Home

Results 41 - 50 of 213,962 for functional. Search took 5.007 seconds.  
Sort by date/Sort by relevance
Voice enhancement function tandeming is avoided, and the active functions are optimally placed according to the preference rules. (...) Voice processing functions in the end-to-end call path are still in tandem. (...) Voice enhancement function tandeming is avoided, and the active functions are optimally placed according to the preference rules.
Language:English
Score: 476869.4 - https://www.itu.int/wftp3/av-a...006-16-att1-Draft8GMDCSPNE.pdf
Data Source: un
ZZZ One-way Two-way J.148 G.OMV (Videophone) Speech/Audio and Video Speech black: telephone-band, green: for wideband, purple: for cable TV, red for multimedia ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 6 ITU-T Framework of G.OMV (overview) Video quality parameters Video quality parameters Speech delay (DS) Video delay (DV) Speech delay (DS) Video delay (DV) Video quality estimation function Video quality estimation function Speech quality estimation function Speech quality estimation function Multimedia quality integration function Multimedia quality integration function Multimedia quality (MOSMM) Speech quality parameters Speech quality parameters MOSS DS DV MOSV MOS: Mean opinion score ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 7 ITU-T Framework of G.OMV (1/3) o Assuming typical terminal characteristics o Input: 1. (...) Video frame rate o Output: MOSS, MOSV, MOSMM ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 8 ITU-T Framework of G.OMV (2/3) o Individual speech and video quality estimation functions with predetermined coefficient databases for various kinds of codecs and coding conditions such as frame rate. (...) #N = 0.999 Coefficient database ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 10 ITU-T Framework of G.OMV (3/3) o Multimedia quality integration function that takes into account 1. interaction between speech and video quality, 2. effect of delay, and 3. effect of delay synchronization ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 11 ITU-T Example of video quality estimation function Video quality parameters Video quality parameters Speech delay (DS) Video delay (DV) Speech delay (DS) Video delay (DV) Video quality estimation function Video quality estimation function Speech quality estimation function Speech quality estimation function Multimedia quality integration function Multimedia quality integration function Multimedia quality (MOSMM) Speech quality parameters Speech quality parameters MOSS DS DV MOSV R2: 0.936 RMSE: 0.210 MCI: 0.211 Codec: H.264 Experimental conditions Video codec: H.264 (Quicktime) Video format: QVGA Key frame interval: 1 s Coding bit rate: 64 – 1024 kbps Frame rate: 1 – 30 fps IP packet loss ratio: 0 - 10% Subjects: 32 non-experts 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Estimated MOS 5 5 Su bj ec ti ve M O S ITU-T Workshop on “End-to-End QoE/QoS“ Geneva, 14-16 June 2006 12 ITU-T Example of multimedia quality integration function Video quality parameters Video quality parameters Speech delay (DS) Video delay (DV) Speech delay (DS) Video delay (DV) Video quality estimation function Video quality estimation function Speech quality estimation function Speech quality estimation function Multimedia quality integration function Multimedia quality integration function Multimedia quality (MOSMM) Speech quality parameters Speech quality parameters MOSS DS DV MOSV 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 Estimated MOSMM Su bj ec ti ve M O S M M Experimental conditions Speech codec: G.722 (64 kbps, mono) Video codec: MPEG-4 (4 Mbps, VGA, 30 fps) Network performance: IP packet loss ratio: 0~10% IP packet transmission delay: 167~1200 ms Task: Free conversation Subjects: 32 non-experts Ref.: T.
Language:English
Score: 476867.9 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/work...esentations/s8p2-takahashi.pdf
Data Source: un
Management response submission 8 | UNICEF Executive Board – Informal briefing – 24 May 2022 Item 7: Annual report for 2021 on the evaluation function in UNICEF • There has been a significant increase in the implementation of actions committed to in management responses. • There is marginal variation in the pace of implementation of management response actions for evaluations completed between 2019 and 2021. • Evaluation function is commissioning a review of current management responses and their implementation and exploring other ways of enhancing evaluation use beyond the management response. (...) Evaluation function resourcing 10 | UNICEF Executive Board – Informal briefing – 24 May 2022 Item 7: Annual report for 2021 on the evaluation function in UNICEF • The evaluation function adapted to unprecedented challenges by finding new ways of working, new evaluative products to help inform the ongoing response, and new evaluation partnerships to tackle the specific areas of evaluation associated with this unprecedented health emergency. • Despite the constraints, the evaluation function continued to perform well on established performance indicators. • The plan for global evaluations, 2022–2025 contains a greatly heightened emphasis on outcome- and impact-level evidence generation, expansion of the suite of evaluative exercises to help inform the work of the organization. • More action is needed in the use of traditional evaluations versus less traditional types of evaluative exercises, organizational follow-through on evaluations. • The evaluation function will be conducting an analysis to identify any “supply-side” areas that might require improvement, as well as a synthesis to identify those areas of the organization’s operations that have not taken meaningful action in implementing management response recommendations. Conclusion 11 | UNICEF Executive Board – Informal briefing – 24 May 2022 Item 7: Annual report for 2021 on the evaluation function in UNICEF Thank you. 12 | UNICEF Executive Board – Informal briefing – 24 May 2022 Item 7: Annual report for 2021 on the evaluation function in UNICEF Slide Number 1 Slide Number 2 Slide Number 3 Slide Number 4 Slide Number 5 Slide Number 6 Slide Number 7 Slide Number 8 Slide Number 9 Slide Number 10 Slide Number 11 Slide Number 12
Language:English
Score: 476465.1 - https://www.unicef.org/executi...on-R.McCouch-EN-2022.05.17.pdf
Data Source: un
. • ICAO would maintain an inventory of competent safety oversight providers, and the tasks and functions that they provide. • RSOOs (and other safety oversight providers) would have to demonstrate competence in the tasks and functions that they provide, qualify as an ICAO recognized safety oversight provider. 3 The Solution (Cont’d) • An ICAO Recognized Safety Oversight Provider would be any international, regional or sub-regional aviation safety oversight body that carries out tasks and functions on behalf of a State or group of States. • Such safety oversight bodies could include: – civil aviation authority of a State that provides assistance to another State; – corporatized service provider that carries out safety oversight tasks and functions; and an – RSOO. 4 ICAO Recognition • Recognition would be granted in respect to the specific tasks and functions carried out by the safety oversight provider. • Each task and function would be mapped to a USOAP CMA Protocol Question (PQ) or set of PQs. • Provider’s tasks and functions would be classified in accordance with the level of empowerment granted by a State or group of States. 5 ICAO Recognition (Cont’d) • The following three levels of delegation/ empowerment are defined based on the complexity of tasks and functions performed: Level 1 – advisory, consultancy and coordinating tasks and functions. Level 2 – operational assistance tasks and functions. Level 3 – certifying agency tasks and functions. 6 ICAO Recognition (Cont’d) • For Levels 1 and 2 tasks and functions, ICAO recognition would be based on an initial assessment to evaluate the capabilities of the provider. • For a provider to receive ICAO recognition for Level 3 tasks and functions, it would have to first undergo an activity under the ICAO USOAP CMA. • For Levels 1 and 2, ICAO recognition would be renewed at a determined frequency, on the basis of a re-assessment. • For Level 3, ICAO recognition would be dependent on USOAP CMA results. 7 Level 1 – Basic advisory and consultancy assistance • A safety oversight provider may provide consultancy and advisory assistance to a State or a group of States. • No agreement is established directly between the provider and the State for the delegation of tasks and functions for regulating, certifying or supervising industry entities. • Inspectors employed by a provider (or working under a coordinated inspector sharing scheme) can carry out inspections or audits for a State’s CAA in their own individual capacity. • The State grants all required authorizations; the provider only coordinates the use of the inspector. 8 Level 2 – Operational assistance • The safety oversight provider can carry out all Level 1 activities. • The provider can also provide operational assistance to a State or group of States on the basis of a formal and binding delegation agreement. • The operational assistance may include harmonization of standards and audits, inspections and other investigations conducted on industry entities. • The State issues certificates, licences and approvals on the basis of the operational assistance provided. • These services can also include surveillance over the respective document holders. 9 Level 3 – Certifying Agency • The safety oversight provider can carry out both Level 1 and 2 activities. • In addition, under Level 3, both the conduct of the technical services and the issuance of certificates, licences and approvals are formally delegated to the provider in a legally binding manner. • The State retains responsibility under the Chicago Convention for safety oversight and for any certificates, licences and approvals issued on its behalf. • The State exercises this responsibility by monitoring a provider’s capabilities. 10 Level 3 – Certifying Agency (Cont’d) • A certifying agency must be empowered to take legally binding decisions and accept legally binding delegations from States. • Each State that has formally delegated tasks and functions to a safety oversight provider would have to provide written notification to ICAO. • The scope of the activity under the USOAP CMA would be determined by the specific tasks and functions delegated by a State or group of States, which entail the direct oversight of industry entities. 11 Level 3 – Certifying Agency (Cont’d) • An MOU established between ICAO and the safety oversight provider, would govern the conduct of all activities under the USOAP CMA. • Effective implementation (EI) of the USOAP Critical Elements (CEs) of the applicable tasks and functions would be monitored under the USOAP CMA. 12 Level 3 – Certifying Agency (Cont’d) • Failure of the safety oversight provider to maintain a satisfactory EI level with respect to delegated tasks and functions, could result in an overall low EI or even an SSC for the State concerned. • Where a group of States has formally delegated tasks and functions to a provider, failure of the provider to maintain a satisfactory EI level in any of the delegated tasks and functions could result in an overall low EI or even an SSC for all the States concerned. 13 Level 1 - Delegation/Empowerment Levels Level of Delegation Area of Activity Typical Tasks and Functions Level 1 Advisory LEG Develop a set of harmonized legislation and/or regulations for transposition into the national legislation/regulation of the State. (...) The regional aviation safety oversight body is mandated by its membership to carry out specific technical tasks and functions to include: • Carry out certification tasks and functions for all member States. • Provide direct assistance to all member in the areas of certification and surveillance States, to include the carryout of inspections required to support the issuance of certificates, licences and approvals by the States. • Establish and implement regional ramp and foreign aircraft inspection programmes • Collection and analysis of aviation safety and accident data to support the States’ SSPs. 15 Level 3 - Delegation/Empowerment Levels Level of Delegation Area of Activity Typical Tasks and Functions Level 3 Certifying Agency LEG Develop a set of common legislation and/or regulations, promulgated/adopted through a regional legislative mechanism and directly binding on States.
Language:English
Score: 476429.1 - https://www.icao.int/ESAF/EASA...5-RSOOforumICAOpptGASOS_v5.pdf
Data Source: un
REQUEST FOR EXPRESSION OF INTEREST (EOI) REQUEST FOR EXPRESSION OF INTEREST (EOI) 129336 Subject: Consultancy : Development of functionality employing the PaaS Mendix Date of this EOI: 18 August 2021 Closing date of this EOI: 03 September 2021 Reference Number: ICC ref. 129336 Address EOI for the attention of: ICC Procurement Fax no.: +31 70 515 8336 E-mail address: tender.3@icc-cpi.int It is anticipated that the International Criminal Court (ICC), will shortly be issuing a solicitation for the provision of consultancy for Consultancy : Development of functionality employing the PaaS Mendix . (...) SUMMARY Statement of Work (Range of Services) The required services are comprised but not limited to the following: · Delivery of Mendix functionality (DevOps). · Design new functionality. · Develop new functionality. · Deploy new functionality. · Support new functionality. · Support rollout of new functionality. · Document new functionality. · Test new functionality. · Operations of existing Mendix functionality (Ops). (...) No. 129336 Subject: Consultancy : Development of functionality employing the PaaS Mendix Company information: a) Company’s name: ______________________________________________________________________ b) Address (address responding to this EOI): ______________________________________________________________________ c) Telephone: ______________________________________________________________________ d) Fax: ______________________________________________________________________ e) Company contact: ______________________________________________________________________ f) E-mail: _____________________________________________________________________ Please note that this email address will be used for all tender correspondence with regard to this tender.
Language:English
Score: 476130.13 - https://www.icc-cpi.int/sites/...endix%20PaaS%20Consultancy.doc
Data Source: un
Summary Scope of Work/Terms of reference : Background The Office of the Prosecutor seeks to implement Investigation Management functionality to replace the existing Investigation Management system. Statement of Work (Range of Services) The required services are comprised but not limited to the following: · Software Architecture design. · Integration Architecture design. · Delivery of Mendix functionality (DevOps). · Design functionality. · Develop functionality. · Deploy functionality. · Support functionality. · Support rollout of functionality. · Document functionality. · Test functionality. · Operations of Mendix functionality (Ops). · Data migration. · Handover (functional and technical) of functionality.
Language:English
Score: 476130.13 - https://www.icc-cpi.int/sites/...ion%20management%20system).doc
Data Source: un
ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization” Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T Signaling ArchitectureSignaling Architecture Viqar Shaikh Telcordia ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T 2 Scope o Call Control Signaling Architecture • Identify Network Elements involved in call control signaling • Functions of these Network Elements o ATIS Functional Architecture and Interfaces o Illustrative Call Flows • IP origination and termination • IP origination and PSTN termination ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T 3 Overall Functional Architecture and Interfaces O ther IP N etw orks AS P- Mw Mw Mw/Mk/Mm Mr Mi Mp MnGq Dx Sh Rf/Ro PSTN /ISD N Ie Mi UE Mg Mj Gm ISC Cx Dh Ic Rr/Ro Cx Ib Ia Id PSTN If PDF MGCF I-CSCF BGCF HSS S-CSCF MRFC Mw SLF Charging Function SGF SGW IWF I-BGF RACS AS IBCF SEG NASS IMS functions SIP H.248 DIAMETER Other TISPAN functions MRFPA-BGF T-MGF MGW P-CSCF Access SBC Inter- connect SBC SCIMMRB ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T 4 Description of Signaling Network Elements o Application Server (AS) • Executes service logic associated with value-added services • Provides enhanced and intelligent services to subscribers o Call Session Control Function (CSCF) • Proxy CSCF (P-CSCF) is the first point of contact and the control point for the User Equipment (UE) within the Service Provider network. It forwards session requests from the UE to the S-CSCF • Serving CSCF (S-CSCF) has access to the user subscription data and actually handles the session request • Interrogating CSCF (I-CSCF) is the first contact point within a Service Provider network for all incoming session requests from another Service Provider o Breakout Gateway Control Function (BGCF) • Identifies the network that will be used for connecting IP sessions to the PSTN ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T 5 Description of Signaling Network Elements (Contd.) o Home Subscriber Server (HSS) • Stores all the static and dynamic information for a subscriber • Maintains a list of features and services associated with a user, and also the location and means of access to the user • Provides user profile information o Subscription Locator Function (SLF) • Queried during Registration and Session Setup to get the name of the HSS containing the required subscriber specific data o Media Gateway Control Function (MGCF) • Controls the parts of the call state that pertain to connection control for media channels in a T-MGF MGW • Selects the CSCF depending on the routing number for incoming calls from legacy networks • Performs protocol conversion between ISUP and call control protocols (e.g., SIP) and maintains call states ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T 6 Description of Signaling Network Elements (Contd.) o Multimedia Resource Function Controller (MRFC) • Controls the media stream resources in the MRFP under direction from an S-CSCF or Application Server • Interprets information coming from an AS or S-CSCF (e.g., session identifier) and controls MRFP accordingly o Multimedia Resource Function Processor (MRFP) • Provides media resources under the direction of MRFC • May generate media streams (e.g., multimedia announcements), mix incoming media streams for multiple parties, or process media streams (e.g., audio trans-coding, media analysis) o Policy Decision Function (PDF) • Provides management of network QoS resources, authorization of resource allocations, and makes policy decisions with regard to use of network QoS resources ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T 7 Description of Signaling Network Elements (Contd.) o Trunk Media Gateway Function (T-MGF) • Terminates bearer channels from a switched circuit network and media streams from a packet network (e.g., RTP streams in an IP network) • Establishes and releases connections between these channels under control of the MGCF in support of calls between PSTN and IP network o Signaling Gateway Function (SGF) • Acts as a gateway between the IP call/session control signaling and the SS7-based PSTN signaling • May provide signaling translation, for example between SIP and SS7 or simply signaling transport conversion e.g., SS7 over IP to SS7 over TDM ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T 8 Description of Signaling Network Elements (Contd.) o Access Border Gateway Function (A-BGF) • Packet gateway between an access network and a core network used to mask a service provider’s network from access networks, through which UE accessing packet-based services (e.g., IMS, Internet) • Functions may include Opening and closing gate, Traffic classification and marking, Traffic policing and shaping, Network address and port translation, and Usage information • Under control of the PDF o Interconnection Border Gateway Function (I-BGF) • Packet gateway used to interconnect a service provider’s core network with another service provider’s core network supporting the packet-based services • Functions may be the same as that of the A-BGF ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T 9 Description of Signaling Network Elements (Contd.) o Interconnection Border Control Function (I-BCF) • Controls I-BGF to interwork with other packet-based networks • May support the following functions (not limited to): — Inter-domain protocol normalization and/or repair — Inter-domain protocol interworking — Interaction with PDF for resource reservation, resource allocation, and/or other resource related information o Media Resource Broker (MRB) • Assigns specific media server resources to incoming calls at the request of service applications (i.e., an AS) • Acquires knowledge of media server resources utilization and reservation requests that it can use to help decide which media server resources to assign to resource requests from applications • Employs methods/algorithms to determine media server resource assignment ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T 10 ATIS Functional Architecture and Interfaces O ther IP N etw orks AS P- Mw Mw Mw/Mk/Mm Mr Mi Dx Sh Rf/Ro PSTN /ISD N Mi UE Mg Mj Gm ISC Cx Dh Ic Rr/Ro Cx Ib Ia Id PSTN If MGCF I-CSCF HSS S-CSCF MRFC Mw SLF Charging Function SGF SGW IWF I-BGF AS IBCF SEG MRFP T-MGF MGW P-CSCF Access SBC Inter- connect SBCMS A-BGF SCIM PSTN GW BGCF IMS functions SIP H.248 DIAMETER Other TISPAN functions MRB ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T 11 Decomposition of Application Layer and Interface to Service Control A pplication Service C ontrol SCIM APL * MRB HSS S/I-CSCF SLF MS ITU-T / ATIS Workshop “Next Generation Technology and Standardization“ Las Vegas, 19-20 March 2006 ITU-T 12 IP Origination and IP Termination Call Flow UE P-CSCF S/I-CSCF SBC SBC UE INVITE INVITE (Orig.
Language:English
Score: 475875.44 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/work...03/presentations/s4_shaikh.pdf
Data Source: un
Since every call control function may not be attached to an IN function, there is a need to provide remote call control - IN interaction support within the scope of the specification of the network based bearer transport independent call control signalling protocols. (...) Presently these forums are studying the physical separation of call control function and bearer control functions, and the physical separation of bearer control functions from switch control and port control functions. The specification of the network based bearer transport technology independent call control signalling protocols will be required to apply the concept of physical separation of call control functions and bearer transport control functions. In order that the call control functions are independent of bearer transport technology being controlled by the bearer transport control functions, the interaction between the call control functions and the bearer transport control function must be bearer technology independent.
Language:English
Score: 475873.97 - https://www.itu.int/ITU-T/2001-2004/com11/sg11-q9.html
Data Source: un
-- Module MKMD (X.750:10/1996) MKMD {joint-iso-itu-t(2) ms(9) function(2) part16(16) asn1Modules(2) 5} DEFINITIONS IMPLICIT TAGS ::= BEGIN dmiAttribute OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= {joint-iso-itu-t(2) ms(9) smi(3) part2(2) attribute(7)} dmiNotification OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= {joint-iso-itu-t(2) ms(9) smi(3) part2(2) notification(10)} mkmDirectoryAttributeType OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= {joint-iso-itu-t(2) ms(9) function(2) part16(16) standardSpecificExtension(0) directoryAttributeTypes(4)} mkmDirectoryObjectClass OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= {joint-iso-itu-t(2) ms(9) function(2) part16(16) standardSpecificExtension(0) directoryObjectClasses(6)} mkmDirectoryNameForm OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= {joint-iso-itu-t(2) ms(9) function(2) part16(16) standardSpecificExtension(0) directoryNameForms(7)} mkmMObjectClass OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= {joint-iso-itu-t(2) ms(9) function(2) part16(16) managedObjectClass(3)} mkmPackage OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= {joint-iso-itu-t(2) ms(9) function(2) part16(16) package(4)} mkmParameter OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= {joint-iso-itu-t(2) ms(9) function(2) part16(16) parameter(5)} mkmNameBinding OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= {joint-iso-itu-t(2) ms(9) function(2) part16(16) nameBinding(6)} mkmAttribute OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= {joint-iso-itu-t(2) ms(9) function(2) part16(16) attribute(7)} mkmAction OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= {joint-iso-itu-t(2) ms(9) function(2) part16(16) action(9)} END -- Generated by Asnp, the ASN.1 pretty-printer of France Telecom R&D
Language:English
Score: 475561.47 - https://www.itu.int/wftp3/Publ.../fl/itu-t/x/x750/1996/MKMD.asn
Data Source: un
Microsoft PowerPoint - MICS Statistical Snapshot Child Functioning - ENG.pptx Georgia 2018 Key Messages • 8% of children (2-17 years) have functional difficulties in at least one domain. (...) Herewith 1.4% and 1.3% have difficulties in learning and walking domains respectively. • There are no significant differences in child functioning regarding sex of the child and area of residence. • Percentage of children aged 5-17 with functional difficulties is highest in Kakheti (16%), while the percentage of children aged 2-4 with functional difficulties is the highest in Guria (6%). • 4% of children aged 2-17 have difficulties in seeing when wearing glasses; 0.3% have difficulties in hearing when using the hearing aid, 0.7% have difficulties walking when using equipment or receiving assistance for walking. (...) In order to achieve these goals, there is a need for cross-nationally comparable, reliable data. 2 10 8 2 9 8 1 10 8 0 5 10 15 20 2 - 4 years 5 - 17 years 2 - 17 years P e rc e n t Total Male Female Percentage of children age 2–17 years with functional difficulty in at least one domain, by domain of difficulty N/A- Not Applicable Child Functioning Child Functioning: Levels & Domains Child Functioning Levels by Age-Group Child Functioning Domains Percentage of children age 2–17 years with functional difficulty in at least one domain, by age groups Se ei ng H ea rin g W al ki ng Fi ne M ot or C om m un ic at io n Le ar ni ng Pl ay in g C on tr ol lin g B eh av io r Se lf ca re R em em be rin g C on ce nt ra tin g Ac ce pt in g C ha ng e M ak in g Fr ie nd s An xi et y D ep re ss io n National 2-4 years 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.05 1.2 0.9 0.1 0.2 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 5-17 years 0.6 0.5 1.3 N/A 0.6 1.4 N/A 1.0 0.4 0.8 0.8 0.9 0.6 4.4 1.6 Female, 8 Urban, 7 Fourth, 6 Upper Secondary, 6 Male, 8 Rural, 8 Second, 9 Primary or Lower Secondary, 11 0 5 10 15 Sex of child Area Wealth Quintile Mother's education P e rc e n t Child Functioning: Inequalities The Georgia Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) was carried out in 2018 by the National Statistics Office of Georgia as part of the global MICS programme.
Language:English
Score: 475548.9 - https://www.unicef.org/georgia...19-11/child_functioning_en.pdf
Data Source: un