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PMNCH as a ‘partner-centric’ Partnership The goal of the Partnership is to support the global health community to work towards achieving MDGs 4 and 5 by enhancing partners' interactions and using their comparative advantages to • Build consensus and promote evidence-based high-impact interventions and means to deliver them through harmonization. • Contribute to raising USD30b for (by 2015) to improve maternal, newborn and child health through advocacy, and • Track partners' commitments and measurement of progress for accountability. PMNCH is a ‘partner-centric’ global health partnership. This means that it exists to provide a forum in which Members work collaboratively in areas where they can support the global health community in achieving MDGs 4 and 5. (...) The Board has noted that current processes for allocating funding a) may give rise to real or perceived conflicts of interest, and (b) may provide an advantage to PMNCH Members as compared to other third parties.
Language:English
Score: 715718.65 - https://www.who.int/pmnch/abou...d8_i_6_conflictofinterests.pdf
Data Source: un
South-East Asia Home Health topics All health topics » A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Popular topics >>   Immunization Infant and young child feeding Health financing Health workforce   Health data and health information systems Traditional medicine Essential Medicines Tuberculosis  Featured topic >> Infant and young child feeding ©WHO/Christopher Black A health worker is feeding a baby with mashed food © Credits Our work Vaccine preventable disease>> Universal health coverage>> Resources>> Publications Data Flagships News Newsroom >> News releases Media Statements Feature stories Opinion Editorials World Health Day 2021 News releases World Health Day 2021 Featured story >> Step up efforts to eliminate measles: WHO © WHO SEARO/ Mehak Sethi © Credits Emergencies Outbreaks and emergencies COVID-19 Emergency Operations Country Health Emergency Preparedness & IHR Infectious Hazard Management Health Emergency Information & Risk Assessment South East Asia School in ORPHES Searhef Thailand becomes first in SEAR with WHO classified emergency medical team Health Ministers Commit to Emergency Preparedness Major Earthquake Hits Sulawesi, Indonesia About Overview >> Our focus Where we work Governance >> Regional Director Regional Committee Seventy-fourth Session of the Regional Committee Careers >> Contact Us >> From vision to results: advancing health for billions in the South-East Asia Region  Home / News / Detail / Take bold, co-operative action to make medicines available to all: WHO Take bold, co-operative action to make medicines available to all: WHO 9 September 2017 News release Maldives SEAR/PR/1661 Malé  - The World Health Organization today called on countries across the South-East Asia Region to take bold action to ensure all people everywhere have access to safe, efficacious, quality and affordable medical products, laying particular emphasis on the need to leverage collective strengths via greater intercountry cooperation. “Overcoming barriers and ensuring all people everywhere can access essential medicines is one of WHO South-East Asia’s priority areas of work, and is vital to achieving universal health coverage, and with it the Sustainable Development Goal of health and wellbeing for all. (...) The Regional Committee is the highest decision-making body for public health in the South-East Asia Region, and includes health ministers and senior health ministry officials of the Region’s 11 Member countries – Bangladesh, Bhutan, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, India, Indonesia, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Timor-Leste.
Language:English
Score: 715695.75 - https://www.who.int/southeasta...medicines-available-to-all-who
Data Source: un
“For rural parents, at face-value, the reasons to migrate to cities seem obvious: better access to jobs, health care and education opportunities for their children,” said Laurence Chandy, UNICEF Director of Data, Research and Policy. (...) Moreover, when children from urban and rural households with similar levels of wealth are compared, the urban advantage is no longer apparent.     “Children should be a focus of urban planning, yet in many cities they are forgotten, with millions of children cut-off from social services in urban slums and informal settlements, and exposed to environmental or health hazards due to overcrowding,” Chandy added. (...) The report is based on an analysis of 80 surveys (Demographic and Health Survey, DHS, and Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, MICS) from 77 countries conducted between 2011 and 2016.
Language:English
Score: 715655 - https://www.unicef.org/turkey/...kely-die-young-and-less-likely
Data Source: un
“For rural parents, at face-value, the reasons to migrate to cities seem obvious: better access to jobs, health care and education opportunities for their children,” said Laurence Chandy, UNICEF Director of Data, Research and Policy. (...) Moreover, when children from urban and rural households with similar levels of wealth are compared, the urban advantage is no longer apparent.   “Children should be a focus of urban planning, yet in many cities they are forgotten, with millions of children cut-off from social services in urban slums and informal settlements, and exposed to environmental or health hazards due to overcrowding,” Chandy added. (...) The report is based on an analysis of 80 surveys (Demographic and Health Survey, DHS, and Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, MICS) from 77 countries conducted between 2011 and 2016.
Language:English
Score: 715655 - https://www.unicef.org/eap/pre...kely-die-young-and-less-likely
Data Source: un
South-East Asia Home Health topics All health topics » A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Popular topics >>   Immunization Infant and young child feeding Health financing Health workforce   Health data and health information systems Traditional medicine Essential Medicines Tuberculosis  Featured topic >> Infant and young child feeding ©WHO/Christopher Black A health worker is feeding a baby with mashed food © Credits Our work Vaccine preventable disease>> Universal health coverage>> Resources>> Publications Data Flagships News Newsroom >> News releases Media Statements Feature stories Opinion Editorials World Health Day 2021 News releases World Health Day 2021 Featured story >> Step up efforts to eliminate measles: WHO © WHO SEARO/ Mehak Sethi © Credits Emergencies Outbreaks and emergencies COVID-19 Emergency Operations Country Health Emergency Preparedness & IHR Infectious Hazard Management Health Emergency Information & Risk Assessment South East Asia School in ORPHES Searhef Thailand becomes first in SEAR with WHO classified emergency medical team Health Ministers Commit to Emergency Preparedness Major Earthquake Hits Sulawesi, Indonesia About Overview >> Our focus Where we work Governance >> Regional Director Regional Committee Seventy-fourth Session of the Regional Committee Careers >> Contact Us >> From vision to results: advancing health for billions in the South-East Asia Region  Home / News / Detail / WHO raises alarm over tobacco industry’s tactics WHO raises alarm over tobacco industry’s tactics 30 May 2012 News release India PR1544 New Delhi: On the occasion of World No Tobacco Day on 31 May, WHO has urged governments to beware of the tobacco industry’s interference in tobacco control programme. (...) Nepal recently prohibited smoking and chewing tobacco in public places, mandated graphic health warnings and provisions for health funds from tobacco taxation. (...) Tobacco companies in the Region are taking advantage of these liberal cross-border trade areas to the best of their advantage.
Language:English
Score: 715230.7 - https://www.who.int/southeasta...ver-tobacco-industry-s-tactics
Data Source: un
WHO | Health eLibrary Training Now Globally Available Access Home Alt+0 Content Alt+2 Search Search HINARI Submit Language عربي 中文 English Français Русский Español Menu Hinari About Hinari Access the content Eligibility Partners Training materials Promoting Hinari Contributions Health eLibrary Training Now Globally Available 31 October 2011 - Health and educational institutions in low-income countries worldwide can now take advantage of free e-training materials on conducting effective scientific literature searches, thanks to a joint effort of Duke University and the World Health Organization. Newsletter story HINARI Programme User Training Last update: 1 November 2011 02:13 CET You are here: HINARI Access to Research in Health Programme News Quick Links Sitemap HINARI About HINARI Full-text journals, databases and other resources Eligibility Register Partners Publishers' statement Frequently asked questions Training Using HINARI Privacy E-mail scams © WHO 2022
Language:English
Score: 714963.96 - https://www.who.int/hinari/new...ing_Now_Globally_Available/en/
Data Source: un
Select language Select language English العربية 中文 Français Русский Español Português Home Health Topics All topics » A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Resources » Fact sheets Facts in pictures Multimedia Publications Questions & answers Tools and toolkits Popular » Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) Ebola virus disease Air pollution Hepatitis Top 10 causes of death World Health Assembly » Countries All countries » A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Regions » Africa Americas South-East Asia Europe Eastern Mediterranean Western Pacific WHO in countries » Statistics Cooperation strategies Yemen crisis » Sadeq Al Wesabi Hasan An internally displaced family in a camp in Hudaydah © Credits   Newsroom All news » News releases Statements Campaigns Commentaries Events Feature stories Speeches Spotlights Newsletters Photo library Media distribution list Headlines » Timeline: WHO's COVID-19 response »   Emergencies Focus on » COVID-19 pandemic Ebola virus disease outbreak DRC 2021 Syria crisis Crisis in Northern Ethiopia Afghanistan Crisis Latest » Disease Outbreak News Travel advice Situation reports Weekly Epidemiological Record WHO in emergencies » Surveillance Research Funding Partners Operations Independent Oversight and Advisory Committee Health Emergency Dashboard » WHO © Credits Data Data at WHO » Global Health Estimates Health SDGs Mortality Triple billion targets Data collections Dashboards » COVID-19 Dashboard Triple Billion Dashboard Health Equity monitor Mortality Highlights » GHO SCORE Insights and visualizations Data collection tools Reports World Health Statistics 2021 » WHO © Credits About WHO About WHO » People Teams Structure Partnerships Collaborating Centres Networks, committees and advisory groups Transformation Our Work » General Programme of Work WHO Academy Activities Initiatives Funding » Assessed contributions Flexible funding WHO Foundation Accountability » Audit Budget Financial statements Programme Budget Portal Results Report Governance » World Health Assembly Executive Board Election of Director-General Governing Bodies website Home / News / item / Exclusive breastfeeding for six months best for babies everywhere Exclusive breastfeeding for six months best for babies everywhere 15 January 2011 Statement Reading time: WHO recommends mothers worldwide to exclusively breastfeed infants for the child's first six months to achieve optimal growth, development and health. (...) The systematic review's findings suggest that exclusive breastfeeding of infants with only breast milk, and no other foods or liquids, for six months has several advantages over exclusive breastfeeding for 3-4 months followed by mixed breastfeeding. These advantages include a lower risk of gastrointestinal infection for the baby, more rapid maternal weight loss after birth, and delayed return of menstrual periods.
Language:English
Score: 714449.6 - https://www.who.int/news/item/...ths-best-for-babies-everywhere
Data Source: un
In my view, this is one of the biggest challenges facing health promotion. (…) it is not just Big Tobacco anymore. Public health must also contend with Big Food, Big Soda and Big Alcohol. (...) Few governments prioritize health over big business.”5 1 ITeM is a non-profit research and advocacy organization in special consultative status with ECOSOC, based in Montevideo, Uruguay.
Language:English
Score: 713157.13 - https://www.un.org/esa/ffd/ffd..._Bissio_statement_15-04-08.pdf
Data Source: un
“For rural parents, at face-value, the reasons to migrate to cities seem obvious: better access to jobs, health care and education opportunities for their children,” said Laurence Chandy, UNICEF Director of Data, Research and Policy. (...) Moreover, when children from urban and rural households with similar levels of wealth are compared, the urban advantage is no longer apparent.   “Children should be a focus of urban planning, yet in many cities they are forgotten, with millions of children cut-off from social services in urban slums and informal settlements, and exposed to environmental or health hazards due to overcrowding,” Chandy added. (...) The report is based on an analysis of 80 surveys (Demographic and Health Survey, DHS, and Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, MICS) from 77 countries conducted between 2011 and 2016.
Language:English
Score: 713157.13 - https://www.unicef.org/press-r...kely-die-young-and-less-likely
Data Source: un
UN Womenwatch | Rural Women - Facts & Figures: Rural Women and the Millennium Development Goals UN System & Rural Women Introduction Education & Training Health Access Food Security Social Protection Decent Work Markets Climate Change Policy Decision-making FAO Comparative Advantage Good Practices 1 Good Practices 2 IFAD Comparative Advantage Good Practices ITC-ILO Comparative Advantage SPFII Comparative Advantage Good Practices UNCTAD Comparative Advantage UNDP Comparative Advantage Good Practices UNESCO Comparative Advantage UNFPA Comparative Advantage Good Practices 1 Good Practices 2 UN Women Comparative Advantage Good Practices WFP Good Practices WHO Comparative Advantage Good Practices Joint Efforts Facts & Figures Related News Related Resources Facts & Figures: Rural Women and the Millennium Development Goals This fact sheet [ 1 ] highlights the progress of rural women against key Millennium Development Goal (MDG) indicators, pointing to some of the advancements made and gaps that still exist. (...) Goal 5: Improve Maternal Health More Rural Women Receive Assistance During Delivery, But Inequalities Remain Quality reproductive health services and well-timed interventions are fundamental for achieving good maternal health, yet hundreds of thousands of women die each year because of a lack of such services. (...) Figure 12 Source: WHO global health observatory data repository. WHO elaboration.
Language:English
Score: 712464.06 - https://www.un.org/womenwatch/.../ruralwomen/facts-figures.html
Data Source: un