noting that the use of data extraction and algorithms to target content towards online users may undermine user agency and access to information online, as well as the right to freedom of opinion and expression, Noting also the public concern with regard to the intrusiveness and impact of data- gathering practices, the related impacts and harms stemming from surveillance and the increasing use of algorithms involved in the application of artificial intelligence systems, Noting with concern that certain predictive algorithms are likely to result in discrimination when non-representative data are used, Recognizing that racially and otherwise discriminatory outcomes must be prevented in the conception, design, development, deployment and use of new and emerging digital technologies, Noting with concern reports indicating lower accuracy of facial recognition technologies with certain groups, in particular non-white individuals and women, including when non-representative training data are used, that the use of digital technologies can reproduce, reinforce and even exacerbate racial inequality, and in this context the importance of effective remedies, Acknowledging that, while metadata may provide benefits, certain types of metadata, when aggregated, can reveal personal information that can be no less sensitive than the actual content of communications and can give an insight into an individual’s behaviour, including their movements, social relationships, political activities, private preferences and identity, Recognizing the need to ensure that international human rights law is respected in the conception, design, development, deployment, evaluation and regulation of data-driven technologies and to ensure they are subject to adequate safeguards and oversight, Expressing concern that individuals often do not and/or cannot provide their free, explicit and informed consent to the collection, processing and storage of their data or to the re-use, sale or multiple re-sale of their personal data, as the collecting, processing, use, storage and sharing of personal data, including sensitive data, has increased significantly in the digital age, Noting in particular that surveillance of digital communications must be consistent with international human rights obligations and must be conducted on the basis of a legal framework, which must be publicly accessible, clear, precise, comprehensive and non- discriminatory, and that any interference with the right to privacy must not be arbitrary or unlawful, bearing in mind what is reasonable with regard to the pursuance of legitimate aims, and recalling that States that are parties to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights must take the steps necessary to adopt laws or other measures as may be necessary to give effect to the rights recognized in the Covenant, Emphasizing that unlawful or arbitrary surveillance and/or interception of communications, the unlawful or arbitrary collection of personal data or unlawful or arbitrary hacking and the unlawful or arbitrary use of biometric technologies, as highly intrusive acts, violate or abuse the right to privacy, can interfere with other human rights, including the right to freedom of expression and to hold opinions without interference, and the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association, and may contradict the tenets of a democratic society, including when undertaken extraterritorially or on a mass scale, Noting with deep concern that, in many countries, persons and organizations engaged in promoting and defending human rights and fundamental freedoms, journalists and other media workers may frequently face threats and harassment and suffer insecurity, as well as unlawful or arbitrary interference with their right to privacy, as a result of their activities, Noting with deep concern also the use of technological tools developed by the private surveillance industry by private or public actors to undertake surveillance, hacking of devices and systems, interception and disruption of communications, and data collection, interfering with the professional and private lives of individuals, including those engaged in the promotion and defence of human rights and fundamental freedoms, journalists and other media workers, in violation or abuse of their human rights, specifically the right to privacy, A/HRC/48/L.9 4 Recalling that business enterprises have a responsibility to respect human rights, as set out in the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights: Implementing the United Nations “Protect, Respect and Remedy” Framework, and that the obligation and the primary responsibility to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms lie with the State, and welcoming the work of Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the application of these principles on digital technologies, Emphasizing that, in the digital age, technical solutions to secure and to protect the confidentiality of digital communications, including measures for encryption, pseudonymization and anonymity, are important to ensure the enjoyment of human rights, in particular the rights to privacy, to freedom of opinion and expression and to freedom of peaceful assembly and association, Noting the importance of protecting and respecting the right of individuals to privacy when designing, developing or deploying technological means in response to disasters, epidemics and pandemics, especially the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, including digital exposure notification and contact tracing, Noting also that new and emerging digital technologies can contribute to fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, and recalling in this regard the importance of protecting health-related data, while noting with concern that some efforts to combat the COVID-19 pandemic have an adverse impact on the enjoyment of the right to privacy, 1. (...) Also recalls the increasing impact of new and emerging technologies, such as those developed in the fields of surveillance, artificial intelligence, automated decision- making and machine-learning and of profiling, tracking and biometrics, including facial and emotional recognition, without proper safeguards, on the enjoyment of the right to privacy and other human rights, including the right to freedom of expression and to hold opinions without interference and the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association; 4. (...) Calls upon all States: (a) To respect and protect the right to privacy, including in the context of digital communications and new and emerging digital technologies; (b) To take measures to end violations and abuses of the right to privacy and to create the conditions to prevent such violations and abuses, including by ensuring that relevant national legislation complies with their obligations under international human rights law; (c) To review, on a regular basis, their procedures, practices and legislation regarding the surveillance of communications, including mass surveillance and the interception and collection of personal data, as well as regarding the use of profiling, automated decision-making, machine learning and biometric technologies, with a view to A/HRC/48/L.9 5 upholding the right to privacy by ensuring the full and effective implementation of all their obligations under international human rights law; (d) To ensure that any measures taken to counter terrorism and violent extremism conducive to terrorism that interfere with the right to privacy are consistent with the principles of legality, necessity and proportionality and comply with their obligations under international law; (e) To ensure that biometric identification and recognition technologies, including facial recognition technologies by public and private actors do not enable arbitrary or unlawful surveillance, including of those exercising their right to freedom of peaceful assembly; (f) To develop or maintain and implement adequate legislation, with effective sanctions and remedies, that protects individuals against violations and abuses of the right to privacy, namely, through the unlawful or arbitrary collection, processing, retention or use of personal data by individuals, Governments, business enterprises or private organizations; (g) To consider adopting or reviewing legislation, regulations or policies to ensure that business enterprises fully incorporate the right to privacy and other relevant human rights into the design, development, deployment and evaluation of technologies, including artificial intelligence, and to provide individuals whose rights may have been violated or abused with access to an effective remedy, including reparation and guarantees of non-repetition; (h) To further develop or maintain in this regard preventive measures and remedies for violations and abuses regarding the right to privacy in the digital age that may affect all individuals, including where there are particular effects for women, children, persons in vulnerable situations or marginalized groups; (i) To develop, review, implement and strengthen gender-responsive policies that promote and protect the right of all individuals to privacy in the digital age; (j) To provide effective and up-to-date guidance to business enterprises on how to respect human rights, by advising on appropriate methods, including human rights due diligence, and on how to consider effectively issues of gender, vulnerability and/or marginalization; (k) To refrain from the use of surveillance technologies in a manner that is not compliant with international human rights obligations, including when used against journalists and human rights defenders, and to take specific actions to protect against violations of the right to privacy, including by regulating the sale, transfer, use and export of surveillance technologies; (l) To promote quality education and lifelong education opportunities for all to foster, inter alia, digital literacy and the technical skills required to protect effectively their privacy; (m) To ensure the availability of relevant training for judges, lawyers, prosecutors and other relevant practitioners in the justice system on the functioning of new and emerging digital technologies and their impact on human rights; (n) To refrain from requiring business enterprises to take steps that interfere with the right to privacy in an arbitrary or unlawful way, and to protect individuals from harm, including that caused by business enterprises through data collection, processing, storage and sharing and profiling, and the use of automated processes and machine learning; (o) To consider appropriate measures that would enable business enterprises to adopt adequate voluntary transparency measures with regard to requests by State authorities for access to private user data and information; (p) To develop or maintain legislation, preventive measures and remedies that address damage caused by the processing, use, sale or multiple resale or other corporate sharing of personal data without the individual’s free, explicit and informed consent; A/HRC/48/L.9 6 (q) To take appropriate measures to ensure that digital or biometric identity programmes are designed, implemented and operated with appropriate legal and technical safeguards in place and in full compliance with international human rights law; (r) To enhance efforts to combat discrimination resulting from the use of artificial intelligence systems including by exercising due diligence to assess, prevent and mitigate their adverse human rights impacts of their deployment; 7.
Language:English
Score: 1058357.8 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...et?open&DS=A/HRC/48/L.9&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
RIGHT TO PRIVACY IN THE DIGITAL AGE :DRAFT RESOLUTION / ALBANIA, ARGENTINA, AUSTRIA, BELGIUM, BOSNIA AND HERZEGOVINA, BRAZIL, BULGARIA, CHILE, CROATIA, CYPRUS, CZECHIA, DENMARK, ECUADOR, ESTONIA, FINLAND, GERMANY, GREECE, HUNGARY, ICELAND, IRELAND, ITALY, LATVIA, LIECHTENSTEIN, LITHUANIA, LUXEMBOURG, MALTA, MEXICO, MONACO, MONTENEGRO, NETHERLANDS, NORTH MACEDONIA, PERU, POLAND, PORTUGAL, ROMANIA, SAN MARINO, SLOVAKIA, SLOVENIA, SPAIN, SWEDEN, SWITZERLAND, TUNISIA, UKRAINE AND URUGUAY
.: Limited 7 October 2021 Original: English A/HRC/48/L.9/Rev.1 2 Taking note of the Secretary-General’s Road Map for Digital Cooperation, launched in June 2020, Reaffirming the human right to privacy, according to which no one shall be subjected to arbitrary or unlawful interference with his or her privacy, family, home or correspondence, and the right to the protection of the law against such interference, and recognizing that the exercise of the right to privacy is important for the realization of other human rights, including the right to freedom of expression and to hold opinions without interference, and the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association, and is one of the foundations of a democratic society, Recognizing that the right to privacy can enable the enjoyment of other rights, the free development of an individual’s personality and identity and an individual’s ability to participate in political, economic, social and cultural life, Affirms that the same rights that people have offline must also be protected online, including the right to privacy, and noting that the accelerated synchronization of online and offline spaces can affect individuals, including their right to privacy, Noting that algorithmic or automated decision-making processes online can affect the enjoyment of individuals’ rights offline, Recognizing the need to further discuss and analyse, on the basis of international human rights law, issues relating to the promotion and protection of the right to privacy in the digital age, procedural safeguards, effective domestic oversight and remedies and the impact of surveillance on the enjoyment of the right to privacy and other human rights, as well as the need to examine the principles of non-arbitrariness, lawfulness, legality, necessity and proportionality in relation to surveillance practices and to consider potential discriminatory effects, Noting that the rapid pace of technological development enables individuals all over the world to use information and communications technology, and at the same time enhances the capacity of Governments, business enterprises and individuals to undertake surveillance, interception, hacking and data collection, which may violate or abuse human rights, in particular the right to privacy, and is therefore an issue of increasing concern, Noting also that violations and abuses of the right to privacy in the digital age can affect all individuals, with particular effects on women, children, persons with disabilities and older persons, as well as persons in vulnerable situations and marginalized groups, Noting further that women and girls experience gender-specific violations and abuses of their right to privacy, both online and offline, as well as violations or abuses that have gender-specific impacts, Recognizing that the promotion and protection of, and respect for, the right to privacy are important to the prevention of violence, including sexual and gender-based violence, abuse and sexual harassment, in particular against women, children and persons with disabilities, as well as any form of discrimination, which can occur in digital and online spaces and includes cyberbullying and cyberstalking, Acknowledging that human rights must be considered in the conception, design, use, deployment and further development of new and emerging technologies, such as those that involve artificial intelligence, as they can, without appropriate safeguards impact the enjoyment of the right to privacy and other human rights, and that the risks to these rights can and should be avoided or minimized, including by taking measures to ensure a safe, transparent, accountable, secure and high-quality data infrastructure, by exercising due diligence to assess, prevent and mitigate adverse human rights impacts, and by providing effective remedies, including judicial remedies, and redress mechanisms and establishing human oversight, Recognizing that, despite its positive effects, the use of artificial intelligence that requires the processing of large amounts of data, often relating to personal data, including on an individual’s behaviour, social relationships, private preferences and identity, can pose serious risks to the right to privacy, in particular when employed for identification, tracking, profiling, facial recognition, behavioural prediction or the scoring of individuals, A/HRC/48/L.9/Rev.1 3 Emphasizing that privacy concerns should not be dismissed as a barrier to innovation, Noting that the use of data extraction and algorithms to target content towards online users may undermine user agency and access to information online, as well as the right to freedom of opinion and expression, Noting also the public concern with regard to the intrusiveness and impact of data- gathering practices, the related impacts and harms stemming from surveillance and the increasing use of algorithms involved in the application of artificial intelligence systems, Noting with concern that certain predictive algorithms are likely to result in discrimination when non-representative data are used, Recognizing that racially and otherwise discriminatory outcomes must be prevented in the conception, design, development, deployment and use of new and emerging digital technologies, Noting with concern reports indicating lower accuracy of facial recognition technologies with certain groups, in particular non-white individuals and women, including when non-representative training data are used, that the use of digital technologies can reproduce, reinforce and even exacerbate racial inequality, and in this context the importance of effective remedies, Acknowledging that, while metadata may provide benefits, certain types of metadata, when aggregated, can reveal personal information that can be no less sensitive than the actual content of communications and can give an insight into an individual’s behaviour, including their movements, social relationships, political activities, private preferences and identity, Recognizing the need to ensure that international human rights law is respected in the conception, design, development, deployment, evaluation and regulation of data-driven technologies and to ensure they are subject to adequate safeguards and oversight, Expressing concern that individuals often do not and/or cannot provide their free, explicit and informed consent to the collection, processing and storage of their data or to the re-use, sale or multiple re-sale of their personal data, as the collecting, processing, use, storage and sharing of personal data, including sensitive data, has increased significantly in the digital age, Noting in particular that surveillance of digital communications must be consistent with international human rights obligations and must be conducted on the basis of a legal framework, which must be publicly accessible, clear, precise, comprehensive and non- discriminatory, and that any interference with the right to privacy must not be arbitrary or unlawful, bearing in mind what is reasonable with regard to the pursuance of legitimate aims, and recalling that States that are parties to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights must take the steps necessary to adopt laws or other measures as may be necessary to give effect to the rights recognized in the Covenant, Emphasizing that unlawful or arbitrary surveillance and/or interception of communications, the unlawful or arbitrary collection of personal data or unlawful or arbitrary hacking and the unlawful or arbitrary use of biometric technologies, as highly intrusive acts, violate or abuse the right to privacy, can interfere with other human rights, including the right to freedom of expression and to hold opinions without interference, and the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association, and may contradict the tenets of a democratic society, including when undertaken extraterritorially or on a mass scale, Noting with deep concern that, in many countries, persons and organizations engaged in promoting and defending human rights and fundamental freedoms, journalists and other media workers may frequently face threats and harassment and suffer insecurity, as well as unlawful or arbitrary interference with their right to privacy, as a result of their activities, Noting with deep concern also the use of technological tools developed by the private surveillance industry by private or public actors to undertake surveillance, hacking of devices and systems, interception and disruption of communications, and data collection, interfering with the professional and private lives of individuals, including those engaged in the promotion and defence of human rights and fundamental freedoms, journalists and other media workers, in violation or abuse of their human rights, specifically the right to privacy, A/HRC/48/L.9/Rev.1 4 Recalling that business enterprises have a responsibility to respect human rights, as set out in the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights: Implementing the United Nations “Protect, Respect and Remedy” Framework, and that the obligation and the primary responsibility to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms lie with the State, and welcoming the work of Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights on the application of these principles on digital technologies, Emphasizing that, in the digital age, technical solutions to secure and to protect the confidentiality of digital communications, including measures for encryption, pseudonymization and anonymity, are important to ensure the enjoyment of human rights, in particular the rights to privacy, to freedom of opinion and expression and to freedom of peaceful assembly and association, Noting the importance of protecting and respecting the right of individuals to privacy when designing, developing or deploying technological means in response to disasters, epidemics and pandemics, especially the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, including digital exposure notification and contact tracing, Noting also that new and emerging digital technologies can contribute to fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, and recalling in this regard the importance of protecting health-related data, while noting with concern that some efforts to combat the COVID-19 pandemic have an adverse impact on the enjoyment of the right to privacy, 1. (...) Also recalls the increasing impact of new and emerging technologies, such as those developed in the fields of surveillance, artificial intelligence, automated decision- making and machine-learning and of profiling, tracking and biometrics, including facial and emotional recognition, without proper safeguards, on the enjoyment of the right to privacy and other human rights, including the right to freedom of expression and to hold opinions without interference and the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association; 4. (...) Calls upon all States: (a) To respect and protect the right to privacy, including in the context of digital communications and new and emerging digital technologies; (b) To take measures to end violations and abuses of the right to privacy and to create the conditions to prevent such violations and abuses, including by ensuring that relevant national legislation complies with their obligations under international human rights law; (c) To review, on a regular basis, their procedures, practices and legislation regarding the surveillance of communications, including mass surveillance and the interception and collection of personal data, as well as regarding the use of profiling, automated decision-making, machine learning and biometric technologies, with a view to A/HRC/48/L.9/Rev.1 5 upholding the right to privacy by ensuring the full and effective implementation of all their obligations under international human rights law; (d) To ensure that any measures taken to counter terrorism and violent extremism conducive to terrorism that interfere with the right to privacy are consistent with the principles of legality, necessity and proportionality and comply with their obligations under international law; (e) To ensure that biometric identification and recognition technologies, including facial recognition technologies by public and private actors do not enable arbitrary or unlawful surveillance, including of those exercising their right to freedom of peaceful assembly; (f) To develop or maintain and implement adequate legislation, with effective sanctions and remedies, that protects individuals against violations and abuses of the right to privacy, namely, through the unlawful or arbitrary collection, processing, retention or use of personal data by individuals, Governments, business enterprises or private organizations; (g) To consider adopting or reviewing legislation, regulations or policies to ensure that business enterprises fully incorporate the right to privacy and other relevant human rights into the design, development, deployment and evaluation of technologies, including artificial intelligence, and to provide individuals whose rights may have been violated or abused with access to an effective remedy, including reparation and guarantees of non-repetition; (h) To further develop or maintain in this regard preventive measures and remedies for violations and abuses regarding the right to privacy in the digital age that may affect all individuals, including where there are particular effects for women, children, persons in vulnerable situations or marginalized groups; (i) To develop, review, implement and strengthen gender-responsive policies that promote and protect the right of all individuals to privacy in the digital age; (j) To provide effective and up-to-date guidance to business enterprises on how to respect human rights, by advising on appropriate methods, including human rights due diligence, and on how to consider effectively issues of gender, vulnerability and/or marginalization; (k) To refrain from the use of surveillance technologies in a manner that is not compliant with international human rights obligations, including when used against journalists and human rights defenders, and to take specific actions to protect against violations of the right to privacy, including by regulating the sale, transfer, use and export of surveillance technologies; (l) To promote quality education and lifelong education opportunities for all to foster, inter alia, digital literacy and the technical skills required to protect effectively their privacy; (m) To ensure the availability of relevant training for judges, lawyers, prosecutors and other relevant practitioners in the justice system on the functioning of new and emerging digital technologies and their impact on human rights; (n) To refrain from requiring business enterprises to take steps that interfere with the right to privacy in an arbitrary or unlawful way, and to protect individuals from harm, including that caused by business enterprises through data collection, processing, storage and sharing and profiling, and the use of automated processes and machine learning; (o) To consider appropriate measures that would enable business enterprises to adopt adequate voluntary transparency measures with regard to requests by State authorities for access to private user data and information; (p) To develop or maintain legislation, preventive measures and remedies that address damage caused by the processing, use, sale or multiple resale or other corporate sharing of personal data without the individual’s free, explicit and informed consent; A/HRC/48/L.9/Rev.1 6 (q) To take appropriate measures to ensure that digital or biometric identity programmes are designed, implemented and operated with appropriate legal and technical safeguards in place and in full compliance with international human rights law; (r) To enhance efforts to combat discrimination resulting from the use of artificial intelligence systems including by exercising due diligence to assess, prevent and mitigate their adverse human rights impacts of their deployment; 7.
Language:English
Score: 1058357.8 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...n&DS=A/HRC/48/L.9/REV.1&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
RIGHTS OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES - REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON THE RIGHTS OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
The algorithm searches for characteristics such as emotional stability, extroversion, impulsivity or attention span in interview data. It may also measure facial expressions for the levels of eye contact and vocal enthusiasm of the interviewee. Artificial intelligence tools are often unable to, or improperly, read the facial expressions of persons with disabilities. That can lead to their exclusion as candidates.
Language:English
Score: 1058296.1 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...get?open&DS=A/HRC/49/52&Lang=E
Data Source: ods
Girls Vocational Initiative | United Nations Skip to main content Toggle navigation Welcome to the United Nations العربية 中文 English Français हिन्दी Português Русский Español Kiswahili Civil Society Toggle navigation Home About us » History Useful Links Events » Briefings Chat Series Conference » 68th UN Civil Society Conference 67th UN DPI/NGO Conference NGO Dialogues 66th DPI/NGO Conference Association » Application Biennial Review List of DGC-Associated CSOs NGLS » Our Story Action Stories Coronavirus (COVID-19) » Civil Society Response to COVID-19 Stakeholder Opportunities Supported by NGLS Survey on Misinformation about COVID-19 Youth & COVID-19 Youth » Youth Representatives Steering Committee YOUth News Youth Events Resource Centre » Civil Society Resource Centre Conference Room Subscribe Civil Society Gender Equality Stories Girls Vocational Initiative Where : Paynesville City, Liberia  Area of Work : Education, Gender Equality & Women's Empowerment in the context of COVID-19    Girls Vocational Initiative is a not-for-profit organization that focuses on providing vocational skills training for young women and girls in pastry art & catering, cake decoration, handicraft, soap making, facial makeup, hairdressing, and event decoration.   (...) Over one hundred women have acquired skills in pastry art & catering, cake decoration, handicraft, soap making, facial makeup, hairdressing, and event decoration.
Language:English
Score: 1053507.1 - https://www.un.org/en/civil-so.../girls-vocational-initiative-0
Data Source: un
This is because the ePassport can be electronically validated and the biometric (facial image) on the chip can be used for facial recognition.
Language:English
Score: 1053507.1 - https://www.icao.int/Security/...ges/Why-join-the-ICAO-PKD.aspx
Data Source: un
Girls Vocational Initiative | United Nations Skip to main content Toggle navigation Welcome to the United Nations العربية 中文 English Français हिन्दी Português Русский Español Kiswahili Civil Society Toggle navigation Home About us » History Useful Links Events » Calendar 2022 Briefings Chat Series Conference » 68th UN Civil Society Conference 67th UN DPI/NGO Conference NGO Dialogues 66th DPI/NGO Conference Association » Application Biennial Review List of DGC-Associated CSOs NGLS » Our Story Action Stories Coronavirus (COVID-19) » Civil Society Response to COVID-19 Stakeholder Opportunities Supported by NGLS Survey on Misinformation about COVID-19 Youth & COVID-19 Youth » Youth Representatives Steering Committee YOUth News Youth Events Resource Centre » Civil Society Resource Centre Conference Room Subscribe Civil Society Gender Equality Stories Girls Vocational Initiative Where : Paynesville City, Liberia  Area of Work : Education, Gender Equality & Women's Empowerment in the context of COVID-19    Girls Vocational Initiative is a not-for-profit organization that focuses on providing vocational skills training for young women and girls in pastry art & catering, cake decoration, handicraft, soap making, facial makeup, hairdressing, and event decoration.   (...) Over one hundred women have acquired skills in pastry art & catering, cake decoration, handicraft, soap making, facial makeup, hairdressing, and event decoration.
Language:English
Score: 1053507.1 - https://www.un.org/en/node/135483
Data Source: un
LDS2 and mobile technology can be used; d. facial recognition on the move can help facilitation of passengers; e. movements through the entire travel continuum, secure and expedited; and f. multimodal biometrics and multi-biometrics are captured. 4. (...) Submissions are sought that cover the validation of electronically submitted photographs both in on-line and paper application processes. 1.3 Biometric capabilities: This topic covers: Latest developments in biometric capture systems that would allow for the capture of high quality facial and iris biometrics in a single pass. Multi modal biometric controls look to provide greater identity security. (...) Submissions can address border control use, airline industry application or general public viewing. 3.4 Video streaming and facial recognition on the move: This topic covers: systems or solutions that utilise streaming for facial recognition in automated border control, controlled area tracking of passengers for boarding or dis-embarking from vessels. 3.5 Multimodal biometrics capture and use.
Language:English
Score: 1052159.3 - https://www.icao.int/Security/...on%20of%20Summary%20Paper.docx
Data Source: un
NEW TRAVEL REGULATIONS FOR FOREIGN NATIONALS ENTERING JAPAN / FROM THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY-GENERAL FOR HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
The amendments in articles 1, 2 and 6 of Japan’s Immigration Control and Refugee Recognition Act provide that foreign nationals who enter Japan are required to provide fingerprints and a facial photograph at immigration control entry points. 3. (...) The immigration law of Japan was amended for the purpose of establishing a framework of preventive measures against acts of terrorism, illegal overstay and other violations, and the new law requires foreign nationals to provide personal identification information (i.e., fingerprints and a facial photograph) before they can be granted landing permission, from 20 November 2007.
Language:English
Score: 1051828.7 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...t?open&DS=ST/IC/2007/51&Lang=E
Data Source: ods