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PCLG-Symposium-Land-Grabs-and-Conservation-background-note1-copy.pdf – !"! (...) % ! ! # policy and market forces. This surge in ‘land grabbing’' ( ! (...) ## ( # # of ‘green grabbing’, which constitutes land grabs which are linked to either conservation pursuits, or markets related to ‘green’ enterprises such as forestry (for timber, carbon offsettin# !
Language:English
Score: 1524252 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...ds/meetings/PCLG_Symposium.pdf
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Global land and water grab 1 Land grabbing in Europe: Myth or Reality? (...) TNI: the way we do research 2. Understanding land grabbing in Europe 3. Key findings 4. Some cases 5. (...) Work towards a holistic and human rights based land governance framework in the EU that integrates the social, cultural and ecological as well as economic values of land 7 Policy innovations at EU level High level task force EU Land Observatory Public policy restrictions on national land markets Guiding principles on EU land governance based on the CFS Tenure Guidelines 8 Conclusions  It is time to move beyond a state of denial: land grabbing is happening on Europe’s home territories, involving European actors and impacting European citizens  Land grabbing – when considered against the backdrop of other burning European land issues – should serve as a wake-up call for a new European model for land governance.  This should include (re)looking at how land consolidation and land banking policies and programmes are carried out.  The adoption by public authorities of simple, technical market tools is unable to address the fundamental challenges that farmland grabbing and associated processes raise for European society as a whole.  A more human-rights based, rather than capital-based approach would pave the way for the a democratic, sustainable and smart land governance that European farmers and citizens deserve.
Language:English
Score: 1513569.6 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...nts/events2017/landnet/9.1.pdf
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Such process leads to land grabbing in the EU but also outside the borders. The regulation known in France is contrasting with the permissive market of Belgium and the Netherlands. (...) Land concentration in high income countries is translated by land grabbing in relative cheaper land markets. The most timid measure of land grabbing comes from the Land Matrix. (...) Chapter 4 remains the key part regarding markets, land grabbing and investments; it is thus very relevant to the EU.
Language:English
Score: 1481873.2 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...Events2016/vggt_bp/Summary.pdf
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Study ‘Extent of Farmland Grabbing in the EU’ - key issues in the context of the LANDNET 1 Key issues in the context of the LANDNET Andrew Cartwright – Central European University Margarida Ambar – Ambar Consultancy 9th LANDNET Workshop in Budapest, Hungary 3-5 October 2017 Concept of ‘land grabbing’ Contested term  Here it is ‘Capturing of the decision making power over how land is to be used, by whom, for how long, and for what purposes’, or  Land that is acquired by “extra-economic” forces. When is a land grab not just a normal land transaction? Can it be land grabbing if the land grabbed is small? (...) Does land consolidation drive land grabbing?  “Executive Summary’ - “… the multiple drivers of farmland grabbing in the EU including: … land consolidation programmes in Eastern European Member States…”.  Land consolidation is about exchange and reallocation.
Language:English
Score: 1465737.9 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...nts/events2017/landnet/9.2.pdf
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The workshop will focus on various topics related to rural land market development and instruments like land consolidation and land leasing. (...) The global attention on land grabbing will be highlighted in a session presenting study results related to land grabbing in Europe. (...) 9th LANDNET Workshop in Budapest, Hungary Wednesday, 4 October 2017 Session 5 – Land leasing and land consolidation Chair: Richard Eberlin 09.00 – 09.30 Keynote presentation by Frank van Holst, RVO Netherlands: Land leasing for consolidation of agricultural production 09.30 – 10.00 Bulgaria: Land leasing in cases of large scale fragmented property and missing owners to secure sustainability in agriculture, Kiril Stoyanov, Union of Geodesists and Land Managers 10.00 – 10.30 Spain: Galician Land Bank - 10 years of experience with land leasing, Miguel Ángel Pérez Dubois, Xunta de Galicia 10.30 – 11.00 Coffee & Tea Break Session 6 – Regulatory frameworks of land markets and land consolidation Chair: Kiril Stoyanov 11.00 – 11.45 France: The regulation of land markets in France, Robert Levesque, FNSAFER Presentation and discussion 11.45 – 12.30 Regional study on land consolidation legislation in CEE Region, Morten Hartvigsen and Maxim Gorgan, FAO REU Presentation and discussion 12.30 – 14.00 Lunch Session 7 – Country developments Chair: Vilma Daugaliene 14.00 – 14.30 Netherlands: Developments in land consolidation: synthesis of the Apeldoorn Conference, Maartje Lof and Marije Louwsma, Cadastre, Land Registry and Mapping Agency 14.30 – 15.00 Romania: Dealing with land abandonment, Crina Turtoi, Institute of Agricultural Economics of the Romanian Academy 15.00 – 15.30 Denmark: Pilots for multi-functional land consolidation, Brian Graugaard, ORBICON A/S 15.30 – 16.00 Coffee & Tea Break Session 8 – LANDNET Helpdesk Chair: Frank van Holst 16.00 – 16.15 FAQ: Frequently Asking Questions 16.15 – 17.00 Technical exchange session by connecting demand and offer in a dynamic market setting 9th LANDNET Workshop in Budapest, Hungary Thursday, 5 October 2017 Session 9 – Land grabbing in Europe: reality or myth?
Language:English
Score: 1449035.2 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/.../events2017/landnet/agenda.pdf
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Because of the considerations of economic viability of agricultural (or land, or biotech) investment, of the expected profitability of a course of action that includes land grabs. My view is these principles will not be demonstrable in situ by any of its signatories in just the same way that market mechanisms that have been invented in the last 15 years as means to tackle serious inter-generational problems have proved (and continue to prove) to be instead mechanisms around which new industries profit. (...) References and notes GRAIN, 'Grabbing land for food', Seedling, January 2009 ' 'Land grabbing by foreign investors in developing countries: risks and opportunities', International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) Policy Brief, 2009 'Rising Global Interest in Farmland: Can it Yield Sustainable and Equitable Benefits?' (...) These range from irrigation systems and precision technologies to a market for sustainably produced food that models itself on consumers’ needs.
Language:English
Score: 1339133.9 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/index.php/comment/5302
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Because of the considerations of economic viability of agricultural (or land, or biotech) investment, of the expected profitability of a course of action that includes land grabs. My view is these principles will not be demonstrable in situ by any of its signatories in just the same way that market mechanisms that have been invented in the last 15 years as means to tackle serious inter-generational problems have proved (and continue to prove) to be instead mechanisms around which new industries profit. (...) References and notes GRAIN, 'Grabbing land for food', Seedling, January 2009 ' 'Land grabbing by foreign investors in developing countries: risks and opportunities', International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) Policy Brief, 2009 'Rising Global Interest in Farmland: Can it Yield Sustainable and Equitable Benefits?' (...) These range from irrigation systems and precision technologies to a market for sustainably produced food that models itself on consumers’ needs.
Language:English
Score: 1339133.9 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/comment/5302
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There is now less land available for local food production, which is due to increased property speculation in urban areas and land-grabbing for industrial food and agro-fuel production. (...) It is also essential for family farmers to have access to local markets. This is especially important at a time when large-scale agri-business producers are pushing small-scale producers out of their traditional market spaces, which has been aggravated by international dumping and WTO rules. (...) Sea, water and land-grabbing have many faces and the Aral Sea and Lake Urmia are examples where serious damage has already occurred as result of these things.
Language:English
Score: 1332852.05 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/..._28/ERC_CSO_Declaration_en.pdf
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Source: EXPERIENCES WITH LAND CONSOLIDATION AND LAND BANKING IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE AFTER 1989 • How much will this intervene in the freedom of people to operate on the market? • Will the land bank be in favour of land owners or users or will the state mainly care about its own interests? (...) • Won’t it create a vehicle for corruption? Land grab controversy • Land grabbing is a contested term. • Land grab: the taking of land without authority, which can involve displacing others from the land. (Source: Glossary of Land Related Terms with a Focus on the VGGT) • Multilingual thesaurus on land tenure (Rome, 2003) does not define land grabbing
Language:English
Score: 1332112.2 - https://www.fao.org/fileadmin/...nts/events2017/landnet/3.3.pdf
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Because of the considerations of economic viability of agricultural (or land, or biotech) investment, of the expected profitability of a course of action that includes land grabs. My view is these principles will not be demonstrable in situ by any of its signatories in just the same way that market mechanisms that have been invented in the last 15 years as means to tackle serious inter-generational problems have proved (and continue to prove) to be instead mechanisms around which new industries profit. (...) References and notes GRAIN, 'Grabbing land for food', Seedling, January 2009 ' 'Land grabbing by foreign investors in developing countries: risks and opportunities', International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) Policy Brief, 2009 'Rising Global Interest in Farmland: Can it Yield Sustainable and Equitable Benefits?' (...) These range from irrigation systems and precision technologies to a market for sustainably produced food that models itself on consumers’ needs.
Language:English
Score: 1326172 - https://www.fao.org/fsnforum/ru/comment/5302
Data Source: un