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REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON THE RIGHT TO FOOD, OLIVIER DE SCHUTTER : ADDENDUM
The non-economic impacts of trade liberalization: environmental and health dimensions ........................................ 29 - 32 14 VI. (...) All quantitative restrictions or other non-tariff measures except those justified by health and safety reasons should be replaced by tariffs (art. 4.2), which the members are subsequently bound to reduce (art. 4.1). (...) The non-economic impacts of trade liberalization: environmental and health dimensions 29. Reliance on international trade in order to achieve food security cannot ignore its impact on the environment and on nutrition.
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Puntuación: 1423683 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...pen&DS=A/HRC/10/5/ADD.2&Lang=S
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LETTER DATED 14 APRIL 2016 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF CHINA TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
While faced with the sluggish recovery of the world economy, a widening development gap between the North and the South and dwindling momentum in international development cooperation, the international community is also confronted with challenges such as the refugee crisis, terrorism, public health threats and climate change. All countries should work together to translate the commitments made by leaders into concrete actions by earnestly promoting and implementing the 2030 Agenda. (...) Improving social security and social services — It is important to improve the public service system, including employment, education and health care, and to ensure equal access to basic public services. (...) Efforts should also be made to provide minimum social protection and expand the coverage of social security. Basic health-care systems should be established and improved to make basic medical and health services more equitable and accessible, which is vital to safeguarding dignity of life for all.
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Puntuación: 1385491.7 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...sf/get?open&DS=A/70/834&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
LETTER DATED 20 OCTOBER 2017 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF MYANMAR TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
Investing in health and education sector 4.1 Health Myanmar is committed to transforming the health-care system so that millions more people can live better and for longer. The overarching goal is to achieve Universal Health Coverage in Myanmar by 2030. Everyone, regardless of their social or economic circumstances, will have access to the health services they need without financial hardship. National Health Plan (NHP) for 2017 -2021 was launched, and its main goal is to extend access to a Basic Essential Package of Health Services to the whole country by 2020.
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Puntuación: 1362600.2 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...get?open&DS=A/C.3/72/14&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
LETTER DATED 2001/04/11 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF NAMIBIA TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
With the exception of administrative departments such as the police and the judiciary, which may be authorized by law to maintain automated personal data files, no files shall contain in- formation on the private life, views, health or individuals, or on any other type of information that may violate the privacy of individuals, without the express authorization of the individuals concerned. (...) Article 20: Physical safety, working conditions and security of tenure The administration shall guarantee minimum standards of health, security and safety in the workplace. The administration shall grant public service employees immunity from prosecution in the per- formance of their duties which is within the purview of the law. (...) It shall be reprehensible for public service employees to offer gifts or other advantages that might influence in their favour or in favour of family members and friends, the judgement or decisions of another person.
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Puntuación: 1341100.6 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...nsf/get?open&DS=A/56/63&Lang=S
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REPORT OF THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR ON THE RIGHT TO FOOD, OLIVIER DE SCHUTTER : ADDENDUM
queryid=558. 3 Conference Board of Canada, http://www.conferenceboard.ca/hcp/hot-topics/recession.aspx. 4 Health Canada. Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.2 Nutrition (2004): Income related household food insecurity in Canada. (...) Though the situation of food insecurity is monitored through surveys such as the Canadian Community Health Survey, the Inuit Health Survey and the First Nations Food, Nutrition and Environment Study, data on food insecurity in Métis populations was not found. (...) It was repealed in 1996 and replaced by the Canada Health Transfer and Canada Social Transfer, which provide block-funding arrangements that permit provinces and territories to allocate health, education and social programme funding according to their own priorities.
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Puntuación: 1315492.8 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...en&DS=A/HRC/22/50/ADD.1&Lang=S
Fuente de datos: ods
LETTER DATED 14 SEPTEMBER 2016 FROM THE PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF CHINA TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
We also support policies that encourage firms of all sizes, in particular women and youth entrepreneurs, women-led firms and SMEs, to take full advantage of global value chains (GVCs), and that encourage greater participation, value addition and upward mobility in GVCs by developing countries, particularly low -income countries (LICs).We welcome the B20’s interest to strengthen digital trade and o ther work and take note of it’s initiative on an Electronic World Trade Platform (eWTP). 31. (...) We pledge to enhance policy coherence on sustainable development and reaffirm our commitment to further align our work with the universal implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Addis Ababa Action Agenda on financing for development, based on the compara tive advantage and the added value of the G20 and in accordance with our national circumstances, while acknowledging that the global follow -up and review of the 2030 Agenda is a UN-led process. (...) Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) poses a serious threat to public health, growth and global economic stability. We affirm the need to explore in an inclusive manner to fight antimicrobial resistance by developing evidence- based ways to prevent and mitigate resistance, and unlock research and development into new and existing antimicrobials
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Puntuación: 1299372.3 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...sf/get?open&DS=A/71/380&Lang=S
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ADVERSE EFFECTS OF ENDOSULFAN ON HUMAN HEALTH
ADVERSE EFFECTS OF ENDOSULFAN ON HUMAN HEALTH
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IDENTICAL LETTERS DATED 7 SEPTEMBER 2021 FROM THE SECRETARY-GENERAL ADDRESSED TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY AND THE PRESIDENT OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL
Participants recognised the need to address regional health challenges such as non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and HIV/aids while strengthening the capacity for preparedness and response to disease pandemics. 9. (...) The important role of the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA) was also underlined by participants. (...) It was agreed that the CARICOM Secretariat would continue working with the UN to strengthen public health and to advance regional development. 10.
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Puntuación: 1265190 - https://daccess-ods.un.org/acc...f/get?open&DS=A/75/1017&Lang=S
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NOTE VERBALE DATED 2005/03/21 FROM THE PERMANENT MISSION OF CAMBODIA TO THE UNITED NATIONS ADDRESSED TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE
He and delegate members said about advantages, which Cambodia re after entered a OPCW member. 5 . Although Cambodia did not produce and keep chemicaI Cambodia imported poisonous chemical substances 10 commercial and health secton, etc. Undtr data received fmm Ministry of Agriculture on che mostly utilized in agicul tunl sector for more than 20 metric tons a year.
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Puntuación: 1264766 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...S=S/AC.44/2004/(02)/110&Lang=S
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POLICY COMPETITION FOR FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT IN THE CARIBBEAN BASIN : COSTA RICA, THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC AND JAMAICA
In sum, a relatively large group of Asian developing countries and a relatively small group of Latin American ones proved capable of taking advantage of this opportunity to grow faster and become better integrated into the international economy. 14 Table 4 OECD IMPORTS OF MANUFACTURES, BY SOURCE REGIONS, 1980-1994 (Percentages) 1980 1985 1990 1994 Change 1980-1994 OECD 85.38 83.26 81.42 76.17 -11 North America 17.26 17.50 15.07 16.31 -6 Western Europe a 60.25 53.70 56.65 49.96 -17 Japan 8.74 12.53 9.99 10.12 16 Turkey 0.08 0.19 0.35 0.39 393 Developing Asia 7.79 10.26 12.06 15.80 103 China 0.52 0.81 1.98 4.04 680 Tigers b 5.40 7.39 7.25 7.30 35 Rest of Developing Asia c 1.87 2.06 2.83 4.46 139 Latin America and the Caribbean 2.07 2.68 2.72 3.29 59 Caribbean Basin 0.20 0.24 0.26 0.36 80 Mexico 0.71 1.09 1.29 1.93 173 Rest of Latin America 1.16 1.34 1.16 1.00 -14 Africa 1.30 0.96 0.82 0.76 -41 North Africa 0.21 0.23 0.30 0.37 77 Rest of Africa 1.09 0.73 0.52 0.40 -64 Eastern Europe 1.28 0.96 1.00 0.92 -28 Manufactures as % of total imports 54.5 63.9 72.7 74.4 37 Source: Based on the Competitive Analysis of Nations (CANPLUS) computer software. a Includes some non-OECD countries. b Hong Kong, the Republic of Korea, Singapore and Chinese Province of Taiwan. c India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Pakistan, the Philippines and Thailand. (...) Many United States corporations altered their strategies to take advantage of existing United States legislation which permitted companies based in the United States to export locally made components to be assembled into finished products outside the country; duties or taxes on the re-imported goods were assessed only on the value added outside of the country. (...) These countries were clearly playing a central role in the attempts by United States garment corporations to meet the Asian challenge in their own national market by taking advantage of United States policy measures, as well as the incentives and other benefits offered by the Latin American countries. 22 Table 10 STRUCTURE OF NORTH AMERICAN IMPORTS OF GARMENTS (SITC 84), BY SOURCE REGIONS, 1980-1994 (Percentages) 1980 1985 1990 1994 Change 1980-1994 OECD 12.71 15.45 11.16 9.25 -27 North America 2.10 1.61 1.66 2.63 25 Western Europe a 8.99 11.18 8.02 5.37 -40 Japan 3.10 3.01 0.71 0.33 -89 Turkey 0.03 0.59 1.17 1.28 4066 Developing Asia 74.86 72.34 69.52 63.05 -16 China 4.43 7.99 13.41 17.84 302 Tigers b 62.04 54.24 41.75 26.68 -57 Rest of Developing Asia c 8.39 10.11 14.86 18.53 121 Latin America and the Caribbean 8.11 6.60 11.96 17.15 111 Caribbean Basin 3.57 3.47 7.29 11.00 208 Mexico 3.07 1.63 2.57 4.23 38 Rest of Latin America 1.48 1.49 2.10 1.92 30 Africa 0.14 0.27 0.49 0.99 605 North Africa 0.06 0.07 0.33 0.60 955 Rest of Africa 0.08 0.21 0.16 0.39 367 Eastern Europe 1.59 0.99 0.54 0.51 -68 Garments as % of North American imports 2.6 4.1 4.7 5.1 98 Source: Based on the Competitive Analysis of Nations (CANPLUS) computer software. a Includes some non-OECD countries. b Hong Kong, the Republic of Korea, Singapore and Taiwan (Province of China). c India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Pakistan, the Philippines and Thailand.
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Puntuación: 1256056.8 - daccess-ods.un.org/acce...f/get?open&DS=LC/G.1991&Lang=S
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