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This was either the main cause of incident or a contributing factor in fifty (50) instances. 2.9 On board discipline/procedures need to be promoted with operators as this has increasingly become a contributing factor each year3. It was either the main cause of incident or a contributing factor to in twenty three (23) instances. 2.9 The lack of coordination between ATC is becoming increased contributing factor from previous year4. (...) It was either the main cause of incident or a contributing factor to incident in eighteen (18) instances. 2.11 The Airspace organisation was either the main cause of incident or a contributing factor in twelve (12) instances. • No airway should be classified as “Class F or G airspace”. 2.12 The crew not using IFBP was either main cause of incident or contributing factor in seven (7) instances. 2.13 ATS procedures were either main cause of incident or contributing factor in six (6) instances. 2 27 instances in 2008 3 14 instances in 2008 4 15 instances in 2008 5 11 instances in 2008 ATS/AIS/SAR/SG/11-WP/32 04/03/2010 - 5 - RECOMMENDATIONS 2.14 For almost half of analyzed incidents, the contributing factor is either ATC or crew – HUMAN FACTORS.
Language:English
Score: 898697.8 - https://www.icao.int/WACAF/Doc...11%20wp%2032_aiag%20_iata_.pdf
Data Source: un
The methodology is based on a base figure. Three factors are used to determine the share of the base figure for allocation to Member States: the membership factor, the contribution factor and the population factor. (...) A minimum of two posts is attributed to each Member State. The Contribution factor (30%): considers the Member States in proportion to their contribution to the regular budget. (...) The method for calculating the quota is illustrated below: 850=Base Figure 65%, 30% and 5% =Ratio of membership, contribution and population Number of Member States= 195 (since 23/11/2011) Cn=Assessed contribution of Member state “n” to the regular budget Pn=Size of the population of Member State “n” TP= Total population of Member States "n" UNESCO HR Manual October 2017 HR Appendix 5A 2 The ratios attributed to factors in UNESCO have evolved since 1995, as shown in Table 1 below: Table 1: Evolution of the ratio of factors for the calculation of geographical quotas Factors Prior to 1995 1995 1999 2003 Membership Factor 76% 70% 65% 65% Contribution Factor 24% 30% 35% 30% Population Factor – – – 5% The quota The quota is not construed as an absolute number of posts but as a mid-point with a desirable range of 25% above and 25% below this mid-point.
Language:English
Score: 892226.1 - https://en.unesco.org/sites/de...cal_distribution_201808_en.pdf
Data Source: un
The methodology is based on a base figure. Three factors are used to determine the share of the base figure for allocation to Member States: the membership factor, the contribution factor and the population factor. (...) A minimum of two posts is attributed to each Member State. The Contribution factor (30%): considers the Member States in proportion to their contribution to the regular budget. (...) The method for calculating the quota is illustrated below: 850=Base Figure 65%, 30% and 5% =Ratio of membership, contribution and population Number of Member States= 195 (since 23/11/2011) Cn=Assessed contribution of Member state “n” to the regular budget Pn=Size of the population of Member State “n” TP= Total population of Member States "n" UNESCO HR Manual October 2017 HR Appendix 5A 2 The ratios attributed to factors in UNESCO have evolved since 1995, as shown in Table 1 below: Table 1: Evolution of the ratio of factors for the calculation of geographical quotas Factors Prior to 1995 1995 1999 2003 Membership Factor 76% 70% 65% 65% Contribution Factor 24% 30% 35% 30% Population Factor – – – 5% The quota The quota is not construed as an absolute number of posts but as a mid-point with a desirable range of 25% above and 25% below this mid-point.
Language:English
Score: 892226.1 - https://en.unesco.org/sites/de...cal_distribution_201807_en.pdf
Data Source: un
While there is no standard formula, fast-track countries share strategies in progressing across three main areas to improve women’s and children’s health: Multisector progress to address crucial health determinants Catalytic strategies to maximize health outcomes Guiding principles to align action and orient progress NEW: Country Policy Reports from 10 fast-track countries Bangladesh pdf, 3.12Mb Cambodia pdf, 4.39Mb China pdf, 2.42Mb Egypt pdf, 2.42Mb Ethiopia pdf, 2.32Mb Lao PDR pdf, 3.50Mb Nepal pdf, 2.52Mb Peru pdf, 2.86Mb Rwanda pdf, 3.23Mb Viet Nam pdf, 3.67Mb NEW: Video Many roles to play Main publications These and other publications are also available in Papers and Publications Using multistakeholder dialogues to assess policies, programmes and progress for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health (2016) pdf, 83kb Factors Contributing to Maternal and Child Mortality Reductions in 146 Low- and Middle-Income Countries between 1990 and 2010 (2016) Cross-country analysis of strategies for achieving progress towards global goals for women’s and children’s health. (2016) pdf, 343kb Using multistakeholder dialogues to assess policies, programmes and progress for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health (2016) pdf, 83kb Factors Contributing to Maternal and Child Mortality Reductions in 146 Low- and Middle-Income Countries between 1990 and 2010 (2016) 2-page summary of main findings of Success Factors studies. (2014) pdf, 1.35Mb Overview Article. (...) Accelerating progress on women’s and children’s health. (2014) pdf, 730kb Policy and programme highlights from 10 fast-track countries. (2014) pdf, 1.91Mb Factors contributing to child mortality reductions in 142 low-and middle-income countries between 1990 and 2010. (2014) pdf, 616kb Post-2015 health goals: could country-specific targets supplement global ones? (2014) Country progress towards Millennium Development Goals: Adjusting for socioeconomic factors reveals greater progress and new challenges. (2014) Country teams from ten fast-track countries (Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Egypt, Ethiopia, Lao PDR, Nepal, Peru, Rwanda and Viet Nam) have undertaken multistakeholder policy reviews of factors both within and outside the health sector that have contributed to reductions in maternal and child mortality. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Next page » Introduction Papers and publications Country Policy Reports Global press release Media Videos Blogs Study groups Meetings and consultations You are here: Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health Quick Links Key documents PMNCH vision Strategy and workplan Annual report PMNCH pamphlet Stay informed PMNCH e-blast Press centre Knowledge centre Get involved Become a member Requests for proposals Employment Share your news Contact us Keep in touch © WHO 2022
Language:English
Score: 875604.5 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/successfactors/en/
Data Source: un
While there is no standard formula, fast-track countries share strategies in progressing across three main areas to improve women’s and children’s health: Multisector progress to address crucial health determinants Catalytic strategies to maximize health outcomes Guiding principles to align action and orient progress NEW: Country Policy Reports from 10 fast-track countries Bangladesh pdf, 3.12Mb Cambodia pdf, 4.39Mb China pdf, 2.42Mb Egypt pdf, 2.42Mb Ethiopia pdf, 2.32Mb Lao PDR pdf, 3.50Mb Nepal pdf, 2.52Mb Peru pdf, 2.86Mb Rwanda pdf, 3.23Mb Viet Nam pdf, 3.67Mb NEW: Video Many roles to play Main publications These and other publications are also available in Papers and Publications Using multistakeholder dialogues to assess policies, programmes and progress for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health (2016) pdf, 83kb Factors Contributing to Maternal and Child Mortality Reductions in 146 Low- and Middle-Income Countries between 1990 and 2010 (2016) Cross-country analysis of strategies for achieving progress towards global goals for women’s and children’s health. (2016) pdf, 343kb Using multistakeholder dialogues to assess policies, programmes and progress for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health (2016) pdf, 83kb Factors Contributing to Maternal and Child Mortality Reductions in 146 Low- and Middle-Income Countries between 1990 and 2010 (2016) 2-page summary of main findings of Success Factors studies. (2014) pdf, 1.35Mb Overview Article. (...) Accelerating progress on women’s and children’s health. (2014) pdf, 730kb Policy and programme highlights from 10 fast-track countries. (2014) pdf, 1.91Mb Factors contributing to child mortality reductions in 142 low-and middle-income countries between 1990 and 2010. (2014) pdf, 616kb Post-2015 health goals: could country-specific targets supplement global ones? (2014) Country progress towards Millennium Development Goals: Adjusting for socioeconomic factors reveals greater progress and new challenges. (2014) Country teams from ten fast-track countries (Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Egypt, Ethiopia, Lao PDR, Nepal, Peru, Rwanda and Viet Nam) have undertaken multistakeholder policy reviews of factors both within and outside the health sector that have contributed to reductions in maternal and child mortality. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Next page » Introduction Papers and publications Country Policy Reports Global press release Media Videos Blogs Study groups Meetings and consultations You are here: Partnership for Maternal, Newborn & Child Health Knowledge Centre PMNCH publications Quick Links Key documents PMNCH vision Strategy and workplan Annual report PMNCH pamphlet Stay informed PMNCH e-blast Press centre Knowledge centre Get involved Become a member Requests for proposals Employment Share your news Contact us Keep in touch © WHO 2022
Language:English
Score: 872060.5 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/know...ublications/successfactors/en/
Data Source: un
1 Factors contributing to child mortality reductions in 142 low- and middle- income countries between 1990 and 2010 Running Head: Factors contributing to lower U5MR David Bishai MD, MPH, PhD,1, 5 Robert Cohen, MD, MPH1 Y. (...) Figure 2 shows one of the many specifications attributing the observed U5MR decline to the contribution of various factors. This figure must be interpreted with caution. (...) The stacked bar graphs show the percent contribution from each policy area to this decline, since 1990, if the impact of the factors had been held constant at 1990 levels.
Language:English
Score: 871078.7 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/knowledge/publications/bishai.pdf
Data Source: un
Résolutions et décisions du Conseil d'administration – 4 – R 1182 (C-2001) Eliminating the backlog in the Radiocommunication Bureau’s processing of satellite network filings The Council, considering a) that the problem of the backlog in the Radiocommunication Bureau’s processing of satellite network filings was first discussed at the Plenipotentiary Conference (Kyoto, 1994), resulting first in the adoption of Resolution 18 (Kyoto, 1994) and then in decisions at WRC‑97 that provided a partial solution to this problem; b) that Council‑98 provided additional resources to the Radiocommunication Bureau to address this problem, but the unused funds remaining at the end of the 1998‑1999 budget period could not be carried over to the 2000/2001 budget period, and this problem remains unresolved; c) that in January 2000 a correspondence group was established by the Director of the Radiocommunication Bureau to identify approaches for addressing this problem which could be considered at the World Radiocommunication Conference in 2000, but that conference adopted only a few of the approaches identified; d) that, at Council‑2000, the Director established a Software Experts Group to identify approaches for improving the software used in processing satellite network filings, but the work of that group has not yet resolved any significant portion of this problem; e) that the backlog in the Bureau’s processing of satellite network filings continues to be a very significant factor affecting administrations’ and operators’ ability to comply with the time‑frames specified in various provisions of the Radio Regulations; f) that the backlog in the Bureau’s processing of satellite filings is having an adverse impact on the Radiocommunication Bureau’s ability to continue providing other services to administrations, including those services provided to developing countries, further considering a) Resolution 74 (Minneapolis, 1998) on review and improvement of the management, functioning, and structure of the International Telecommunication Union; b) the Report to the Council submitted by the Working Group on Reform in response to Council‑99 Resolution 1132; c) the annual reports to the Council submitted by the Director of the Radiocommunication Bureau that describe the continually increasing growth of the backlog in the Bureau’s processing of satellite filings; d) the reports to the Council submitted by the Director of the Radiocommunication Bureau that respond to Resolution 74 (Minneapolis, 1998) and describe possible approaches for resolving this problem; e) the report from the Working Group on Reform, which concludes the backlog in the Bureau’s processing of satellite network filings is a critical problem of the Union, and that the elimination of this problem will require the systematic development and implementation of an action plan for addressing numerous contributing factors; f) that the factors contributing to the backlog in the Bureau’s processing of satellite filings can be divided into two categories: i) those factors which can be resolved within the existing scope of responsibility of entities within the Radiocommunication Sector (such as the Radiocommunication Bureau, the Radio Regulations Board, the study groups, the Special Committee on Regulatory and Procedural Matters, the Radiocommunication Advisory Group, the Radiocommunication Assembly, and the World Radiocommunication Conference); and ii) those factors whose resolution require action by an entity outside the Radiocommunication Sector (such as the General Secretariat, the Council, and the Plenipotentiary Conference); g) that some work is currently under way in several Radiocommunication Sector entities on individual issues related to the regulatory framework for satellite networks or the processing of satellite network filings; h) that Resolution 1170 of this Council concerning the additional appropriation for the ITU-R Sector in the 2000-2001 budget, and Resolution 1174 of this Council on the budget of the Union for 2002-2003 including appropriation covering the higher level of activity expected for the satellite network filings, resolves 1 that the appropriations referred to in further considering (h) be used to increase the resource allocation in the BR for immediate action to reduce the backlog; 2 to recommend the RRB: 2.1 to develop, as a matter of urgency, a set of Rules of Procedure, consistent with the Radio Regulations, intended to eliminate the backlog, by for example:  limiting the number of pages per network to be published and validated  using a simplified method of identification of networks to be taken into account in the coordination process  using the calculation methods specified in the Radio Regulations with respect to a given network only: a) when, at the notification stage for recording there is a continuing disagreement on coordination b) at the request of an administration in need of special assistance; 2.2 to consult administrations and where practical modify the measures proposed to take account of their comments; 2.3 to report on actions taken in application of the present Resolution to the forthcoming WRC; 3. to establish an action group of the Council known as the Satellite Backlog Action Group (SAT‑BAG), composed of delegations of Member States, to prepare and oversee a coordinated approach for treating the complex and related factors contributing to the backlog in the Bureau’s processing of satellite network filings, with the assistance of the RRB and the Bureau, and with the terms of reference given in the Annex, invites Member States, 1 to contribute to the work of the group; 2 to consult their Sector Members as appropriate, urges Member States to refrain from submitting to the Bureau satellite networks which have little likelihood of being brought into use, instructs the Director of the Radiocommunication Bureau 1 to act as Secretary of the SAT-BAG; 2 to provide it with all the information available in other entities of the ITU-R Sector, necessary for its work. Annex (to Resolution 1182) Terms of reference for the Action Group: i) Describe those factors identified as contributing to the problem of the backlog in the Bureau’s processing of satellite filings, define the respective action to be performed in addressing these factors and identify the respective entity either within or outside the Radiocommunication Sector that is competent to perform the defined actions. ii) Determine to what extent the actions defined in i) are being pursued by the responsible entities and, for those factors where no action is evident, develop and submit the necessary proposals to the competent entity urging that the needed action be initiated. iii) Develop an action plan that presents the actions underway or proposed identified in i) and ii) for resolving the respective factors. iv) Identify specific outputs included in the action plan in iii) that could be databases, human resources and funding. v) As often as required, examine progress and take any necessary actions thereupon. vi) Prepare a report to WRC-03.
Language:English
Score: 867463.9 - https://www.itu.int/council/groups/Res1182-e.doc
Data Source: un
The complex structural causes of this price spike include demand factors, such as increasing populations and ethanol and biofuel production, and supply factors, including land and water constraints and seasonality. (...) In particular, trade policies (such as export bans) and commodity speculation, have been identified as possible contributing factors to price volatility. Food price inflation is likely to hit the poor the hardest, since the share of food in their total expenditures is much higher than that of wealthier populations. (...) To what extent was 2008 an unusual year in terms of the volatility of food prices? b. What factors contributed to the rapid increase in prices towards the end of the year?
Language:English
Score: 863617.1 - https://www.wto.org/english/fo...blic_forum09_e/session02_e.doc
Data Source: un
.) • • Bibliography • [Qualinet2013] Qualinet White Paper on Definitions of Quality of Experience, Output from the fifth Qualinet meeting, Novi Sad, March 12, 2013 5Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 27 - 29 November 2017 QoE Influencing Factors • QoE Influencing Factors include the type and characteristics of the application or service, context of use, the user’s expectations with respect to the application or service and their fulfilment, the user’s cultural background, socio- economic issues, psychological profiles, emotional state of the user, and other factors whose number will likely expand with further research. 6Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 27 - 29 November 2017 QoE Assessment • QoE Assessment is the process of measuring or estimating the QoE for a set of users of an application or a service with a dedicated procedure, and considering the influencing factors (possibly controlled, measured, or simply collected and reported). (...) All assessments of QoE should be accompanied by the description of the influencing factors that are included. The assessment of QoE can be described as comprehensive when it includes many of the specific factors, for example a majority of the known factors. (...) G.1000 QoS definitions to QoE and other related concepts 9Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 27 - 29 November 2017 Conclusions • SG12 agreed to the need to update G.1000 • Insert clarifications and measures how to assume compliance in all 4 sectors • No further contribution received up to now • Contributions are solicited • SG 12 is contribution driven 10Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 27 - 29 November 2017 Any questions ?
Language:English
Score: 860269.3 - https://www.itu.int/en/ITU-T/W.../qos/201711/Documents/Pomy.pdf
Data Source: un
Bulletin of the World Health Organization Bishai D, et al. (2016). Factors Contributing to Maternal and Child Mortality Reductions in 146 Low- and Middle-Income Countries between 1990 and 2010. (...) The Lancet Bishai D, et al. (2014) pdf, 616kb Factors contributing to child mortality reductions in 142 low- and middle-income countries between 1990 and 2010. (...) Boolean, Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) Frost L, et al. (2014) pdf, 982kb A Review of the Literature on Factors Contributing to the Reductions of Maternal and Child Mortality in Low-Income and Middle-Income Countries PMNCH (2014) pdf, 385kb Guide for country multistakeholder policy reviews Options Consultancy and CEPA (2014) pdf, 1.97Mb Country-specific review of literature and data for 10 fast-track countries Cortez R., et al. (2014) Maternal and child survival : findings from five countries experience in addressing maternal and child health challenges.
Language:English
Score: 860164.5 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/successfactors/en/index1.html
Data Source: un