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; REGISTERED AS {joint-iso-itu-t ms(9) function(2) part14(14) managedObjectClass(3) 3}; loopbackTestObject MANAGED OBJECT CLASS DERIVED FROM "Rec. (...) This parameter is used to convey additional connection test information that is related to the function being tested.!;; REGISTERED AS {joint-iso-itu-t ms(9) function(2) part14(14) parameter(5) 1}; connectionUncontrolledResultsParam PARAMETER CONTEXT ACTION-REPLY ; WITH SYNTAX TestCategories-ASN1Module. (...) This parameter is used to convey connection test result information that is related to the function being tested.!;; REGISTERED AS {joint-iso-itu-t ms(9) function(2) part14(14) parameter(5) 3}; connectivityTestInfoParam PARAMETER CONTEXT ACTION-INFO ; WITH SYNTAX TestCategories-ASN1Module.
Language:English
Score: 479430 - https://www.itu.int/wftp3/Publ...fl/itu-t/x/x737/1995/x737.html
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; REGISTERED AS {joint-iso-itu-t ms(9) function(2) part14(14) managedObjectClass(3) 1}; connectivityTestObject MANAGED OBJECT CLASS DERIVED FROM "Rec. (...) ; REGISTERED AS {joint-iso-itu-t ms(9) function(2) part14(14) managedObjectClass(3) 3}; loopbackTestObject MANAGED OBJECT CLASS DERIVED FROM "Rec. (...) This parameter is used to convey additional connection test information that is related to the function being tested.!;; REGISTERED AS {joint-iso-itu-t ms(9) function(2) part14(14) parameter(5) 1}; connectionUncontrolledResultsParam PARAMETER CONTEXT ACTION-REPLY; WITH SYNTAX TestCategories-ASN1Module.ConnectionTestResults; REGISTERED AS {joint-iso-itu-t ms(9) function(2) part14(14) parameter(5) ??}
Language:English
Score: 479430 - https://www.itu.int/wftp3/Publ.../fl/itu-t/x/x737/1995/x737.gdm
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Y.2011 NGN: Horizontally Integrated Networks Far reaching implications 5 ITU-T ITU-T/OGF Workshop on Next Generation Networks and Grids Geneva, 23-24 October 2006 Single Convergence Layer Internet Protocol (IP) Any Service & Every Service Any Transport & Every Transport Technology Two Service Domains Scope Of “NGN” Services Stratum Transport Stratum 6 ITU-T ITU-T/OGF Workshop on Next Generation Networks and Grids Geneva, 23-24 October 2006 Service Provision: Mediated and non-mediated services Packet Core Network(s) Packet Access Network(s) Transport Network Interconnection Transport Network Interconnection Single/Distributed Packet Access Network(s) Application & Service Servers Application & Service Servers End User/Application System S End User/Application System S Network-based Mediated Services Non-Mediated Services Service Interconnection T T Network-based Mediated Services 7 ITU-T ITU-T/OGF Workshop on Next Generation Networks and Grids Geneva, 23-24 October 2006 Effects of Separation o Universal: • Any service over a single IP transport network o Side Effect: • Two different levels of control, authentication, admission, charging, etc. o Challenge: • Service to transport coupling & mapping for: — QoS selection — QoS control — transport resource allocation — monitoring — accounting for usage Solution: Resource & Admission Control Functions 8 ITU-T ITU-T/OGF Workshop on Next Generation Networks and Grids Geneva, 23-24 October 2006 Basic Functional View Transport stratum Service stratum Control Media M an ag em en t Fu nc tio ns Management ANI Transport Control Functions Resource and Admission Control Functions Network Attachment Control Functions NNIUNI Application Support Functions & Service Support Functions Applications Transport Functions End-User Functions Other Networks Service Control Functions Service User Profiles Transport User Profiles 9 ITU-T ITU-T/OGF Workshop on Next Generation Networks and Grids Geneva, 23-24 October 2006 Component View Legacy Terminals Legacy Terminals Transport Stratum Service Stratum End-User Functions Application Functions Core transport Functions NGN Terminals Customer Networks O ther N etw orks Application Support Functions and Service Support Functions Core Transport Functions O ther N etw orks Edge Functions Access Transport Functions Service Control Functions Network Access Attachment Functions Network Attachment Control Functions (NACF) Access Network Functions Resource and Admission Control Functions (RACF) User Profile Functions T. (...) User Profile Functions GWGW Applications 10 ITU-T ITU-T/OGF Workshop on Next Generation Networks and Grids Geneva, 23-24 October 2006 Functional Entity Model Application Scope of NGN M an ag em en t f un ct io ns T-6: Inter- connection Border Gateway FE S-6: S. (...) Authentication &Authorization FE Application Support Functions & Service Support Functions (may include own Authentication, Authorization and Accounting) IP Multimedia Networks PSTN/ISDN Core transport Access transport Service control T-13: T.
Language:English
Score: 479211 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/work...esentations/s2p1-knightson.pdf
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Dialogue with the Chairpersons of the functional commissions In the dialogue session the chairpersons and representatives of the functional commissions focused their interventions on the four key issues suggested by Mr. (...) The chairpersons of the functional commissions were all supportive of the new functions of the Council and saw great value in supporting the Annual Ministerial Review (AMR) and the Development Cooperation Forum (DCF). (...) He also highlighted that the new functions of ECOSOC could help to bring together the respective expertise of the functional commissions and ensure that each of the functional commissions would contribute to the development agenda as a whole.
Language:English
Score: 479070.36 - https://www.un.org/en/ecosoc/m...6/docs/summary%20FCs-Final.pdf
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Carrier’s Internal Functional Architecture: • The specific mechanisms, placements & physical packaging of the various S/BC functions within a carrier’s network are solely an issue internal to that carrier. • However, we agree there is value in establishing core requirements on S/BC functions in order to: 1. (...) “S/BC” is not a functional entity itself. 2. “S/BC” is really just a cooperating set of functions or functionalities distributed amongst one or more already- identified FEs (e.g., P-CSCF). 3. (...) (A functional group does not necessarily map to a single physical entity.) 4.
Language:English
Score: 478840.9 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/work...03/presentations/s5_helmes.pdf
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Approaches With expropiation:  Property rights  Functional  Process -Adequate information -Setting the value: what is compensated and how this is calculated - When Approaches 5  Property rights  Functional  Process With expropiation: Approaches  Property rights  Functional  Process - Specıfıc compensatıon? (...) With Land Banking: Approaches  Property rights  Functional  Process - Smooth transition - Less work for the Court With Land Banking: Approaches 8  Property rights  Functional  Process Questions: -Who is the owner? (...) Power balance among sectors With Land Banking: Approaches From Thomas, J. 2013 With Land Banking + Land Consolidation Approaches 9  Property rights  Functional  Process - Possibility of compensation in land AND general improvement of rural conditions (more alternatives for an agreement) With Land Banking + Land Consolidation Approaches  Property rights  Functional  Process - if comprehensive land consolidation and enough land: “all” land functions can be re- established - extensıon of compensatıon to a broader area - Especial procedure LC-CLA in Germany With Land Banking + Land Consolidation Approaches 10  Property rights  Functional  Process - Two in one: coordination and integration With Land Banking + Land Consolidation Approaches  Property rights  Functional  Process Questions: - Actual functional conflicts to be solved vs.
Language:English
Score: 478779.74 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...ents/Events2015/LN7/3.6_en.pdf
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., IP addresses of all but a few entities) as necessary o Be able to handle remote NAPT devices o Mitigate relevant denial-of-service attacks Real-time application-driven resource management that Preserves the separation of services and transport Provides the necessary coupling to guarantee QoS and implement security measures dynamically ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 4 ITU-T Brief History + Building Blocks o 1997: IETF has completed the Resource Reservation Setup Protocol (RSVP)—a generally non-scalable per-flow end-to-end mechanism, which has found a 2nd life in Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) o 2002-2005: IETF has developed the Differentiated Services (DiffServ) model, which supports traffic aggregation, and applied it to MPLS o 2000-2005: IETF has developed the Common Open Policy Service (COPS) protocol to exchange policy information between a policy server (Policy Decision Point [PDP]) and its clients (Policy Enforcement Points [PEPs]) • But other protocols (notably, RADIUS, DIAMETER, and H.248) have evolved to be used for the same purpose o 2000-present: 3GPP has adopted the IETF building blocks for Service- Based Local Policy (SBLP), which is evolving into Policy and Charging Control. 3GPP2 has a similar effort on Service-Based Bearer Control. o 2003-present: ETSI TISPAN has been developing the Resource and Admission Control SubSystem (RACS) based on SBLP o 2004-present: ITU-T Q.4/13 has been developing RACF, with an end-to- end scope from the onset, based on SBLP ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 5 ITU-T RACF and NGN Framework Architecture Other Networks Service Control Functions Transport stratum Service stratum M an ag em en t Fu n ct io n s Service User Profiles Service User Profiles Transport User Profiles Control Media Management Application/Service Functions 3rd Party Applications ANI End-User Functions Transport Control Functions Resource & Admission Control Functions Network Attachment Control Functions Network Attachment Control Functions Transport Functions NNIUNI See ITUSee ITU--T Y.NGNT Y.NGN--FRAFRA ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 6 ITU-T ITU-T RACF Architecture Policy Decision Functional Entity (PD-FE) o Authorizes resource requests o Configures the transport to enforce policy Transport Resource Control Functional Entity o Tracks resource usage & network topology o Provides resource information to PD-FE Policy Enforcement Functional Entity (PE-FE) o Enforces policy for NAPT, gating, path selection, rate limiting, packet marking, etc. Rs Rw Service Stratum Transport Functions PD-FE TRC-FE RACF Transport Stratum Service Control Functions (part of IMS or other)(part of IMS or other) Rt RdRp RcRn Ru Ri TRE-FE PE-FE Network Attachment Control Functions intra- domain inter- domain (See ITU(See ITU--T Y.RACF)T Y.RACF) O ther N G N s typically part of border transport elements (e.g., S/BCs, edge router) service independent, transport dependent, segment specific service facing, transport independent ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 7 ITU-T More RACF Specifics Support for o Relative and absolute QoS, including priority o Endpoints of varied QoS control capabilities o Push and pull models for policy installation o Multiple transaction models for resource requests o Various resource management methods based on accounting, measurement and reservation o Existing and emerging transport QoS mechanisms ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 8 ITU-T Push and Pull Models Pull Model User Equipment RACF Transport Functions Service Control Functions 1 5 4 2 6 3 Policy User Equipment RACF Transport Functions Service Control Functions 1 7 3 5 6 2 4 Token T Policy T T 8 Push Model Application Signaling RACF Control Transport QoS Signaling ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 9 ITU-T 6. (...) ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 10 ITU-T Configuration Example I Network Attachment Control Functions Ru Service Control Functions Access Network RwRw Rc Rt PD-FE Service Control Functions TRC-FE Core Network PE-FE RwRw Rc Rt PD-FE TRC-FE Rp PE-FE Rs Access Network RwRw Rc Rt PD-FE TRC-FE PE-FEPE-FEPE-FEPE-FE Network Attachment Control Functions Ru Service Control Functions Rs RiRi Customer Premises Equipmen t/Network Customer Premises Equipment /Network The PE-FE can reside in the Session Border Controller Access Node Border Gateway Cable Modem Termination System Gateway GPRS Support Node Packet Data Serving Node ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 11 ITU-T Configuration Example II Network Attachment Control Functions Ru Service Control Functions Access Network RwRw Rc Rt PD-FE Service Control Functions TRC-FE Customer Premises Equipment /Network Core Network PE-FE Rs Access Network Rw Rs Rw Rc Rt PD-FE TRC-FE PE-FEPE-FEPE-FE Network Attachment Control Functions Customer Premises Equipmen t/Network Ru • Core Network is over provisioned • RACF is deployed per network segment as needed ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 12 ITU-T Use Case: Link-Based Resource Management o LSPs are set up a priori for routing the traffic of a specific application o DiffServ is used for effecting the desired treatment of traffic o RACF Measures link utilization per service class periodically Formulates blocking policy upon link congestion for affected paths Makes admission decision per policy Configures edge routers for the admitted traffic MPLS Path MPLS/DiffServ Network Enterprise Network IP PhoneSoftclient Enterprise Network IP PhoneSoftclient Edge Router (PE-FE) Core Router PDF TRCF CSCF CSCF- Call Session Control Function Edge Router (PE-FE) CSCF ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 13 ITU-T Summary Bridging service control and transport, RACF enables dynamic application-driven resource management • Application admission decision taking into account resource availability • Preempting transport congestion from the service control layer Augmenting native transport QoS support, RACF can be applied edge-to-edge or end-to-end, and be realized in various ways All network-controlled applications can make use of RACF for performance assurance and network border control The initial Recommendation on RACF (Y.RACF) is targeted for consent in July • Selection and development of RACF protocols is ongoing • Next steps are to address open issues such as inter-PDF communication (intra- and inter-provider) and coordination of transactions end-to-end • Draft Recommendations Y.123.qos and Y.enet under development apply RACF to specific Ethernet environments Cooperation among related standards efforts across SDOs is essential for achieving a consistent approach ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 14 ITU-T List of Acronyms o CSCF: Call Session Control Function o GPRS: General Packet Radio Service o IMS: IP Multimedia Subsystem o LSP: Label Switched Path o NAPT: Network Address and Port Translation o NGN: Next Generation Networks o PD-FE: Policy Decision Functional Entity o PE-FE: Policy Enforcement Functional Entity o RACF: Resource and Admission Control Functions o RSVP: Resource ReserVation setup Protocol o S/BC: Session Border Controller o SDO: Standard Development Organization o TRC-FE: Transport Resource Control Functional Entity o TRE-FE: Transport Resource Enforcement Functional Entity Resource and Admission Control for NGN Why?
Language:English
Score: 478715.1 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/work...0606/presentations/s7p1-lu.pdf
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The investigation function had been previously reviewed by the JIU in 2000 (JIU/REP/2000/9) and 2011 (JIU/REP/2011/7). (...) A still insufficient degree of structural autonomy and operational independence of the investigation function. A lack of structural autonomy and operational independence of the investigation function results in inadequate safeguards against interference by management. (...) The investigation function is faced with new demands and particular challenges.
Language:English
Score: 478629.35 - https://www.un.org/en/ga/fifth...g_JIU_report_Inspector_JIU.pdf
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This paper will: consider the reasons given for implementing functional separation and the current remedies that are available in certain countries to address discriminatory behaviour; look at the key features of functional separation and examine case studies from countries that have implemented, or are considering implementing, functional separation; examine the arguments that are flowing around functional separation, including the common ground that exists and the major issues being debated; and consider the application of functional separation in a developing country context and look at some alternatives to implementation of functional separation. 2 MEANING OF FUNCTIONAL SEPARATION But first, it is necessary to put forward a basic definition for the term “functional separation”, sometimes also known as operational separation. (...) The timescale for implementation of functional separation can be measured in years. In New Zealand, Telecom considers it will take the best part of four years to fully roll-out functional separation. 7.2 Functional separation not likely to be reversible Once a company has gone through functional separation, it is unlikely that it will ever be able to return to its previous, fully vertically-integrated state. (...) A vertically-integrated company without functional separation is more conducive to investment than a vertically-integrated company with functional separation.
Language:English
Score: 478533.35 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-D/treg...pers/Malcolm_Webb_session3.pdf
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Key Features of ITU-T NGN 16 08.09.2005 Standardization of the NGN and ICT Services Development 5 ~ 7 July Tashkent, Uzbekistan Overall NGN Architecture Transport stratum Service stratum Media Handling Functions Access Functions Other networks Other networks Customer Functions Transport User Profile Functions Application Functions Gateway Functions Transport Control Functions Control Media NNIUNI Edge Functions Network Attachment Control Functions Core Transport functions Core Transport Functions Access Transport functions Access Transport Functions Service and Control Functions Service User Profile Functions M an ag em en t F un ct io ns Overall NGN Architecture General Functional Architecture Functional Architecture for specific instances (e.g. (...) Key Features of ITU-T NGN 17 08.09.2005 Standardization of the NGN and ICT Services Development 5 ~ 7 July Tashkent, Uzbekistan Functional Architecture Model Access Packet Transport Function Access Relay Function T.Network Access Control Function T.Network Access Process Function Mobility Support Function Transport Resource & Enforcement Function Traffic Measurement Function Media Resource Processing Function Transport Resource & Enforcement Function Traffic Measurement Function Media Resource Processing Function A-PGF T-7 T-6 T-8 T-4 T-20 T-15 T-13 T-11 T-3 T-1 T-2 T-9 T-4 T-15 T-13 T-11 Transport SGF T-12 TMGFCore Packet Transport Function Application Server Function Application Gateway Function NAAS IP address allocation Authentication Authorisation Access net. config Location mgt. S.Authentication and Authorization Function Session Control Proxy Function SGCF PGCF AGCF LS Function Registration Function User profile DB Function A-1 A-2 S-9 S-10 S-4 S-18 S-1 S-19 S-13 S-17 Terminal Function Other NGNOther NGN PSTN/ISDN other IP MM Network (e.g.
Language:English
Score: 478258.9 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/work...tions/KeynoteAddress-CSLee.pdf
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